Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

The Maid and the Magpie An Interesting Tale Founded on Facts   By:

Book cover

First Page:

THE MAID AND THE MAGPIE

an Interesting Tale

Founded on Facts

by

CHARLES MORETON

[Illustration: FRONTISPIECE.

Verse 4 ]

London. Published by G. Stevens, 10 Borough Road, Southwark.

[Illustration: Verse 16 ]

THE

MAID

AND THE

MAGPIE.

1

At Palaiseau, there liv'd a maid, In form and features mild; The stings of conscience never prey'd, On this devoted child.

2

She serv'd a wealthy farmer there, An honest soul was he; Her comforts were his only care, And all he wish'd to see.

3

His wife was of another mould, And prematurely smart; Hasty, and rash, with that a scold, Yet still a feeling heart.

4

One summers eve', her labor done, She sat in pensive plight; Watching the clear declining sun, With rapt'rous delight.

5

'Twas then, that Blaisot trembling came And sitting by her side; Ventur'd to declare his flame, And ask her for his bride.

6

He told his tale of tender love, Then on her hand he sigh'd! Annette she blush'd, her love to prove And with his suit complied.

7

In mutual flame, their bosoms burn, He steals a rapt'rous kiss; When soon old Juliannes return, Distroy'd the lovers bliss.

8

By Farm house door in wicker cage, A Magpie hung to view; Whose prattling tongue would oft assuage, The melancholy few.

9

Julianne now strict orders made, To clean up all the plate; Annette her orders quick obey'd And sought the outer gate.

10

Her Father who was sadly poor, And wander'd heedless were; Just at the moment reach'd the door, In wild, and deep dispair.

11

His wretched form, she knew full well, His voice she knew as soon; Her feelings now what pen can tell, She dropt both fork and spoon.

12

She rush'd distracted to his arms, In extacy of joy; Nor dreamt that scoffs and rude alarms Would e'er her peace destroy.

13

When at this moment from his hold, The Magpie swiftly flew; He seiz'd the spoon: ah! wretch so bold, And dragg'd it from their view.

14

Swift to the Abbey then he sped, Borne on the buoyant air; Nor ever thought that as he fled, Annette his guilt would bear.

[Illustration: Verse 32 ]

15

Look up my child and view me here, One lost to all his clan; My enemies, alas! are near, To claim a wretched man.

16

Then on his neck the fair one fell, A victim to dispair; He strove her fondness to dispell, Her grief he could not bear.

17

Just at this moment past the door, A wretch to feelings blind; He view'd the guest, and saw him poor, And therefore prov'd unkind.

18

What wretched man is that I see In garb so sad and torn? A weary traveller, said she, Who wanders here forlorn.

19

Come hither girl, come hither lass, Said justice with a smile; Come cheer your spirits with a glass, Each anxious hour beguile.

20

She saw his motive, knew his aim, Her heart was elsewhere plac'd; Her Blaisot's form, her Blaisot's name, Was no where to be trac'd.

21

Just at this pause, there enter'd straight, His worships clerk with speed; With papers relative to fate, Or some foul bloody deed.

22

Read this my child, the justice said, And tell me what they say; Judge what she felt; ah! luckless maid, Now think of her dismay.

[Illustration: Verse 44 ]

23

Her Fathers name was couple'd there, With death and sore disgrace; "Desertion" was his crime, dispair Was written in her face.

24

She urg'd the justice from the spot, And he at length compli'd; She trembel'd for a parents lot, She wept, she sobb'd, she cried.

25

Her Fathers heart, by fears opprest, He stagger'd to a chair; He falter'd, spoke, then on her breast, He fell in wild dispair.

26

Oh! pitying Heav'n, preserve my child Preserve her God from ill; Then I in accents soft and mild Will bear thy tortures still.

27

Then from his belt a fork and spoon He plac'd before her view; He paus'd, before he ask'd the boon, While tears his cheeks bedew.

28

Take these sad relicks, all I hold, The wreck of fortune lost; And quick exchange them love for gold, For one by fortune crost.

29

Thy form I must not see again, Then mark my last decree; The gold that these, my love obtain, Convey to yonder tree... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books