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Mobilizing Woman-Power   By: (1856-1940)

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First Page:

MOBILIZING WOMAN POWER

By HARRIOT STANTON BLATCH

1918

[Illustration: Jeanne d'Arc. the spirit of the women of the Allies.]

TO THE ABLE AND DEVOTED WOMEN OF GREAT BRITAIN AND FRANCE

Who have stood behind the armies of the Allies through the years of the Great War as an unswerving second line of defense against an onslaught upon the liberty and civilization of the world, I dedicate this volume.

HARRIOT STANTON BLATCH

CONTENTS

FOREWORD BY THEODORE ROOSEVELT

I. OUR FOE

II. WINNING THE WAR

III. MOBILIZING WOMEN IN GREAT BRITAIN

IV. MOBILIZING WOMEN IN FRANCE

V. MOBILIZING WOMEN IN GERMANY

VI. WOMEN OVER THE TOP IN AMERICA

VII. EVE'S PAY ENVELOPE

VIII. POOLING BRAINS

IX. "BUSINESS AS USUAL"

X. "AS MOTHER USED TO DO"

XI. A LAND ARMY

XII. WOMAN'S PART IN SAVING CIVILIZATION

ILLUSTRATIONS

Jeanne d'Arc the spirit of the women of the Allies

They wear the uniforms of the Edinburgh trams and the New York City subway and trolley guards, with pride and purpose.

Then the offered service of the Women's Reserve Ambulance Corps in England was spurned. Now they wear shrapnel helmets while working during the Zeppelin raids.

The French poilu on furlough is put to work harrowing.

Has there ever been anything impossible to French women since the time of Jeanne d'Arc? The fields must be harrowed they have no horses.

The daily round in the Erie Railroad workshops.

In the well lighted factory of the Briggs and Stratton Company, Milwaukee, the girls are comfortably and becomingly garbed for work.

The women of the Motor Corps of the National League for Woman's Service refuting the traditions that women have neither strength nor endurance.

Down the street they come, beginning their pilgrimage of alleviation and succor on the battlefields of France.

How can business be "as usual" when in Paris there are about 1800 of these small workshops where a woman dips Bengal Fire and grenades into a bath of paraffin!

Countess de Berkaim and her canteen in the Gare de St. Lazarre, Paris.

An agricultural unit in the uniform approved by the Woman's Land Army of America.

A useful blending of Allied women. Miss Kathleen Burke (Scotch) exhibiting the X ray ambulance equipped by Mrs. Ayrton (English) and Madame Curie (French).

FOREWORD

It is a real pleasure to write this foreword to the book which Mrs. Harriot Stanton Blatch dedicates to the women of Great Britain and France; to the women who through the years of the great war have stood as the second line of defense against the German horror which menaces the liberty and civilization of the entire world.

There could be no more timely book. Mrs. Blatch's aim is to stir the women of this country to the knowledge that this is their war, and also to make all our people feel that we, and especially our government, should welcome the service of women, and make use of it to the utmost. In other words, the appeal of Mrs. Blatch is essentially an appeal for service. No one has more vividly realized that service benefits the one who serves precisely as it benefits the one who is served. I join with her in the appeal that the women shall back the men with service, and that the men in their turn shall frankly and eagerly welcome the rendering of such service on the basis of service by equals for a common end .

Mrs. Blatch makes her appeal primarily because of the war needs of the moment. But she has in view no less the great tasks of the future. I welcome her book as an answer to the cry that the admission of women to an equal share in the right of self government will tend to soften the body politic. Most certainly I will ever set my face like flint against any unhealthy softening of our civilization, and as an answer in advance to hyper criticism I explain that I do not mean softness in the sense of tender heartedness; I mean the softness which, extends to the head and to the moral fibre, I mean the softness which manifests itself either in unhealthy sentimentality or in a materialism which may be either thoughtless and pleasure loving or sordid and money getting... Continue reading book >>




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