Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Music Notation and Terminology

Music Notation and Terminology by Karl Wilson Gehrkens
By: (1882-1975)

Until relatively recently, music students at all levels of study—from the conservatories to public schools—had few resources available for the formal study of musical notation and terminology in the classroom. In fact, it was not until 1914, when Professor Karl Gehrkens at the Oberlin School of Music published this compilation of class notes and sources he collected over the years, that a uniform text became available for schools and universities everywhere. Since the publication of this monumental work, similar textbooks have emerged, but Dr. Gehrkens’ contribution remains thoroughly worthwhile—particularly since it provides not just the definitions of musical terms, but also the historical context of those terms. This inclusion enables students of music to better understand and remember those terms, and provides a platform from which Gehrkens argues for a uniform usage of musical terminology. Also included in the book are numerous musical excerpts, pictures, and actual analyses of musical examples.

Recommended for the musically curious as well as the serious musical student.

First Page:

MUSIC NOTATION AND TERMINOLOGY

by

KARL W. GEHRKENS, A.M.

Associate Professor of School Music Oberlin Conservatory of Music

[Illustration: [publisher logo]]

The A. S. Barnes Company New York 1914 Copyright, 1914, by The A. S. Barnes Company

PREFACE

The study of music notation and terminology by classes in conservatories and in music departments of colleges and normal schools is a comparative innovation, one reason for the non existence of such courses in the past being the lack of a suitable text book, in which might be found in related groups clear and accurate definitions of the really essential terms. But with the constantly increasing interest in music study (both private and in the public schools), and with the present persistent demand that music teaching shall become more systematic and therefore more efficient in turning out a more intelligent class of pupils, it has become increasingly necessary to establish courses in which the prospective teacher of music (after having had considerable experience with music itself) might acquire a concise and accurate knowledge of a fairly large number of terms, most of which he has probably already encountered as a student, and many of which he knows the general meaning of, but none of which he perhaps knows accurately enough to enable him to impart his knowledge clearly and economically to others... Continue reading book >>


Stream audiobook and download chapters






eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books