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News From Nowhere

News From Nowhere by William Morris
By: (1834-1896)

News from Nowhere (1890) is a classic work combining utopian socialism and soft science fiction written by the artist, designer and socialist pioneer William Morris. In the book, the narrator, William Guest, falls asleep after returning from a meeting of the Socialist League and awakes to find himself in a future society based on common ownership and democratic control of the means of production. In this society there is no private property, no big cities, no authority, no monetary system, no divorce, no courts, no prisons, and no class systems. This agrarian society functions simply because the people find pleasure in nature, and therefore they find pleasure in their work. In the novel, Morris tackles one of the most common criticisms of socialism; the supposed lack of incentive to work in a communistic society. Morris' response is that all work should be creative and pleasurable.

First Page:

NEWS FROM NOWHERE OR AN EPOCH OF REST BEING SOME CHAPTERS FROM A UTOPIAN ROMANCE

BY WILLIAM MORRIS, AUTHOR OF 'THE EARTHLY PARADISE.'

TENTH IMPRESSION

LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO. 39 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON NEW YORK, BOMBAY, AND CALCUTTA 1908

All rights reserved

First printed serially in the Commonweal, 1890.

Thence reprinted at Boston , Mass. , 1890.

First English Edition , revised , Reeves & Turner , 1891.

Reprinted April , June 1891; March 1892.

Kelmscott Press Edition , 1892.

Since reprinted March 1895; January 1897; November 1899; August 1902; July 1905; January 1907; and January 1908.

CHAPTER I: DISCUSSION AND BED

Up at the League, says a friend, there had been one night a brisk conversational discussion, as to what would happen on the Morrow of the Revolution, finally shading off into a vigorous statement by various friends of their views on the future of the fully developed new society.

Says our friend: Considering the subject, the discussion was good tempered; for those present being used to public meetings and after lecture debates, if they did not listen to each others' opinions (which could scarcely be expected of them), at all events did not always attempt to speak all together, as is the custom of people in ordinary polite society when conversing on a subject which interests them... Continue reading book >>


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