Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Nobody's Child   By:

Book cover

First Page:

NOBODY'S CHILD

By ELIZABETH DEJEANS

Author of THE TIGER'S COAT, etc.

FRONTISPIECE BY ARTHUR I. KELLER

INDIANAPOLIS THE BOBBS MERRILL COMPANY PUBLISHERS

COPYRIGHT 1918

THE BOBBS MERRILL COMPANY

PRESS OF BRAUNWORTH & CO. BOOK MANUFACTURERS BROOKLYN, N. Y.

[Illustration]

CONTENTS

I ANN

II THREE MEN AND A GIRL

III PENNIMAN AND WESTMORE

IV BUT IF HE FAILED HER?

V IN COLONIAL FASHION

VI BAIRD RECONNOITERS

VII THE WESTMORES OF WESTMORE

VIII THE COLONEL IS SUSPICIOUS

IX A FEMININE PROCEDURE

X THE INFINITELY PAINFUL THING

XI KEPT IN THE DARK

XII A VENDETTA

XIII INERADICABLY BRANDED

XIV THE MISFITS

XV AS WITH A CHILD

XVI "IT WAS BORN IN HER"

XVII COMPLEXITIES

XVIII "YOU'RE ALL I HAVE"

XIX A BARGAIN

XX MARRY? YES

XXI A LOT OF PLANNING

XXII IMPRESSIONS

XXIII CHAOTIC UNCERTAINTY

XXIV A DEFINITION OF LOVE

XXV BECAUSE SHE LOVED TOO MUCH

XXVI THE ETERNAL ATTRACTION

XXVII THE THING

XXVIII THE HELL HOLE OF THE WESTMORES

XXIX "WHAT'S NOT KNOWN"

XXX CONTENT

XXXI THE FAMILY NAME

XXXII THE DEATH TRAP

XXXIII FROM DESPAIR TO HOPE

XXXIV BEN BROKAW EXPLAINS

XXXV WAITING

XXXVI "IT LIES WITH ANN"

XXXVII COLD CASH

XXXVIII THE REVELATION

XXXIX "WILL YOU GO WITH ME?"

CONCLUSION

NOBODY'S CHILD

I

ANN

The quietude of winter still lay on the land, the apathetic dun of field and woodland unstirred as yet by the hint of spring that was tipping with eagerness the wings of the birds and, under their brown frost dulled blanket, was quickening into fresh green the woody stems of arbutus. The mid morning sun had struggled out of a gray March chill and was setting a gleam the drops of moisture on trees and grass, drawing little rivulets from the streaks of snow which hid in the corners of the rail fences and in the hollows of the creek. Winter was reluctantly saying farewell.

The girl, who a mile back had turned in from the old Fox Ridge Post Road and had come up through the pastures to the edge of the woodland, looked with smiling understanding at the slow yielding of winter. Another winter added to her sum of seventeen. Or, rather, as youth always looks forward and counts much upon the future, perhaps a joyous spring to be added to her sum of experience.

As she sat, swaying gently to the jerky motion of the creaking buggy, the reins lax in her hands, her eyes from beneath the shadow of her brown hood traveled over the reaches of pasture, the slopes of reddish soil freshly turned for oats, the trails of the snake fences strangled by brown undergrowth, the twists and curves of the creek that divided the pasture from the upward slopes of grain land, and, beyond, against the horizon, the red scars and dull patches of scrubby growth that marked the "Mine Banks," the ancient, worked out, and now overgrown and abandoned iron ore bed that a hundred and fifty years before had yielded wealth to its owners.

"Spring will make even the Mine Banks lovely," Ann Penniman was thinking.

She had come up now to the woodland, a wide half circle of tall oaks and chestnuts, which, like the bend of a huge bow, touched the Mine Banks in the distance, and behind her reached to the Post Road. She skirted the woods for a time, the horse straining through sand, a rough road, in the winter rarely traveled, but in summer a possible short cut from the Post Road to the Penniman farm, which was just beyond the woods.

A short distance ahead, this side of where the creek came out into the open, the road turned and led into the woods, and Ann had almost reached the turn when a streak of red, a fox running swift and low, darted across the road, slid over the corner of pasture that lay between the woods and the creek, reappeared beyond the creek, then sped up the slope of plowed ground, making for the shelter of the Mine Banks.

Ann drew up and waited a moment, until the woods awoke to the deep bay of the hounds as they picked up the scent, followed by the halloo of the huntsmen... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books