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Observations on Madness and Melancholy Including Practical Remarks on those Diseases together with Cases and an Account of the Morbid Appearances on Dissection   By: (1764-1844)

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OBSERVATIONS ON MADNESS AND MELANCHOLY:

INCLUDING PRACTICAL REMARKS ON THOSE DISEASES;

TOGETHER WITH CASES:

AND AN ACCOUNT OF THE MORBID APPEARANCES ON DISSECTION .

BY JOHN HASLAM,

LATE OF PEMBROKE HALL, CAMBRIDGE; MEMBER OF THE ROYAL COLLEGE OF SURGEONS, AND APOTHECARY TO BETHLEM HOSPITAL.

The Second Edition, considerably enlarged.

"Of the uncertainties of our present state, the most dreadful and alarming is the uncertain continuance of reason." Dr. JOHNSON'S RASSELAS.

London:

PRINTED FOR J. CALLOW, MEDICAL BOOKSELLER, CROWN COURT, PRINCES STREET, SOHO; BY G. HAYDEN, BRYDGES STREET, COVENT GARDEN. 1809.

AS A GRATEFUL ACKNOWLEDGMENT FOR MANY FAVOURS, AN OBLATION TO SUBSISTING FRIENDSHIP, AND A TRIBUTE TO SUPERIOR JUDGMENT, EXERCISING THE PROFESSION OF MEDICINE WITH SKILL AND LIBERALITY: THE PRESENT VOLUME IS RESPECTFULLY DEDICATED TO DR. THOMAS MONRO, A FELLOW OF THE COLLEGE, AND PHYSICIAN TO BETHLEM HOSPITAL.

Preface.

The alarming increase of Insanity, as might naturally be expected, has incited many persons to an investigation of this disease; some for the advancement of Science, and others with the hope of emolument.

More than ten years having elapsed since the publication of the "Observations on Insanity," a trifle, which the Profession has held in greater estimation than its intrinsic merits could justify: the present work is modestly introduced to the public notice, as a corrected copy of the former, with considerable additions, which the extensive scope of Bethlem Hospital would have furnished more liberally to a more intelligent observer.

To have taken a comprehensive survey of the human faculties in their sound state; to have exhibited them impaired by natural decay, and transformed by disease, would have implied an ability to which I cannot pretend; would have required many volumes to unfold, and perhaps more patience than any rational experience could have attributed to the reader. The contents of the following pages are therefore to be considered as an abbreviated relation, and condensed display of many years observation and practice, in a situation affording constant opportunities and abundant supplies for such investigations.

It is natural to presume, that amongst my professional acquaintance the subject of Insanity must have been frequently introduced as a topic of discourse; and I am ready to acknowledge, that I have often profited by their remarks and suggestions: but I should be ungrateful were I not to confess my particular obligations to my esteemed friend, Anthony Carlisle, Esq. Surgeon to the Westminster Hospital, for many corrections, and some communications, which I shall ever value as judicious and important.

BETHLEM HOSPITAL, NOV. 21, 1808.

ERRATA.

Page 3, line 7, for controverted, read converted. 5, 2, for phrenitic, read phrenetic. 90, 3, for hyatids, read hydatids. 254, in the Table , for manical, read maniacal.

OBSERVATIONS ON MADNESS, &c. &c.

CHAPTER I.

DEFINITION.

There is no word in the English language more deserving of a precise definition than madness: and if those who have treated on this subject have been so unfortunate as to disagree with each other, and consequently have left their readers to reconcile their discordant opinions; yet it must be confessed that considerable pains have been bestowed, to convey a clear and accurate explanation of this term. Although this contrariety of sentiment has prevailed concerning the precise meaning of the word madness, medical practitioners have been sufficiently reconciled as to the thing itself: so that when they have seen an insane person, however opposite their definitions, they have readily coincided that the patient was mad.

From this it would appear that the thing itself, is, generally speaking, sufficiently plain and intelligible; but that the term which represents the thing is obscure... Continue reading book >>




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