Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Old Greek Folk Stories Told Anew   By: (1874-1922)

Book cover

First Page:

OLD GREEK FOLK STORIES

TOLD ANEW

BY

JOSEPHINE PRESTON PEABODY

1897

PUBLISHERS' NOTE.

Hawthorne, in his Wonder Book and Tanglewood Tales , has told, in a manner familiar to multitudes of American children and to many more who once were children, a dozen of the old Greek folk stories. They have served to render the persons and scenes known as no classical dictionary would make them known. But Hawthorne chose a few out of the many myths which are constantly appealing to the reader not only of ancient but of modern literature. The group contained in the collection which follows will help to fill out the list; it is designed to serve as a complement to the Wonder Book and Tanglewood Tales , so that the references to the stories in those collections are brief and allusive only. In order to make the entire series more useful, the index added to this number of the Riverside Literature Series is made to include also the stories contained in the other numbers of the series which contain Hawthorne's two books. Thus the index serves as a tolerably full clue to the best known characters in Greek mythology.

Once upon a time, men made friends with the Earth. They listened to all that woods and waters might say; their eyes were keen to see wonders in silent country places and in the living creatures that had not learned to be afraid. To this wise world outside the people took their joy and sorrow; and because they loved the Earth, she answered them.

It was not strange that Pan himself sometimes brought home a shepherd's stray lamb. It was not strange, if one broke the branches of a tree, that some fair life within wept at the hurt. Even now, the Earth is glad with us in springtime, and we grieve for her when the leaves go. But in the old days there was a closer union, clearer speech between men and all other creatures, Earth and the stars about her.

Out of the life that they lived together, there have come down to us these wonderful tales; and, whether they be told well or ill, they are too good to be forgotten.

CONTENTS.

THE WOOD FOLK

THE JUDGMENT OF MIDAS

PROMETHEUS

THE DELUGE

ORPHEUS AND EURYDICE

ICARUS AND DAEDALUS

PHAETHON

NIOBE

ADMETUS AND THE SHEPHERD

ALCESTIS

APOLLO'S SISTER

I. DIANA AND ACTAEON II. DIANA AND ENDYMION

THE CALYDONIAN HUNT

ATALANTA'S RACE

ARACHNE

PYRAMUS AND THISBE

PYGMALION AND GALATEA

OEDIPUS

CUPID AND PSYCHE

THE TRIAL OF PSYCHE

STORIES OP THE TROJAN WAR

I. THE APPLE OF DISCORD II. THE ROUSING OF THE HEROES III. THE WOODEN HORSE

THE HOUSE OF AGAMEMNON

THE ADVENTURES OF ODYSSEUS

I. THE CURSE OF POLYPHEMUS II. THE WANDERING OF ODYSSEUS III. THE HOME COMING

THE WOOD FOLK.

Pan led a merrier life than all the other gods together. He was beloved alike by shepherds and countrymen, and by the fauns and satyrs, birds and beasts, of his own kingdom. The care of flocks and herds was his, and for home he had all the world of woods and waters; he was lord of everything out of doors! Yet he felt the burden of it no more than he felt the shadow of a leaf when he danced, but spent the days in laughter and music among his fellows. Like him, the fauns and satyrs had furry, pointed ears, and little horns that sprouted above their brows; in fact, they were all enough like wild creatures to seem no strangers to anything untamed. They slept in the sun, piped in the shade, and lived on wild grapes and the nuts that every squirrel was ready to share with them.

The woods were never lonely. A man might wander away into those solitudes and think himself friendless; but here and there a river knew, and a tree could tell, a story of its own. Beautiful creatures they were, that for one reason or another had left off human shape. Some had been transformed against their will, that they might do no more harm to their fellow men. Some were changed through the pity of the gods, that they might share the simple life of Pan, mindless of mortal cares, glad in rain and sunshine, and always close to the heart of the Earth... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books