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The Old Willow Tree and Other Stories   By: (1856-1908)

The Old Willow Tree and Other Stories by Carl Ewald

First Page:

The Old Willow tree

and other stories by

CARL EWALD

Translated by A. Teixeira de Mattos

Drawings by Helen M. Jacobs & G. E. Lee

[Illustration]

Thornton Butterworth Limited 15 Bedford St Strand London. W. C. 2

First published October, 1921.

Copyright U.S.A., 1907, by Charles Scribner's Sons.

THE ROYAL ROAD LIBRARY

THE OLD WILLOW TREE AND OTHER STORIES

THE ROYAL ROAD LIBRARY

THE CARL EWALD BOOKS

Translated by ALEXANDER TEIXEIRA DE MATTOS

1. TWO LEGS 2. THE OLD WILLOW TREE and other stories

THE NETTA SYRETT BOOKS

3. TOBY & THE ODD BEASTS 4. RACHEL & THE SEVEN WONDERS

THE W. H. KOEBEL BOOKS

5. THE BUTTERFLIES' DAY

[Illustration: 'YOU HAVE DISTURBED MY AFTERNOON NAP']

FOR THE HONBLE. MRS. HENRY MCLAREN.

DEAR CHRISTABEL,

From the first, your interest in Carl Ewald has been kindly, gracious and insistent; as Michael Finsbury might have said, "you were his friend through thick and thin;" and it is very much due to you (not to mention Betty and Charles) that this volume has seen the light of day. Most of the stories are new to this country; and I dedicate my translation to you in all gratitude.

A. T. DE M.

CHELSEA, 23 September, 1921 .

[Illustration: List of Stories]

CHAPTER I Page

THE OLD WILLOW TREE 13

CHAPTER II

THE MISTLETOE 47

CHAPTER III

THE LILAC BUSH 59

CHAPTER IV

THE BEECH AND THE OAK 69

CHAPTER V

THE WEEDS 81

CHAPTER VI

THE ANEMONES 89

CHAPTER VII

THE WOOD AND THE HEATH 101

CHAPTER VIII

SOMEWHERE IN THE WOOD 111

CHAPTER IX

THE COUSINS 123

[Illustration: List of Pictures]

'You have disturbed my afternoon nap' ( Coloured ) Frontispiece.

'I want to pick some for myself!' ( Coloured ) 40

The old dog stood on his hind legs and blinked with his blind eyes 50

'You really ought not to be so wasteful with your leaves, old friend,' said the bear, licking his paws 70

'Hide me! Save me!' ( Coloured ) 80

'Fie, for shame!' they cried to the beech leaves. 'It's you that are killing us' 94

'Good bye,' said the maiden pink 114

There sat the mouse in the sugar basin ( Coloured ) 128

[Illustration: The Old Willow tree]

I

There are many kinds of willows and they are so unlike that you would hardly believe them to be relations.

There are some so small and wretched that they creep along the ground. They live on the heath, or high up in the mountains, or in the cold arctic regions. In the winter, they are quite hidden under the snow; in the summer, they just poke up their noses above the tops of the heather.

There are people who shrink from notice because they are so badly off. It is simply stupid to be ashamed of being poor; and the little dwarf willows are not a bit ashamed. But they know that the soil they grow in is so poor that they can never attain the height of proper trees. If they tried to shoot up and began to carry their heads like their stately cousins the poplars, they would soon learn the difference.

For the poplars are their cousins. They are the stateliest of all the willow trees and they know it, as any one can see by looking at them with half an eye... Continue reading book >>




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