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Opening Ceremonies of the New York and Brooklyn Bridge, May 24, 1883   By: (1850-1916)

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First Page:

[Illustration]

OPENING CEREMONIES

OF THE

NEW YORK AND BROOKLYN BRIDGE

MAY 24, 1883.

BROOKLYN, N.Y.

1883.

PRESS OF

THE BROOKLYN EAGLE JOB PRINTING DEPARTMENT.

TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS

OF THE

NEW YORK AND BROOKLYN BRIDGE.

TRUSTEES.

NEW YORK.

JOHN T. AGNEW, JOHN G. DAVIS, J. ADRIANCE BUSH, HENRY CLAUSEN, THOMAS C. CLARKE, CHARLES MACDONALD, H.K. THURBER, JENKINS VAN SCHAICK, FRANKLIN EDSON, Mayor, Ex officio . ALLAN CAMPBELL, Comp., Ex officio .

BROOKLYN.

WILLIAM C. KINGSLEY, WILLIAM MARSHALL, HENRY W. SLOCUM, JAMES S.T. STRANAHAN, ALFRED C. BARNES, ALDEN S. SWAN, OTTO WITTE, JAMES HOWELL, SETH LOW, Mayor, Ex officio . AARON BRINKERHOFF, Comp., Ex officio .

JOHN T. AGNEW, Chairman Executive Committee.

OFFICERS.

WILLIAM C. KINGSLEY, President. J. ADRIANCE BUSH, Vice Pres. OTTO WITTE, Treasurer. ORESTES P. QUINTARD, Secretary.

CHIEF ENGINEER.

WASHINGTON A. ROEBLING.

ASSISTANT ENGINEERS.

CHARLES C. MARTIN, FRANCIS COLLINGWOOD, SAMUEL R. PROBASCO, WILLIAM H. PAINE, GEORGE W. McNULTY, WILHELM HILDENBRAND.

PROGRAMME OF EXERCISES.

1. MUSIC

23d REGIMENT BAND.

2. PRAYER

Rt. Rev. BISHOP LITTLEJOHN.

3. PRESENTATION ADDRESS

On behalf of Trustees, WILLIAM C. KINGSLEY, Vice President.

4. ACCEPTANCE ADDRESS

On behalf of the City of Brooklyn, Hon. SETH LOW, Mayor.

5. ACCEPTANCE ADDRESS

On behalf of the City of New York, Hon. FRANKLIN EDSON, Mayor.

CORNET SOLO

Mr. J. LEVY.

6. ORATION

Hon. ABRAM S. HEWITT.

7. ORATION

Rev. RICHARD S. STORRS, D.D.

8. MUSIC

7th REGIMENT BAND.

Hon. JAMES S.T. STRANAHAN will preside.

INTRODUCTORY.

The New York and Brooklyn Bridge was formally opened on Thursday, May 24th, 1883, with befitting pomp and ceremonial, in the presence of the largest multitude that ever gathered in the two cities. From the announcement by the Trustees of the date which was to mark the turning over of the work to the public, it was evident that the popular demonstration would be upon a scale commensurate with the magnificence of the structure and its importance to the people of the United States. The evidences of widespread and profound interest in the event were early and unmistakable. They were not confined to the metropolis and its sister city on the Long Island shore, nor yet to the majestic Empire State. The occurrence was recognized as one of National importance; and throughout the Union, from the rocky headlands of Maine to the golden shores of the Pacific, and from the gleaming waters of the St. Lawrence to the vast expanse of the Mexican Gulf, the opening ceremonies were regarded with intelligent concern and approval. Nearly every State contributed its representatives to the swelling throng that attended, while those who were unable to be present contemplated with pride and satisfaction the completion and consecration to its purpose of the greatest engineering work of modern times.

In the communities most directly benefited by the Bridge the demonstration was confined to no class or body of the populace. It was a holiday for high and low, rich and poor; it was, in fact, the People's Day. More delightful weather never dawned upon a festal morning. The heavens were radiant with the celestial blue of approaching summer; silvery fragments of cloud sailed gracefully across the firmament like winged messengers, bearing greetings of work well done; the clearest of spring sunshine tinged everything with a touch of gold, and a brisk, bracing breeze blown up from the Atlantic cooled the atmosphere to a healthful and invigorating temperature. The incoming dawn revealed the twin cities gorgeous in gala attire. From towering steeple and lofty fa├žade, from the fronts of business houses and the cornices and walls of private dwellings, from the forests of shipping along the wharves and the vessels in the dimpled bay, floated bunting fashioned in every conceivable design, while high above all, from the massive and enduring granite towers of the Bridge the Stars and Stripes signaled to the world from the gateway of the continent the arrival of the auspicious day... Continue reading book >>




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