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Organic Syntheses   By: (1893-1978)

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ORGANIC SYNTHESES

AN ANNUAL PUBLICATION OF SATISFACTORY METHODS FOR THE PREPARATION OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS

EDITORIAL BOARD

JAMES BRYANT CONANT, Editor in Chief HANS THACHER CLARKE ROGER ADAMS OLIVER KAMM

CONTRIBUTORS G. H. COLEMAN J, C. HESSLER E. P. KOHLER C. S. MARVEL W. A. NOYES G. R. ROBERTSON E. B. VLIET F. C. WHITMORE

VOL. II.

Caveat: Some numbers did not OCR correctly and may not have been corrected during the proofing! Check the 1941 print edition before trying these!

INTRODUCTION TO THE SERIES

THE publication of this series of pamphlets has been undertaken to make available in a permanent form complete detailed directions for the preparation of various organic chemical reagents. In announcing this purpose it may be well to mention at the outset some of the difficulties in the way of the research chemist, which it is hoped this series will be able to overcome. The cost of chemicals is prohibitive to the majority of chemists; this was true before the war when Kahlbaum's complete supply was available, and to day with our dependence on domestic stocks, this cost has increased. The delay in obtaining chemicals, especially from abroad, even if the expense need not be considered, is an important factor. These difficulties have therefore thrown the research chemist on his own resources. The preparation of materials for research, always time consuming and annoying, is made increasingly so by the inexactness of the published information which so often omits essential details. Because of this, much needless experimentation is necessary in order to obtain the results given in the published reports. As the additional information thus acquired is seldom published, duplication of such experiments occurs again and again, a waste of time and material. It is hoped these difficulties may be remedied by the publication of this series of pamphlets. In other words, the authors hope to make this a clearing house for the exchange of information as to methods of preparation of some of the most needed organic chemical reagents.

On account of the impossibility of obtaining the less common organic chemicals in the United States during the past few years, university laboratories have had no option but to prepare their own supplies. At the University of Illinois, for instance, a special study has been made of this field, and methods for the production of various substances have been investigated. As a result, reliable methods and directions have been developed for producing the materials in one half to five pound lots. Such work as Illinois has done is now being given an even more extensive scope at the Research Laboratory of the Eastman Kodak Company. It is felt that the results from these various laboratories should be available to all chemists and it is hoped that they eventually will be completely incorporated in these pamphlets.

The organic chemicals herein discussed have been quite arbitrarily chosen, being those which have been needed in various research laboratories in the last years and for which the directions happen now to be ready for publication. The methods are in only a few cases new ones; they are in general the most satisfactory to be found in the literature. Only such details have been added as will enable a man with a reasonable amount of experience in organic chemistry to duplicate the results without difficulty. To be absolutely sure that each set of directions can be repeated, every experiment has been carried out in at least two laboratories. Only after exact duplication of the results in both laboratories are the directions considered ready for publication... Continue reading book >>




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