Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Our Battery The Journal of Company B, 1st O.V.A.   By:

Book cover

First Page:

OUR BATTERY; OR THE JOURNAL OF COMPANY B, 1st O. V. A.,

BY O. P. CUTTER.

CLEVELAND, OHIO: NEVINS' BOOK AND JOB PRINTING ESTABLISHMENT. 1864.

DEDICATION.

To COLONEL JAMES BARNETT, commanding the First Ohio Artillery, than whom a braver, or kinder hearted man to the soldier does not exist, this humble work is respectfully inscribed by his friend,

THE AUTHOR.

AUTHOR'S NOTE. This little work was hastily written during the leisures of Camp Life, and without any intention of ever putting it in print. But, by the urgent entreaties of his companions in arms, the author has finally concluded to risk it incomplete though it be in the hands of a generous public.

OUR BATTERY.

CHAPTER I.

In accordance with the Proclamation of President Lincoln, calling out troops for three years, or during the war which in future history will be better known as the great Southern Rebellion a Regiment of Light Artillery was at once organized in this State, and the command given to COL. JAMES BARNETT, of Cleveland, than whom no person was more qualified for the position. For many years previous to the present outbreak he had interested himself in the study of Artillery, and for some time commanded a battery in this city, which, under his skillful management, became highly proficient.

Of the batteries composing the above regiment, Co. B, of which we are about to give the Journal, was the second organized, and W. E. Standart elected Captain, and J. A. Bennett and J. H. Sypher as First Lieutenants, and N. A. Baldwin and E. P. Sturges for Second Lieutenants. All the commissioned officers and a portion of the non commissioned and privates, were residents of Cleveland or its vicinity.

On Thursday, September 4th, 1861, the company having been recruited to the maximum number, we took our departure from Cleveland. A large number of relatives and friends had assembled at the depot to see us off. At 2.40 P. M., the train on which we embarked moved slowly out of the depot amid the cheers of the people. At Grafton, Wellington, and other points along the road, we were joined by a large number of recruits, who had enlisted in these and surrounding towns. Many of their friends and relatives were present to bid the bold "soger boys" good bye. Early the same evening we arrived at Columbus, were delayed for an hour, then got under way, and reached Camp Dennison the following morning, when we at once formed in line and marched to our quarters.

At Camp Dennison commenced our first experience of a soldier's life. We were quartered in shanties built for the purpose, eight or ten persons to each. The first day was passed in looking around the Camp. The next, we had guard mounting, and were given the order of the day. Each day we were twice drilled, and soon became quite proficient in handling the guns. A few days after arriving at Camp we were regularly mustered into the United States' service, when we received our clothing and equipments, and now pitched our tents for the first time, in a beautiful grove about one mile from our old quarters. The horses, harness, and other necessary articles soon arrived, and on the 5th of October orders were received to hold ourselves in readiness to march at an hours' notice. Each member of the battery was assigned his position, and all was got in readiness to march.

On Sunday morning following, the order was given to strike tents, harness horses, and be prepared to march without delay; and, although it was then raining heavily, no time was lost. Every one was actively engaged in getting ready. Soon came word to move, but some of our horses were inclined to disobey orders, as they refused to proceed. Camp life had not been without its charms to them; they had no inclination to give up "going to grass," so soon; but, after considerable coaxing, and a little "persuasive force," we were finally on the road, and with but little adventure, aside from our horses being once or twice stalled in the mud, we reached Cincinnati... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books