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Out on the Pampas Or, The Young Settlers   By: (1832-1902)

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[Illustration: Book Cover]

[Illustration: The Fight with the Puma. Page 59. ]

OUT ON THE PAMPAS

OR

THE YOUNG SETTLERS

BY

G. A. HENTY

AUTHOR OF 'THE YOUNG FRANC TIREURS,' 'THE YOUNG BUGLERS,' 'THE MARCH TO MAGDALA,' ETC. ETC.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY J. B. ZWECKER.

LONDON GRIFFITH FARRAN & CO. NEWBERY HOUSE, 39 CHARING CROSS ROAD

[ The Rights of Translation and Reproduction are Reserved. ]

Transcriber's Note: Variations in hyphenation, capitalization, and spelling have been retained as in the original. Minor printer errors have been amended without note. Obvious typos have been amended and are listed at the end of the text. Table of Contents has been added. OE/oe ligatures have not been retained in this version.

Table of Contents.

CHAPTER I. Mrs. Hardy's Resolution.

CHAPTER II. The Start.

CHAPTER III. A New Life.

CHAPTER IV. The Pampas.

CHAPTER V. The Settler's Home.

CHAPTER VI. A Tale of the Mexican War.

CHAPTER VII. Seth Continues His Narrative of the Mexican Adventure.

CHAPTER VIII. Farm Work and Amusements.

CHAPTER IX. Neighbourly Visits and Advice.

CHAPTER X. The Lost Cattle.

CHAPTER XI. Quiet Times.

CHAPTER XII. A Steady Hand.

CHAPTER XIII. The Indian Attack.

CHAPTER XIV. Terrible News.

CHAPTER XV. The Pampas on Fire.

CHAPTER XVI. At the Stake.

CHAPTER XVII. Rescued.

CHAPTER XVIII. And Last.

OUT ON THE PAMPAS;

OR,

THE YOUNG SETTLERS.

CHAPTER I.

MRS. HARDY'S RESOLUTION.

'What are you thinking of, Frank?' Mrs. Hardy asked her husband one evening, after an unusually long silence on his part.

'Well, my dear, I was thinking of a good many things. In the first place, I think, I began with wondering what I should make of the boys; and that led to such a train of thoughts about ourselves and our circumstances, that I hardly knew where I was when you spoke to me.'

Mr. Hardy spoke cheerfully, but his wife saw at once that it was with an effort that he did so. She put down the work upon which she was engaged, and moved her chair nearer to his by the fire. 'It is a serious question, Frank, about the boys. Charley is fifteen now, and Hubert fourteen. I wonder myself sometimes what we shall do with them.'

'There seems no opening here in England for young fellows. The professions are crowded, even if they were not altogether beyond our means; and as to a clerkship, they had better have a trade, and stick to it: they would be far happier, and nearly as well paid. The fact is, Clara,' and here Mr. Hardy paused a little, as if to gain courage to say what he feared would be very disagreeable to his wife, 'the fact is, we are altogether too crowded here. The best thing for the children, by far, and I think the best thing for ourselves, would be to emigrate.'

Mrs. Hardy gave a little sigh, but said nothing, and sat looking quietly into the fire, as her husband went on: 'You see, my dear, I am just, and only just earning enough for us to live upon. Nor is there any strong probability of an increase of business. The boys, as you say, are growing up, and I see no prospect of giving them a fair start in life. Abroad it is altogether different: we can buy land and stock it for next to nothing. We should live roughly, certainly; but at least there is no fear for the future, and we should start our boys in life with a fair certainty of success. Still, Clara, I do not of course mean that I have made up my mind upon the subject. It is far too serious a matter to decide upon hastily. I only threw out the suggestion; and if you, after thinking it over, are against it, there is an end of the matter.'

Mrs. Hardy was silent for a little, and a tear sparkled on her cheek in the fire light; then she said, 'I am not surprised, Frank, at what you have said. In fact I have expected it for some time. I have observed you looking over books upon foreign countries, and have seen that you often sat thoughtful and quiet. I guessed, therefore, what you had in your mind. Of course, dear, as a woman, I shrink from the thought of leaving all our friends and going to quite a strange country, but I don't think that I am afraid of the hardships or discomfort... Continue reading book >>




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