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Pan Tadeusz Or, the Last Foray in Lithuania; a Story of Life Among Polish Gentlefolk in the Years 1811 and 1812   By: (1798-1855)

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PAN TADEUSZ

OR

THE LAST FORAY IN LITHUANIA

All rights reserved

PAN TADEUSZ

OR

THE LAST FORAY IN LITHUANIA

A STORY OF LIFE AMONG POLISH GENTLEFOLK

IN THE YEARS 1811 AND 1812

IN TWELVE BOOKS

BY

ADAM MICKIEWICZ

TRANSLATED FROM THE POLISH BY

GEORGE RAPALL NOYES

1917

LONDON AND TORONTO

J. M. DENT & SONS LTD.

PARIS: J. M. DENT ET FILS

NEW YORK: E. P. DUTTON & CO.

CONTENTS

PREFACE INTRODUCTION LIST OF THE PRINCIPAL CHARACTERS IN "PAN TADEUSZ" WITH NOTES ON POLISH PRONUNCIATION BOOK I. THE FARM BOOK II. THE CASTLE BOOK III. FLIRTATION BOOK IV DIPLOMACY AND THE CHASE BOOK V. THE BRAWL BOOK VI. THE HAMLET BOOK VII. THE CONSULTATION BOOK VIII. THE FORAY BOOK IX. THE BATTLE BOOK X THE EMIGRATION. JACEK BOOK XI. THE YEAR 1812 BOOK XII. LET US LOVE ONE ANOTHER! NOTES

PREFACE

THE present translation of Pan Tadeusz is based on the editions of Biegeleisen (Lemberg, 1893) and Kallenbach (Brody, 1911). I have had constantly by me the German translation by Lipiner (ed. 2, Leipzig, 1898) and the French translation by Ostrowski (ed. 4, Paris, 1859), and am deeply indebted to them. The English translation by Miss Maude Ashurst Biggs ( Master Thaddeus; or, The Last Foray in Lithuania : London, 1885) I did not have at hand until my own version was nearly complete; after that I consulted it only very rarely. I do not think that I am under obligation to it in more than a half dozen scattered lines of my text. (Perhaps, however, my use of foray as a translation of zajazd is due to an unconscious recollection of the title of Miss Biggs's volumes, which I looked over several years ago, before I had even formed the plan of my own work.) In my notes, however, my debt to Miss Biggs and her collaborators in her commentary on Pan Tadeusz is important; I have striven to indicate it distinctly, and I thank Miss Biggs heartily for her kind permission to make use of her work.

To my friend Miss Mary Helen Sznyter I am grateful for aid and advice in the rendering of several puzzling passages. But my greatest debt I owe to my wife, whose name, if justice were done, should be added to my own as joint translator of the volume. Though she is entirely unacquainted with the Polish language, nearly every page of the book in its phrasing bears traces of her correcting hand. The preparation of the volume for the press and the reading of the proof have been made easy by her skilful help.

BERKELEY, CALIFORNIA,

December 9 , 1916.

INTRODUCTION

"No European nation of our day has such an epic as Pan Tadeusz . In it Don Quixote has been fused with the Iliad . The poet stood on the border line between a vanishing generation and our own. Before they died, he had seen them; but now they are no more. That is precisely the epic point of view. Mickiewicz has performed his task with a master's hand; he has made immortal a dead generation, which now will never pass away. {~HORIZONTAL ELLIPSIS~} Pan Tadeusz is a true epic. No more can be said or need be said."(1)

This verdict upon the great masterpiece of all Slavic poetry, written a few years after its appearance, by Zygmunt Krasinski, one of Mickiewicz's two great successors in the field of Polish letters, has been confirmed by the judgment of posterity. For the chapter on Pan Tadeusz by George Brandes, than whom there have been few more competent judges of modern European literature, is little more than an expansion of Krasinski's pithy sentences... Continue reading book >>




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