Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

"Pip" A Romance of Youth   By: (1876-1952)

First Page:

"PIP" A ROMANCE OF YOUTH

"PIP" A ROMANCE OF YOUTH

BY IAN HAY

[Illustration]

BOSTON AND NEW YORK HOUGHTON MIFFLIN COMPANY The Riverside Press Cambridge 1917

CONTENTS

BOOK ONE "FIRST, THE INFANT ..."

I. THE PHILANTHROPISTS 3 II. MR. POCKLINGTON'S 24 III. "HAM" 54 IV. PIP FINDS HIS VOCATION 74 V. LINKLATER 103 VI. PETTICOAT INFLUENCE 155

BOOK TWO THE MAKING OF A MAN

VII. A CRICKET WEEK 181 VIII. LIFE AT FIRST HAND 233 IX. THE PRINCIPAL BOY: AN INTERLUDE 256

BOOK THREE

THE JOURNEY'S END

X. AN ANCIENT GAME 299 XI. " NATURAM FURCA EXPELLAS ..." 329 XII. "... TAMEN USQUE RECURRET " 351

"PIP"

BOOK ONE

"FIRST, THE INFANT ..."

"PIP"

CHAPTER I

THE PHILANTHROPISTS

IT was to Pipette that the idea originally occurred, but it was upon Pip that parental retribution subsequently fell, Pipette being merely dismissed with a caution. This clemency was due chiefly to the intercession of Cook, who stated, in the rĂ´le of principal witness, that the "poor lamb" (Pipette) "could never have thought of such a thing by herself." This in spite of the poor lamb's indignant protests to the contrary. In this matter, as in many others, Cook showed both personal bias and want of judgment; for Pipette was as sharp as a needle, while Pip, though a willing accomplice and a philosophical scapegoat, was lacking in constructive ability and organising power.

But we have somehow begun at the end of the story, so must make a fresh start.

The Consulting Room, which was strictly out of bounds (and consequently a favourite resort of the children when the big, silent man, who kissed them twice a day, was out), contained many absorbingly interesting and mysterious objects, whose uses Pip and Pipette were dying to know. For instance, there was the Oven Door. It was set in the wall near the fireplace, miles up, quite five feet, and was exactly like the oven in the kitchen, except that it was green instead of black. Also, it had a beautiful gold handle. It was not hot, though, for one day Pip climbed on a chair to feel; neither did it open, for he was unable to turn the handle.

They had asked Mr. Evans about it, and he had informed them that it was a place to put bad little boys and girls in. But that was on a day when Mr. Evans was cross, having just had words with Cook about the disgraceful delay between the fish and joint at last night's dinner. Pipette, therefore, outwardly incredulous but inwardly quaking, appealed to Cook, and asked confidentially if the strange thing were not an oven; whereupon Cook embraced her and presented her with an apple, and wondered what the little precious would get into her poor head next, adding as an afterthought that Mr. Evans ought to be ashamed of himself. Pipette was so pleased with the apple and the task of conveying Cook's message to Mr. Evans's pantry this was the name of the place where he lived; there was a delightful thing there called the Filter, with a little tap that you could turn on if no one was looking that she quite forgot to ask what the Oven Door really was; so the mystery remained unsolved for many a day... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books