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Pipistrellus cinnamomeus Miller 1902 Referred to the Genus Myotis   By: (1902-1986)

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Pipistrellus cinnamomeus Miller 1902 Referred to the Genus Myotis

BY

E. RAYMOND HALL and WALTER W. DALQUEST

University of Kansas Publications Museum of Natural History

Volume 1, No. 25, pp. 581 590, 5 figures in text January 20, 1950

University of Kansas LAWRENCE 1950

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PUBLICATIONS, MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Editors: E. Raymond Hall, Chairman, Edward H. Taylor, A. Byron Leonard, Robert W. Wilson

Volume 1, No. 25, pp. 581 590, 5 figures in text January 20, 1950

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS Lawrence, Kansas

PRINTED BY FERD VOILAND. JR., STATE PRINTER TOPEKA, KANSAS 1950

23 1545

[Transcriber's Note: Words surrounded by tildes, like ~this~ signifies words in bold. Words surrounded by underscores, like this , signifies words in italics. Male symbol is shown as [M] and female symbol is [F].]

Pipistrellus cinnamomeus Miller 1902 Referred to the Genus Myotis

By

E. RAYMOND HALL AND WALTER W. DALQUEST

Miller (Proc. Acad. Nat. Sci. Philadelphia, 1902, p. 390, September 3,1902) based the name Pipistrellus cinnamomeus on a skin and skull of a vespertilionid bat obtained on May 4, 1900, at Montecristo, Tabasco, Mexico, by E. W. Nelson and E. A. Goldman. A single specimen was available to Miller when he proposed the name P. cinnamomeus . Dalquest and Hall (Jour. Mamm., 29:180, May 14, 1948) reported three additional specimens collected in 1946 by W. W. Dalquest on the Río Blanco, twenty kilometers west northwest of Piedras Negras, Veracruz, Mexico. No other published information concerning this species is known to us, although the name has, of course, appeared in regional lists, for example in the "List of North American Recent Mammals, 1923" (Bull. U. S. National Museum, 128:75, April 29, 1924) by Gerrit S. Miller, Jr.

Additional specimens, nevertheless, are known. Two collected on April 18 and 20, 1903, at Papayo, Guerrero, by Nelson and Goldman, are in the Biological Surveys Collection in the United States National Museum. A skin, probably of this species, for which the skull cannot now be found, was taken on October 27, 1904, at Esquinapa, Sinaloa, by J. H. Batty and is in the American Museum of Natural History. This is the skin referred by Miller and Allen (Bull. U. S. Nat. Mus., 144:100, May 25, 1928) to Myotis occultus . Three additional specimens, each a skin with skull, were collected twenty kilometers east northeast of Jesús Carranza, at 200 feet elevation, Veracruz, by Walter W. Dalquest, two on April 13, 1949, and one on May 16 of the same year. These are in the Museum of Natural History of the University of Kansas, as also are the three previously reported by Dalquest and Hall ( loc. cit. ). A total of ten specimens, from five localities, all in Mexico, thus is accounted for.

On page 392 of the original description which our study of the holotype shows to be accurate Miller wrote: "This bat differs so widely from the other known American species of Pipistrellus as to need no special comparisons. Superficially it has much the appearance of an unusually red Myotis lucifugus , and only on examination of the teeth do the animal's true relationships become apparent." In referring to the teeth Miller almost certainly was thinking of the premolars of which there are only two on each side of the upper jaw and on each side of the lower jaw in Pipistrellus , including his Pipistrellus cinnamomeus , whereas Myotis at that time was thought always to have three premolars on each side of both the upper and lower jaw, except in rare instances where one premolar might be lacking on one side of one jaw or even more rarely on both sides of the upper jaw. In his original description of P. cinnamomeus , Miller mentioned also that it had the "Inner upper incisor distinctly smaller than the outer, not approximately equal to it as is the case in P. subflavus ."

At this point it is well to make clear that each of the genera Pipistrellus and Myotis contains a large number of species and that the differences between the two genera are few... Continue reading book >>




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