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Practical Rules for the Management of a Locomotive Engine in the Station, on the Road, and in cases of Accident   By: (1817-1898)

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First Page:

OF A LOCOMOTIVE ENGINE

Transcribed from the 1841 edition by David Price, ccx074@pglaf.org

PRACTICAL RULES FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF A LOCOMOTIVE ENGINE: IN THE STATION, ON THE ROAD, AND IN CASES OF ACCIDENT.

BY CHARLES HUTTON GREGORY, CIVIL ENGINEER.

PREFACE.

The substance of the following pages was written several months since, and subsequently sent to the Institution of Civil Engineers, where it was read in abstract on the 16th of February in the present session.

While our Engineering Literature contains several valuable Treatises on the Theory and Construction of the Locomotive Engine, it has, as yet, produced no work illustrating its Use. This circumstance, added to the recommendation of several competent authorities, has induced the writer to apply to the Council of the Institution of Civil Engineers for permission to lay before the public these Practical Rules for the Management of a Locomotive Engine, drawn up from individual experience, in the hope that they may be acceptable, at a period when any subject connected with the efficiency and safety of Railway travelling is deservedly engaging attention.

At the end of the Paper will be found some Regulations for the first appointment of Engine men, adopted by the Directors of the London and Croydon Railway, and framed by the writer in his official capacity as their Resident Engineer. Also, a Table of Railway Velocities, indicated by the time occupied in passing over given distances, which he has frequently found to save him the trouble of calculation, and which he hopes may be similarly useful to others.

CHARLES HUTTON GREGORY.

London, March, 1841.

PRACTICAL RULES, &c.

THE MANAGEMENT OF A LOCOMOTIVE ENGINE IN THE STATION.

The careful examination of a Locomotive Engine when in the Station, and its judicious management while running, are essential to the full performance of its duty, and to ensure the safety of the passengers by the train.

While an Engine is stopping at the Station before a trip, the fire should be properly kept up, the tubes clear at both ends, and the fire bars picked free from clinkers: the regulator should be closed and locked, the tender break screwed down tight, the reversing lever fixed in the middle position, so that the slides may be out of gear, the cocks of the oil vessels and feed pipes turned off, and the steam blowing off from the safety valve at a pressure of 35 lbs. per square inch; if blowing off in any excess, the waste steam may be turned into the Tender cistern to heat the water, and the door of the smoke box may be opened to check the fire, but it should be fastened up again 10 or 15 minutes before the time of starting.

Before an Engine starts with a train, the attention of the Engine man should first be directed to its being in complete working order; with this view he should go beneath the Engine, and carefully examine the working gear in detail.

The connecting rod is a very important part, and more liable perhaps than any other to fail for want of proper examination. The cotters must be secure, and in case the brasses have too much play they must be tightened up; observing, however, that brasses should never be set so hard as to cause friction. If there are set screws at the side of the cotters, they should be tight, and all cotters should have a split pin at the bottom for greater security. The cotters which fasten the piston rods to the cross heads should be firm in their place, as well as the set screws, keys, or other connections, by which the feed pump pistons are secured to the piston rod.

The brasses of the inner framing which carry the inside bearings of the cranked axle must be examined, and any considerable play prevented by screwing them up if necessary. The wheels ought to be accurately square and firm on their axles, and the keys driven up tight... Continue reading book >>




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