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Prairie Farmer, Vol. 56: No. 4, January 26, 1884 A Weekly Journal for the Farm, Orchard and Fireside   By:

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First Page:

THE PRAIRIE FARMER

A Weekly Journal for

THE FARM, ORCHARD, AND FIRESIDE.

ESTABLISHED IN 1841. ENTIRE SERIES: VOL. 56 NO. 4.

CHICAGO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 26, 1884.

PRICE, $2.00 PER YEAR, IN ADVANCE.

[Transcriber's Note: The Table of Contents was originally located on page 56 of the periodical. It has been moved here for ease of use.]

THE CONTENTS OF THIS NUMBER.

AGRICULTURE Raising Onions, Page 49; Royalist 3d, 4500, 49; Illinois Tile Makers' Convention, 50 51; Better Management Needed, 51; Seed Corn from South, 51; Field and Furrow Items, 51.

LIVE STOCK Items, Page 52; Herd Books and Records, 52; Competing for Sweepstake Prizes, 52; Raising Young Mules, 52.

THE DAIRY Wisconsin Dairymen, Page 53.

VETERINARY Impaction of the Paunch, Page 53;

HORTICULTURE Lessons of 1883, Page 54; Illinois Hort. Society, 54; Diogenes in His Tub, 54 55; Possibilities of Cherry Growing, 55; Prunings, 55.

FLORICULTURE Gleanings by an Old Florist, Page 55.

EDITORIAL Items, Page 56; The Cost of Cold Winds, 56; Good Work at Washington, 56 57; Wisconsin Meetings, 57; Answers to Correspondents, 57; Wayside Notes, 57; Letter from Champaign, 57.

POULTRY NOTES Chicken Chat, Page 58; Chicken Houses, 58; Items, 58.

FORESTRY Items, Page 59.

SCIENTIFIC Official Weather Wisdom, Page 59; A Remarkable Electrical Discovery, 59; Items, 59.

HOUSEHOLD Christian Charity (Poetry), Page 60; Items, 60; The Night Cap, 60; How to Treat a Boy, 60; Pamphlets, Etc., Received, 60; Compiled Correspondence, 60.

YOUNG FOLKS Jule Fisher's Rescue, Page 61.

LITERATURE Between the Two Lights, Poem, Page 62; The Two Overcoats, 62.

HUMOROUS Bait of the Average Fisherman, Page 63; Whose Cold Feet, 63; Changed Relations, 63; It Makes a Difference, 63; Items, 63. Question Answered, 53.

NEWS OF THE WEEK Page 64.

MARKETS Page 64.

RAISING ONIONS.

There are two causes of failure to make this crop uncertain. One is because the soil is not kept clear of weeds, and the other is that it is not properly enriched. To raise a good crop of onions requires a light, loamy soil, worked into as fine a condition as possible, to render cultivation easy.

The greater part of the preparation should be done in the fall, and especially the application of the manure. Well rotted manure is the best, and that which is free from grass, oats, or weed seeds, should always be selected. Of course, if the manure is properly rotted the vitality of the larger portion of the seed in it will be killed, but unless this is done it will render the cultivation much more difficult. Stiff, clayey, or hard, poor land can be made a great deal better for the onion crop by a heavy application of ashes or well rotted bagasse. I prefer to apply ashes as a top dressing in the spring, working it in the surface, as I find by experience that they are not only valuable as a fertilizer when used in this way, but are also of great benefit in keeping down the weeds.

A plot of ground that is seeded with crab grass should not be selected, as the pulling up of the grass injures the growth of the onions. Onions feed near the surface; in fact, the larger portion of the bulb grows on top of the soil, and as a natural consequence the plant food should be well worked in the surface. Of course it is too late now to talk about fall preparation. If we want a crop of onions from seed this spring, whatever preparation there is must be done between now and seeding. I should plow or spade up the soil as soon as possible, if there is a thaw out either the last of this or any part of next month.

If you can save up and rot a supply of poultry manure and leaves, you can have the very best manure for a good onion crop.

Another important point in raising a good crop of onions is to have good seed and sow it early. The first favorable time in the spring must be taken advantage of, if you would have the best success with your crop. As good seed is necessary in any crop, so it is with onions. Test your seed before risking your entire crop, as by the time you plant once and fail, and procure seed and plant again, it will be too late to make a good crop... Continue reading book >>




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