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Raising P.V. Squabs for Profit   By:

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Raising P. V. Squabs for Profit

JOHN S. TRECARTIN Caldwell New Jersey

RAISING P. V. SQUABS FOR PROFIT

By JOHN S. TRECARTIN

A Manual of Instruction from My Personal Experience in Building, Stocking and Managing the Largest Successful Squab Plant in New Jersey

Tells how we market squabs for twelve dollars per dozen, wholesale.

Details of necessary requirements for a successful business.

How to house, feed, market and care for pigeons.

Importance of good foundation stock.

Profits and how secured.

COPYRIGHT 1920, JOHN S. TRECARTIN. CALDWELL, N.J.

CONTENTS

Page

Introduction 3

CHAPTER I.

Is There Profit in Raising Squabs? 5

CHAPTER II.

Description of Passaic Valley Squab Farm and Housing in General 7

CHAPTER III.

The Fundamental Requirements for Successful Squab Raising 10

CHAPTER IV.

The Utility Pigeon 17

CHAPTER V.

Habits and Peculiarities 20

CHAPTER VI.

Squabs for Market 24

CHAPTER VII.

Selecting Breeders 28

INTRODUCTION

The squab business in America has too long been looked upon as a pastime and game for children's amusement. Raising squabs is not child's play, but a real scientific business with unlimited possibilities for development.

Success in this business as in any other, depends largely on a proper start. In the following pages I will endeavor to present with great simplicity the right way to start in the squab business and the results I have obtained in raising squabs for market. The information contained herein, may, I trust, be of as much benefit to the reader as it is my pleasure to impart.

JOHN S. TRECARTIN.

[Illustration: PASSAIC VALLEY SQUAB FARM, CALDWELL, N.J.]

CHAPTER I.

IS THERE PROFIT IN RAISING SQUABS?

Of the question of profit in squab raising, there is no doubt. Squabs are coming into use more and more every day, not only as a delicacy for invalids, but also for hotels, restaurants, catering establishments, and household use.

The first question is naturally of the market for them. The Hebrews, who entertain lavishly, are among our largest customers. They buy the squabs alive, as their poultry has to be prepared according to the Jewish Dietary Laws. The hotels in all large cities use enormous quantities of squabs, and we have had to freeze large quantities for them in the summer in the past few years, so as to insure them a steady supply through the winter months. We have frozen as high as 5,000 squabs for a single hotel in one year, and now we make a practice of always keeping a reserve of frozen squabs, to meet the winter demands.

The prices of squabs are for the most part regulated by the large cities in the vicinity. Commission merchants are always anxious to buy in any quantity and they send out weekly quotations as to what they are paying for squabs. The prices to butchers, hotels, and consumers of all classes, are based on these quotations and naturally the direct sale to the consumer, cutting out the commission man, commands a much higher price.

The following table is made up of the quotations Conron Bros., New York City, paid for squabs during the first week in January in the following years:

1912 Squabs weighing 9 lbs. to the dozen $ 4.75 1913 " " 9 lbs. " " 4.75 1914 " " 9 lbs. " " 4.75 1916 " " 9 lbs. " " 5.50 1919 " " 9 lbs. " " 9.25 1920 " " 9 lbs. " " 11.00

Squabs are graded according to the weight of one dozen. That is, one dozen squabs weighing twelve ounces each, would weigh nine pounds to the dozen. We have taken that weight squab as a basis, as that is the average weight squab produced from good breeders... Continue reading book >>




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