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Rick Dale, A Story of the Northwest Coast   By: (1850-1930)

Rick Dale, A Story of the Northwest Coast by Kirk Munroe

First Page:

RICK DALE

A STORY OF THE NORTHWEST COAST

BY KIRK MUNROE

AUTHOR OF "SNOW SHOES AND SLEDGES" "THE FUR SEAL'S TOOTH" THE "MATES" SERIES ETC.

ILLUSTRATED BY W. A. ROGERS

NEW YORK AND LONDON HARPER & BROTHERS PUBLISHERS

[Illustration: THE ICE ABOVE GIBRALTAR]

CONTENTS

I. A POOR RICH BOY

II. THE RUNAWAY

III. ALARIC TAKES A FIRST LESSON

IV. THE "EMPRESS" LOSES A PASSENGER

V. FIRST MATE BONNY BROOKS

VI. PREPARING TO BE A SAILOR

VII. CAPTAIN DUFF, OF THE SLOOP "FANCY"

VIII. AN UNLUCKY SMASH

IX. "CHINKS" AND "DOPE"

X. PUGET SOUND SMUGGLERS

XI. A VERY TRYING EXPERIENCE

XII. A LESSON IN KEDGING

XIII. CHASING A MYSTERIOUS LIGHT

XIV. BONNY'S INVENTION, AND HOW IT WORKED

XV. CAPTURED BY A REVENUE CUTTER

XVI. ESCAPE OF THE FIRST MATE AND CREW

XVII. SAVED BY A LITTLE SIWASH KID

XVIII. LIFE IN SKOOKUM JOHN'S CAMP

XIX. A TREACHEROUS INDIAN FROM NEAH BAY

XX. AN EXCITING RACE FOR LIBERTY

XXI. A CASE OF MISTAKEN IDENTITY

XXII. TWO SHORT BUT EXCITING VOYAGES

XXIII. ALARIC TODD'S DARKEST HOUR

XXIV. PHIL RYDER PAYS A DEBT

XXV. ENGAGED TO INTERPRET FOR THE FRENCH

XXVI. PREPARING FOR AN ASCENT

XXVII. BONNY COMMANDS THE SITUATION

XXVIII. ON THE EDGE OF PARADISE VALLEY

XXIX. MOUNT RAINIER PLACED UNDERFOOT

XXX. BLOWN FROM THE RIM OF A CRATER

XXXI. A DESPERATE SITUATION

XXXII. HOW A SONG SAVED ALARIC'S LIFE

XXXIII. LAID UP FOR REPAIRS

XXXIV. CHASED BY A MADMAN

XXXV. A GANG OF FRIENDLY LOGGERS

XXXVI. IN A NORTHWEST LOGGING CAMP

XXXVII. WHAT IS A HUMP DURGIN?

XXXVIII. ALARIC AND BONNY AGAIN TAKE TO FLIGHT

XXXIX. BONNY DISCOVERS HIS FRIEND THE TRAMP

XL. A FLOOD OF LIGHT

ILLUSTRATIONS

THE ICE ABOVE GIBRALTAR

ALARIC MAKES HIS FIRST DECISION

"'VELL, I TELL YOU; I GIFS T'VENTY FIFE'"

BONNY'S INVENTION STARTED

THE ARRIVAL AT SKOOKUM JOHN'S

BONNY SEIZED A TRUCK, AND ALARIC A MATTRESS

"BONNY WAS JERKED BACKWARD"

"THEY WERE PARALYZED WITH TERROR"

RICK DALE

CHAPTER I

A POOR RICH BOY

Alaric Dale Todd was his name, and it was a great grief to him to be called "Allie." Allie Todd was so insignificant and sounded so weak. Besides, Allie was a regular girl's name, as he had been so often told, and expected to be told by each stranger who heard it for the first time. There is so much in a name, after all. We either strive to live up to it, or else it exerts a constant disheartening pull backward.

Although Alaric was tall for his age, which was nearly seventeen, he was thin, pale, and undeveloped. He did not look like a boy accustomed to play tennis or football, or engage in any of the splendid athletics that develop the muscle and self reliance of those sturdy young fellows who contest interscholastic matches. Nor was he one of these; so far from it, he had never played a game in his life except an occasional quiet game of croquet, or something equally soothing. He could not swim nor row nor sail a boat; he had never ridden horseback nor on a bicycle; he had never skated nor coasted nor hunted nor fished, and yet he was perfectly well formed and in good health. I fancy I hear my boy readers exclaim:

"What a regular muff your Alaric must have been! No wonder they called him 'Allie'!"

And the girls? Well, they would probably say, "What a disagreeable prig!" For Alaric knew a great deal more about places and people and books than most boys or girls of his age, and was rather fond of displaying this knowledge. And then he was always dressed with such faultless elegance. His patent leather boots were so shiny, his neckwear, selected with perfect taste, was so daintily arranged, and while he never left the house without drawing on a pair of gloves, they were always so immaculate that it did not seem as though he ever wore the same pair twice. He was very particular, too, about his linen, and often sent his shirts back to the laundress unworn because they were not done up to suit him. As for his coats and trousers, of which he had so many that it actually seemed as though he might wear a different suit every day in the year, he spent so much time in selecting material, and then in being fitted, and insisted on so many alterations, that his tailors were often in despair, and wondered whether it paid to have so particular a customer, after all... Continue reading book >>




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