Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

The Romance of the Coast   By: (1852-1891)

Book cover

First Page:

THE ROMANCE OF THE COAST.

by

JAMES RUNCIMAN.

[Illustration]

London: George Bell and Sons, York Street, Covent Garden. Chiswick Press: C. Whittingham and Co., Tooks Court, Chancery Lane.

1883.

To FREDERICK GREENWOOD,

THE EDITOR OF THE James's Gazette.

DEAR SIR,

I dedicate this little book to you. When you first gave me the chance of escaping from the unkindly work of political journalism, I used to think that your treatment of efforts which I thought extremely fine, was somewhat heartless. I am glad now that I have passed under your severe discipline, and I am proud to be one of the school of writers whose professional success is due to your help and training.

I am, Dear Sir,

Yours very faithfully,

JAMES RUNCIMAN.

CONTENTS.

PAGE

AN OLD SCHOOL PILOT 1

AN UGLY CONTRAST 6

THE FISHERWOMAN 11

THE VETERAN 16

THE HEROINE OF A FISHING VILLAGE 22

THE SILENT MEN 27

THE CABIN BOY 33

THE SQUIRE 40

THE VILLAGE PREACHER 47

THE FISHER'S FRIEND 52

THE COASTGUARD 57

THE SUSPECTED MAN 63

THE RABBIT CATCHER 68

THE GIANTS 79

THE COLLIER SKIPPER 85

IN THE BAY 90

THE SIBYL 96

A VOLUNTEER LIFE BRIGADE 102

KEELMEN 107

BLOWN NORTH 113

NORTH COUNTRY FISHERMEN 118

A LONG CHASE 126

HOB'S TOMMY 131

THE FAILURE 151

MR. CASELY 169

THE ROMANCE OF THE COAST.

AN OLD SCHOOL PILOT.

At the mouth of a north country river a colony of pilots dwelt. The men and women of this colony looked differently and spoke a dialect different from that used by the country people only half a mile off. The names, too, of the pilot community were different from those of the surrounding population. Tully was the most common surname of all, and the great number of people who bore it were mostly black eyed and dark haired, quite unlike our fair and blue eyed north country folk. Antiquaries say the Romans must have lived on the spot for at least two hundred years, judging by the coins and the vast quantities of household materials unearthed; and so some persons have no difficulty in accounting for the peculiarities of the pilot colony. Speculations of this sort are, however, somewhat beside the mark. It is only certain that the pilots lived amongst themselves, intermarried, and kept their habits and dialect quite distinct. When a pilot crossed the line a hundred yards west of his house, he met people who knew him by his tongue to be a "foreigner."

My particular friend among the pilots was a very big man, who used, to amuse us much by the childish gravity of his remarks. He was a remnant of a past generation, and the introduction of steam shocked his faculties beyond recovery. He would say: "In the old times, sir, vessels had to turn up here. It was back, fill, and shiver r r all the way; but now you might as well have sets of rails laid on the water and run the ships on them. There is no seamanship needed." He never quite forgave the Commissioners for deepening the river. As he said in his trenchant manner: "There used to be some credit in bringing a ship across the bar when you were never quite sure whether she would touch or not; but now you could bring the 'Duke of Wellington' in at low water... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books