Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Sex and Society   By: (1863-1947)

Book cover

First Page:

SEX AND SOCIETY

Studies in the Social Psychology of Sex

by

WILLIAM I. THOMAS

Associate Professor of Sociology in the University of Chicago

The University of Chicago Press Chicago, Illinois

1907 Fourth Impression 1913

AUTHOR'S NOTE

These studies have been published in various journals at different times. They are reprinted together because there is some demand for them, and they are not easily accessible. In preparing them for publication in the present form, some of them have been expanded and all of them have been revised.

While each study is complete in itself, the general thesis running through all of them is the same that the differences in bodily habit between men and women, particularly the greater strength, restlessness, and motor aptitude of man, and the more stationary condition of woman, have had an important influence on social forms and activities, and on the character and mind of the two sexes.

"Organic Differences in the Sexes" appeared in the American Journal of Sociology , III, 31ff., with the title, "On a Difference in the Metabolism of the Sexes;" "Sex and Primitive Social Control," ibid. , III, 754ff.; "Sex and Primitive Industry," ibid. , IV, 474ff.; "Sex and Primitive Morality," ibid. , IV, 774ff.; "The Psychology of Modesty and Clothing," ibid. , V, 246ff.; "The Adventitious Character of Woman," ibid. , XII, 32ff.; "The Mind of Woman and the Lower Races," ibid. , XII, 435ff.; "The Psychology of Exogamy," in the Zeitschrift für Socialwissenschaft , V, 1ff., with the title, "Der Ursprung der Exogamie;" "Sex and Social Feeling," in the Psychological Review , XI, 61ff., with the title, "The Sexual Element in Sensibility." Portions of a paper printed in the Forum , XXXVI, 305ff., with the title, "Is the Human Brain Stationary?" are incorporated in the paper on "The Mind of Woman and the Lower Races," and portions of a paper printed in the American Journal of Sociology , IX, 593ff., with the title, "The Psychology of Race Prejudice," are incorporated in the paper on "Sex and Social Feeling." I acknowledge the courtesy of the editors of these journals for permission to reprint.

W.I.T.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ORGANIC DIFFERENCES IN THE SEXES

SEX AND PRIMITIVE SOCIAL CONTROL

SEX AND SOCIAL FEELING

SEX AND PRIMITIVE INDUSTRY

SEX AND PRIMITIVE MORALITY

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF EXOGAMY

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF MODESTY AND CLOTHING

THE ADVENTITIOUS CHARACTER OF WOMAN

THE MIND OF WOMAN AND THE LOWER RACES

INDEX

ORGANIC DIFFERENCES IN THE SEXES

A grand difference between plant and animal life lies in the fact that the plant is concerned chiefly with storing energy, and the animal with consuming it. The plant by a very slow process converts lifeless into living matter, expending little energy and living at a profit. The animal is unable to change lifeless into living matter, but has developed organs of locomotion, ingestion, and digestion which enable it to prey upon the plant world and upon other animal forms; and in contrast with plant life it lives at a loss of energy. Expressed in biological formula, the habit of the plant is predominantly anabolic, that of the animal predominantly katabolic.

Certain biologists, limiting their attention in the main to the lower forms of life, have maintained very plausibly that males are more katabolic than females, and that maleness is the product of influences tending to produce a katabolic habit of body.[1] If this assumption is correct, maleness and femaleness are merely a repetition of the contrast existing between the animal and the plant. The katabolic animal form, through its rapid destruction of energy, has been carried developmentally away from the anabolic plant form; and of the two sexes the male has been carried farther than the female from the plant process. The body of morphological, physiological, ethnological, and demographic data which follows becomes coherent, indeed, only on the assumption that woman stands nearer to the plant process than man, representing the constructive as opposed to the disruptive metabolic tendency... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books