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The Sheep Eaters   By: (1848-)

Book cover

First Page:

[Illustration: W. A. ALLEN, AUTHOR]

THE SHEEP EATERS

BY

W. A. ALLEN, D.D.S.

[Illustration]

THE SHAKESPEARE PRESS, 114 116 EAST 28TH STREET, NEW YORK. 1913.

COPYRIGHT, 1913, by W. A. ALLEN

This Book Is Affectionately Dedicated To My Friend

MRS. CLARA DALLAS.

CONTENTS

Chapter Page

I AN EXTINCT MOUNTAIN TRIBE 7

II THE OLD SQUAW'S TALE 12

III THE GOLD SEEKER IN THE MOUNTAINS 21

IV STARTING FOR THE PAINT ROCKS 30

V A TALK WITH LITTLE BEAR 35

VI CURIOSITIES AROUND PAINT ROCK 45

VII THE STORY OF AGGRETTA AND THE RED ARROW 51

VIII CLOSING WORDS 72

THE SHEEP EATERS

CHAPTER I

AN EXTINCT MOUNTAIN TRIBE

The Sheep Eaters were a tribe of Indians that became extinct about fifty years ago, and what remaining history there is of this tribe is inscribed upon granite walls of rock in Wyoming and Montana, and in a few defiles and canyons, together with a few arrows and tepees remaining near Black Canyon, whose stream empties into the Big Horn River. Bald Mountain still holds the great shrine wheel, where the twenty eight tribes came semi annually to worship the sun, and in the most inaccessible places may still be found the remains of a happy people. Small in stature and living among the clouds, this proud race lived a happy life far removed from all other Indians.

The Shoshones seem to be a branch of the Sheep Eaters who afterwards intermarried with the Mountain Crows, a tall race of people who gave to the Shoshones a taller and better physique. From what can be gleaned, the Sheep Eater women were most beautiful, but resembled the Alaskan Indians in their shortness of stature.

These people drew their name from their principal article of food, Mountain Sheep, although, when winter set in, elk and deer were often killed when coming down before a driving snow storm.

Their home life was simple. They lived in the grassy parks of the mountains which abounded in springs of fresh water, and were surrounded by evergreens and quaking asps and sheltered by granite walls rising from fifty to a thousand feet high. Their tepees were different from those of all other tribes, and were not covered with rawhide but thatched with quaking asp bark, and covered with a gum and glue made from sheep's hoofs. Another variety were covered with pitch pine gum.

[Illustration: WHEEL OF THE HOLY SHRINE, BALD MOUNTAIN, WYO.]

In this manner lived the twenty eight tribes of Sheep Eaters, carving their history on granite walls, building their homes permanently among the snowy peaks where they held communion with the sun, and worshipping at their altar on Bald Mountain, which seems likely to remain until the Sheep Eaters are awakened by Gabriel's trumpet on the morning of the resurrection.

Never having been taught differently, they believed in gods, chief of which was the sun, and consecrated their lives to them; and their eternal happiness will be complete in the great Happy Region where all is bright and warm. The great wheel, or shrine, of this people is eighty feet across the face, and has twenty eight spokes, representing the twenty eight tribes of their race. At the center or hub there is a house of stone, where Red Eagle held the position of chief or leader of all the tribes. Facing the north east was the house of the god of plenty, and on the south east faced the house of the goddess of beauty; and due west was the beautifully built granite cave dedicated to the sun god, and from this position the services were supposed to be directed by him. Standing along the twenty eight spokes were the worshippers, chanting their songs of praise to the heavens, while their sun dial on earth was a true copy of the sun... Continue reading book >>




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