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The Short-story   By: (1783-1859)

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First Page:

[Illustration: WASHINGTON IRVING]

THE SHORT STORY

With Introduction and Notes

BY

W. PATTERSON ATKINSON, A.M.

VICE PRINCIPAL OF THE LINCOLN HIGH SCHOOL JERSEY CITY

ALLYN AND BACON

Boston New York Chicago

COPYRIGHT, 1916, BY ALLYN AND BACON.

Norwood Press J. S. Cushing Co. Berwick & Smith Co. Norwood, Mass., U.S.A.

FOREWORD

This book is the result of actual work with first year High School pupils. Furthermore, the completed text has been tried out with them. Their difficulties, standards of reading, and the average development of their minds and taste have constantly been remembered. Whatever teaching quality the book may possess is due to their criticisms.

Hearty thanks are due Messrs. G. P. Putnam's Sons, Messrs. Charles Scribner's Sons, The Thomas Y. Crowell Company, and The Houghton Mifflin Company for gracious permission to use copyrighted material.

CONTENTS

PAGE

PORTRAITS OF AUTHORS vii

INTRODUCTION

I. Definition and Development ix

II. Forms xvi

III. The Short story as Narration xvii

IV. Representative Short stories xxi

V. Bibliography xxv

WASHINGTON IRVING: Rip Van Winkle (1820) 1

EDGAR ALLAN POE: The Gold Bug (1842) 23

The Purloined Letter (1845) 69

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE: Howe's Masquerade (1838) 93

The Birthmark (1843) 112

FRANCIS BRET HARTE: The Outcasts of Poker Flat (1869) 134

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON: The Sire de Mal├ętroit's Door (1878) 148

Markheim (1885) 174

RUDYARD KIPLING: Wee Willie Winkie (1888) 196

NOTES 211

LIST OF PORTRAITS

WASHINGTON IRVING Frontispiece

FACING PAGE

EDGAR ALLAN POE 23

NATHANIEL HAWTHORNE 93

FRANCIS BRET HARTE 134

ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON 148

RUDYARD KIPLING 196

INTRODUCTION

I

DEFINITION AND DEVELOPMENT

Mankind has always loved to tell stories and to listen to them. The most primitive and unlettered peoples and tribes have always shown and still show this universal characteristic. As far back as written records go we find stories; even before that time, they were handed down from remote generations by oral tradition. The wandering minstrel followed a very ancient profession. Before him was his prototype the man with the gift of telling stories over the fire at night, perhaps at the mouth of a cave. The Greeks, who ever loved to hear some new thing, were merely typical of the ready listeners.

In the course of time the story passed through many forms and many phases the myth, e.g. The Labors of Hercules ; the legend, e.g. St. George and the Dragon ; the fairy tale, e.g. Cinderella ; the fable, e.g. The Fox and the Grapes ; the allegory, e.g. Addison's The Vision of Mirza ; the parable, e.g. The Prodigal Son . Sometimes it was merely to amuse, sometimes to instruct. With this process are intimately connected famous books, such as "The Gesta Romanorum" (which, by the way, has nothing to do with the Romans) and famous writers like Boccaccio.

Gradually there grew a body of rules and a technique, and men began to write about the way stories should be composed, as is seen in Aristotle's statement that a story should have a beginning, a middle, and an end... Continue reading book >>




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