Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Socialism and the Social Movement in the 19th Century   By:

Socialism and the Social Movement in the 19th Century by Werner Sombart

First Page:

Transcriber's Note: Inconsistent hyphenation in the original document has been preserved. Transliterated Greek text is marked like so: greek.

Socialism and the Social Movement in the 19th Century

BY WERNER SOMBART Professor in the University of Breslau

With a Chronicle of the Social Movement 1750 1896

" Je ne propose rien, je ne suppose rien; j'expose "

TRANSLATED BY ANSON P. ATTERBURY Pastor of the Park Presbyterian Church New York

WITH INTRODUCTION BY JOHN B. CLARK Professor of Political Economy Columbia University

G.P. PUTNAM'S SONS NEW YORK LONDON 27 WEST TWENTY THIRD STREET 24 BEDFORD STREET, STRAND The Knickerbocker Press 1898

COPYRIGHT, 1898 BY G.P. PUTNAM'S SONS Entered at Stationers' Hall, London

The Knickerbocker Press, New York

TO THE OTHER AND BETTER MEMBER OF THE COMMUNISTIC SOCIETY TO WHICH WE BELONG THIS TRANSLATION IS INSCRIBED

PREFACE, BY THE TRANSLATOR

While rambling through quaint old Nuremberg, last summer, I was driven for shelter from rain into a bookshop. In a conversation with the genial proprietor, he called my attention to a book, lately published, that had already made a deep impression upon the world of German readers. A reading and re reading of the little book convinced me that English readers, as well, will be glad to follow Professor Sombart in his comprehensive and suggestive review of Socialism.

Thanks are due to the learned German professor, whose name appears on the title page, for his courtesy in this matter; also to his German publisher. I would also express obligation to my friend, Professor Sigmon M. Stern, with whom I have consulted freely on some difficult points of translation. The Introduction by Professor John B. Clark, of Columbia University, will be appreciated, I know, by the reader as well as by myself.

A.P.A.

APRIL, 1898.

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

The reader of this work will miss something which he has been accustomed to find in books on Socialism. Professor Sombart has not given us synopses of the theories of St. Simon, Proudhon, Marx, Owen, and others. His work marks the coming of a period in which socialism is to be studied, rather than the speculations of socialists. Theories and plans no longer constitute the movement. There are still schools of socialistic thought; but there is something actually taking place in the industrial world that is the important part of the socialistic movement. Reality is the essence of it.

The structure of the world of industry is changing. Great establishments are exterminating small ones, and are forming federations with each other. Machinery is producing nearly every kind of goods, and there is no longer a place in the world for such a middle class as was represented by the master workman, with his slowly learned handicraft and his modest shop. These facts construed in a certain way are the material of socialism. If we see in them the dawn of an era of state industry that shall sweep competition and competitors out of the field, we are evolutionary socialists.

We may need a doctrinal basis for our view of the evolution that is going on; and we may find it in the works of Marx and others; but already we have ceased to have an absorbing interest in the contrasts and the resemblances that their several theories present. We have something to study that is more directly important than doctrinal history... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books