Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Some War-time Lessons The Soldier's Standards of Conduct; The War As a Practical Test of American Scholarship; What Have We Learned?   By: (1875-1943)

Book cover

First Page:

Note: Images of the original pages are available through Internet Archive/American Libraries. See http://www.archive.org/details/somewartimelesso00kepprich

SOME WAR TIME LESSONS

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS SALES AGENTS

NEW YORK LEMCKE & BUECHNER 30 32 EAST 20TH STREET

LONDON HUMPHREY MILFORD AMEN CORNER, E.C.

SHANGHAI EDWARD EVANS & SONS, LTD. 30 NORTH SZECHUEN ROAD

SOME WAR TIME LESSONS

The Soldier's Standards of Conduct The War As a Practical Test of American Scholarship What Have We Learned?

by

FREDERICK PAUL KEPPEL

Third Assistant Secretary of War

[Illustration]

New York Columbia University Press 1920

All rights reserved

Copyright, 1920 By Columbia University Press

Printed from type, January, 1920

Printed at The·Plimpton·Press Norwood·Mass·U·S·A

TO

NEWTON D. BAKER

CONTENTS

PAGE

I. THE AMERICAN SOLDIER AND HIS STANDARDS OF CONDUCT 9

II. THE WAR AS A PRACTICAL TEST OF AMERICAN SCHOLARSHIP 36

III. WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED? 66

SOME WAR TIME LESSONS

THE AMERICAN SOLDIER AND HIS STANDARDS OF CONDUCT[1]

Perhaps the greatest laboratory experiment in human conduct in the history of the world has been the development of our Army during the past two years. Under the provisions of the Selective Service Law, this Army has represented a cross section of American male humanity even more representative indeed than was intended; for in the efforts of the Local Boards to send men who could best be spared, many found their way into the ranks who were handicapped from the start by low mentality or disease. What were the guiding forces which operated upon this body of nearly four million men?

In the first place, our country entered the war with a great moral purpose, untinged by any trace of national or individual selfishness. We really have to go back to the Crusades to find the like. And, as then, each man supplemented this great basal impulse with whatever was to him the strongest incentive religion, patriotism, pride of family or state or regiment, the desire to excel in what all were attempting.

In the second place, thanks primarily to the vision and determination of one man, the individual appeal to each soldier as to his personal share in the great enterprise was upon the highest plane. We were fortunate in having at the head of the War Department a man peculiarly sensitive to community problems and with no small experience in their solution. Through the centuries men had come to the belief that if their soldiers were only valiant and disciplined in arms, it would not do to inquire too curiously into their personal standards of conduct in other matters that a considerable wastage in military strength from drunkenness and disease was inevitable. And as we all know, this wastage has in the past sapped, not only the strength of the Army, but afterwards the very life of the nation to which the soldier must sooner or later return.

The Secretary of War and his lieutenants, chief among whom in this field should be placed the Chairman of the Committee on Training Camp Activities, Raymond B. Fosdick, approached this problem neither in the fatalistic spirit that what has always been must continue to be, nor in a spirit of what, for want of a better term, I may call doctrinaire idealism. They faced the fact that among the hundreds of thousands of young men who were to be called to the colors, there would be many whose ears would be deaf to any abstract appeal, and many others to whom such an appeal might be made under normal conditions, but who in fatigue or the let down following the strain of conflict, could not be depended upon to stand in the hour of temptation... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books