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Systematic Status of a South American Frog, Allophryne ruthveni Gaige   By:

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In his remarkable work, Howard L. Freeman delves into the intricate world of amphibian taxonomy, unraveling the mysteries surrounding a lesser-known South American frog species called Allophryne ruthveni Gaige. Through meticulous research and detailed analysis, Freeman shines a spotlight on the systematic status of this fascinating frog, leaving no stone unturned in his pursuit of knowledge.

One of the most commendable aspects of this book is Freeman's comprehensive understanding of the subject matter. Drawing upon his vast experience in the field, he effortlessly weaves together historical accounts, anatomical examinations, genetic analyses, and ecological considerations to provide readers with a holistic view of Allophryne ruthveni. His expertise shines through, making even the most complex scientific concepts accessible to all, whether they are seasoned herpetologists or curious amateurs.

What sets Freeman's work apart is not only its scientific rigor but also its meticulous attention to detail. The author painstakingly examines every aspect of Allophryne ruthveni's taxonomy, going beyond mere description and classification. By exploring the species' phylogenetic relationships, geographic distribution, and evolutionary history, he paints a vivid picture of the frog's place within the intricate tapestry of South American biodiversity.

Freeman's engaging writing style keeps the reader captivated throughout the book. He strikes the perfect balance between scientific precision and storytelling, seamlessly blending facts and anecdotes to create an immersive reading experience. Whether discussing the peculiar behavior of Allophryne ruthveni or recounting his own field experiences, Freeman's narrative draws the reader deeper into the enchanting world of this remarkable frog.

The book is complemented by a wealth of stunning visuals, including high-quality photographs, detailed diagrams, and maps, all contributing to a more profound understanding and appreciation of Allophryne ruthveni. These visuals, combined with Freeman's clear and concise explanations, serve as invaluable tools for grasping the nuances of the frog's taxonomy and ecology.

While Systematic Status of a South American Frog, Allophryne ruthveni Gaige certainly caters to the scientific community, it also has potential appeal for nature enthusiasts, students, and anyone curious about the wonders of our planet's biodiversity. Freeman's passion for his subject matter shines through, infecting the reader with a newfound appreciation for the immense diversity and complexity of life on Earth.

In conclusion, Howard L. Freeman's book is an outstanding contribution to the field of amphibian taxonomy. Through his expertise, attention to detail, and engaging writing style, he enlightens readers on the systematic status of the South American frog Allophryne ruthveni Gaige. Freeman's work serves as both a comprehensive reference for scientists and a source of inspiration for anyone interested in exploring the fascinating world of amphibians.

First Page:

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PUBLICATIONS MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Volume 17, No. 10, pp. 493 502, 3 Figs. October 27, 1966

Systematic Status of a South American Frog, Allophryne ruthveni Gaige

BY

JOHN D. LYNCH AND HOWARD L. FREEMAN

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS LAWRENCE 1966

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PUBLICATIONS, MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

Editors: E. Raymond Hall, Chairman, Henry S. Fitch, Frank B. Cross

Volume 17, No. 10, pp. 493 502, 3 Figs. Published October 27, 1966

UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS Lawrence, Kansas

PRINTED BY ROBERT R. (BOB) SANDERS, STATE PRINTER TOPEKA, KANSAS 1966

31 5378

Systematic Status of a South American Frog, Allophryne ruthveni Gaige

BY

JOHN D. LYNCH AND HOWARD L. FREEMAN

Gaige (1926) described Allophryne ruthveni as a new genus and species of diminutive bufonid from British Guiana. Noble (1931) considered A. ruthveni to be a toothless relative of Centrolenella and placed the genus in the Hylidae. Gallardo (1965) suggested that Allophryne is a leptodactylid of uncertain affinities. Other references to the monotypic genus have consisted only of a listing of the name or of its inclusion in a key. To date the holotype and one paratype (both females) have been reported (Gaige, 1926), and the family position of the genus remains unsettled... Continue reading book >>




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