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Tiny Luttrell   By: (1866-1921)

Tiny Luttrell by Ernest William Hornung

First Page:

TINY LUTTRELL

BY ERNEST WILLIAM HORNUNG

AUTHOR OF "A BRIDE FROM THE BUSH," "UNDER TWO SKIES"

NEW YORK CASSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY 104 & 106 FOURTH AVENUE

COPYRIGHT, 1893, BY CASSELL PUBLISHING COMPANY.

All rights reserved.

THE MERSHON COMPANY PRESS, RAHWAY, N. J.

TO C. A. M. D. FROM E. W. H.

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER PAGE I. THE COMING OF TINY, 1 II. SWIFT OF WALLANDOON, 21 III. THE TAIL OF THE SEASON, 44 IV. RUTH AND CHRISTINA, 63 V. ESSINGHAM RECTORY, 84 VI. A MATTER OF ANCIENT HISTORY, 102 VII. THE SHADOW OF THE HALL, 116 VIII. COUNTESS DROMARD AT HOME, 133 IX. MOTHER AND SON, 148 X. A THREATENING DAWN, 162 XI. IN THE LADIES' TENT, 176 XII. ORDEAL BY BATTLE, 193 XIII. HER HOUR OF TRIUMPH, 213 XIV. A CYCLE OF MOODS, 233 XV. THE INVISIBLE IDEAL, 248 XVI. FOREIGN SOIL, 263 XVII. THE HIGH SEAS, 286 XVIII. THE THIRD TIME OF ASKING, 306 XIX. COUNSEL'S OPINION, 317 XX. IN HONOR BOUND, 327 XXI. A DEAF EAR, 339 XXII. SUMMUM BONUM, 348

TINY LUTTRELL.

CHAPTER I.

THE COMING OF TINY.

Swift of Wallandoon was visibly distraught. He had driven over to the township in the heat of the afternoon to meet the coach. The coach was just in sight, which meant that it could not arrive for at least half an hour. Yet nothing would induce Swift to wait quietly in the hotel veranda; he paid no sort of attention to the publican who pressed him to do so. The iron roofs of the little township crackled in the sun with a sound as of distant musketry; their sharp edged shadows lay on the sand like sheets of zinc that might be lifted up in one piece; and a hot wind in full blast played steadily upon Swift's neck and ears. He had pulled up in the shade, and was leaning forward, with his wide awake tilted over his nose, and his eyes on a cloud of dust between the bellying sand hills and the dark blue sky. The cloud advanced, revealing from time to time a growing speck. That speck was the coach which Swift had come to meet.

He was a young man with broad shoulders and good arms, and a general air of smartness and alacrity about which there could be no mistake. He had dark hair and a fair mustache; his eye was brown and alert; and much wind and sun had reddened a face that commonly gave the impression of complete capability with a sufficiency of force. This afternoon, however, Swift lacked the confident look of the thoroughly capable young man. And he was even younger than he looked; he was young enough to fancy that the owner of Wallandoon, who was a passenger by the approaching coach, had traveled five hundred miles expressly to deprive John Swift of the fine position to which recent good luck had promoted him.

He could think of nothing else to bring Mr. Luttrell all the way from Melbourne at the time of year when a sheep station causes least anxiety. The month was April, there had been a fair rainfall since Christmas, and only in his last letter Mr. Luttrell had told Swift that all he need do for the present was to take care of the fences and let the sheep take care of themselves. The next news was a telegram to the effect that Mr. Luttrell was coming up country to see for himself how things were going at Wallandoon. Having stepped into the managership by an accident, and even so merely as a trial man, young Swift at once made sure that his trial was at an end. It did not strike him that in spite of his youth he was the ideal person for the post... Continue reading book >>




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