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To Win the Love He Sought   By: (1866-1946)

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TO WIN THE LOVE HE SOUGHT

The Great Awakening

by

E. PHILLIPS OPPENHEIM

Author of "The Mischief Maker" "Berenice" "Havoc" "The Lost Leader" "The Malefactor"

VOLUME THREE

P F Collier & Son Company Publishers New York

Copyright 1910 By C. H. Doscher & C

Copyright 1912 By P. F. Collier & Son

[Illustration: ADRIENNE CARTUCCIO]

CONTENTS

I. THE MEETING

II. "SHE IS A SINGER"

III. "BETTER THOU WERT DEAD BEFORE ME"

IV. "DOWN INTO HELL TO WIN THE LOVE HE SOUGHT"

V. TREACHERY

VI. "THE BITTER SPRINGS OF ANGER AND FEAR"

VII. COMFORT! COMFORT SCORNED OF DEVILS

VIII. "DEATH IN THE FACE, AND MURDER IN THE HEART"

IX. 'AH! WHY SHOULD LOVE,' ETC.

X. A MARIONI'S OATH

XI. A MEETING OF THE ORDER

XII. "A FIGURE FROM A WORLD GONE BY"

XIII. BETWEEN LIFE AND DEATH

XIV. AN EVERLASTING HATE

XV. THE COUNT'S SECOND VISITOR

XVI. A NEW MEMBER FOR THE ORDER

XVII. THE RETURN TO REASON

XVIII. "I HAVE A FEAR A FOOLISH FEAR"

XIX. THE NEW GOVERNESS

XX. LORD LUMLEY AND MARGHARITA

XXI. A LAND THAT IS LONELIER THAN RUIN

XXII. LORD LUMLEY'S CONFESSION

XXIII. MARGHARITA'S DIARY A CORRESPONDENCE

XXIV. "WHITE HYACINTHS"

XXV. AMONG THE PINE TREES

XXVI. STORMS

XXVII. A LIFE IN THE BALANCE

XXVIII. ONE DAY'S RESPITE

XXIX. THERE IS DEATH BEFORE US

XXX. THE DAWN OF A NEW LIFE

XXXI. AN OLD MAN'S HATE

XXXII. THE KEEPING OF THE OATH

TO WIN THE LOVE HE SOUGHT

CHAPTER I

THE MEETING

The soft mantle of a southern twilight had fallen upon land and sea, and the heart of the Palermitans was glad. Out they trooped into the scented darkness, strolling along the promenade in little groups, listening to the band, drinking in the cool night breeze from the sea, singling out friends, laughing, talking, flirting, and passing on. A long line of carriages was drawn up along the Marina, and many of the old Sicilian aristocracy were mingling with the crowd.

Palermo is like a night blossom which opens only with the first breath of evening. By day, it is parched and sleepy and stupid; by night, it is alive and joyous the place itself becomes an al fresco paradise. It is night which draws the sweetness from the flowers. The air is heavy with the faint perfume of hyacinths and wild violets, and a breeze stirring among the orange groves wafts a delicious aromatic odor across the bay. Long rays of light from the little semi circle of white fronted villas flash across the slumbering waters of the harbor. Out of door restaurants are crowded; all is light and life and bustle; every one is glad to have seen the last of the broiling sun; every one is happy and light hearted. The inborn gaiety of the south asserts itself. Women in graceful toilettes pass backward and forward along the broad parade, making the air sweeter still with the perfume of their floating draperies, and the light revelry of their musical laughter.

'Tis a motley throng, and there is no respecting of persons. Townspeople, a sprinkling of the old nobility, and a few curious visitors follow in each other's footsteps. By day, those who can, sleep; by night, they awake and don their daintiest clothing, and Palermo is gay.

The terrace of the Hotel de l'Europe extends to the very verge of the promenade, and, night by night, is crowded with men of all conditions and nations, who sit before little marble tables facing the sea, smoking and drinking coffee and liqueurs. At one of these, so close to the promenade that the dresses of the passers by almost touched them, two men were seated.

One was of an order and race easily to be distinguished in any quarter of the globe an English country gentleman. There was no possibility of any mistake about him... Continue reading book >>




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