Books Should Be Free
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Travels in China, Containing Descriptions, Observations, and Comparisons, Made and Collected in the Course of a Short Residence at the Imperial Palace of Yuen-Min-Yuen, and on a Subsequent Journey through the Country from Pekin to Canton   By: (1764-1848)

Book cover

In "Travels in China," John Barrow takes us on an extraordinary journey through the heart of China, offering a comprehensive and insightful account of his experiences. This travelogue not only showcases his astute observations but also provides valuable historical and cultural context, making it an incredibly informative and engaging read.

Barrow's narrative begins with his short stay at the magnificent Imperial Palace of Yuen-Min-Yuen, where he had the unique opportunity to witness and partake in the daily life of the imperial court. His vivid descriptions transport the reader to this opulent world, allowing us to fully appreciate its grandeur and intricacies. From the meticulously designed gardens to the elaborate rituals and ceremonies, Barrow's account offers a glimpse into a world few have had the privilege to witness.

Moving beyond the confines of the palace, Barrow embarks on a journey that takes him from Pekin to Canton, offering a firsthand account of the diverse landscapes, cities, and people he encounters along the way. He effortlessly weaves in historical anecdotes, political insights, and cultural nuances, painting a comprehensive picture of the various regions he traverses. His keen eye for detail and his ability to capture the essence of each place make these descriptions come alive, evoking a strong sense of place and atmosphere.

What sets "Travels in China" apart is Barrow's approach to his subject matter. Rather than simply presenting his own observations, he frequently draws comparisons between Chinese culture and Western customs, highlighting the similarities and differences. This comparative approach adds depth and richness to his narrative, allowing for a nuanced understanding of China's intricate societal fabric.

Throughout the book, Barrow maintains an objective tone, avoiding overt criticism or praise. Instead, he allows his experiences to speak for themselves, leaving readers to form their own opinions. This approach not only fosters a sense of authenticity but also presents a fair and balanced portrayal of Chinese society.

The only downside to "Travels in China" is its occasional density. Barrow's meticulous attention to detail, while commendable, can sometimes bog down the narrative, making it a bit challenging to navigate. Nonetheless, for those seeking a comprehensive and enlightening account of China in the early 19th century, this book is an invaluable resource.

In conclusion, John Barrow's "Travels in China" is a captivating narrative that offers an intimate and insightful glimpse into a fascinating country. With its meticulous observations, historical context, and comparative approach, this travelogue is a must-read for anyone interested in exploring the complexities of Chinese culture and society. Whether you are a history buff or simply an armchair traveler, this book will transport you to a world of wonder, making it a highly recommended addition to your reading list.

First Page:

[Transcriber's Note:

English transliterations for the Greek and Chinese words have been provided. Transliterations have not been provided when a Chinese character is followed by a transliteration in the book.

A few other substitutions have also been used in this version of the text. They are as follows:

[= ] surrounding a vowel indicates that it is a long vowel with a macron (dash) above it.

[v ] surrounding a vowel indicates that vowel has a circumflex above it.

A good number of printer's errors have been corrected, including all those in the Errata. All other spelling and grammar inconsistencies have been retained.

As a final note, the I section of the index contains both I and J entries.]

[Illustration: Hickey del^t T. Medland sculp^t

Portrait of Van ta gin

Pub. May 2, 1804, by Mess^rs. Cadell, & Davies, Strand, London. ]

TRAVELS

IN

CHINA ,

CONTAINING

DESCRIPTIONS, OBSERVATIONS, AND COMPARISONS, MADE AND COLLECTED IN THE COURSE OF A SHORT RESIDENCE AT THE IMPERIAL PALACE OF YUEN MIN YUEN, AND ON A SUBSEQUENT JOURNEY THROUGH THE COUNTRY FROM

PEKIN TO CANTON.

IN WHICH IT IS ATTEMPTED TO APPRECIATE THE RANK THAT THIS EXTRAORDINARY EMPIRE MAY BE CONSIDERED TO HOLD IN THE SCALE OF CIVILIZED NATIONS.

"NON CUIVIS HOMINI CONTINGIT ADIRE CORINTHUM ... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books