Books Should Be Free is now
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

The Trojan Women of Euripides   By: (480? BC - 406 BC)

Book cover

First Page:

THE TROJAN WOMEN

THE ATHENIAN DRAMA FOR ENGLISH READERS

A Series of Verse Translations of the Greek Dramatic Poets, with Commentaries and Explanatory Notes.

=Crown 8vo, cloth, gilt top, 7s. 6d. each net. Each Volume Illustrated from ancient Sculptures and Vase Painting.=

AESCHYLUS: The Orestean Trilogy. By Prof. G. C. WARR. With an Introduction on The Rise of Greek Tragedy , and 13 Illustrations.

SOPHOCLES: Oedipus Tyrannus and Coloneus , and Antigone . By Prof. J. S. PHILLIMORE. With an Introduction on Sophocles and his Treatment of Tragedy , and 16 Illustrations.

EURIPIDES: Hippolytus ; Bacchae ; Aristophanes' 'Frogs.' By Prof. GILBERT MURRAY. With an Appendix on The Lost Tragedies of Euripides , and an Introduction on The Significance of the Bacchae in Athenian History , and 12 Illustrations. [ Second Edition.

ALSO UNIFORM WITH THE ABOVE

THE HOMERIC HYMNS. A New Prose Rendering by ANDREW LANG, with Essays Critical and Explanatory, and 14 Illustrations.

THE PLAYS OF EURIPIDES

Translated into English Rhyming Verse, with Explanatory Notes, by Prof. GILBERT MURRAY. Crown 8vo, cloth, 2s. each net.

The Trojan Women. Electra. [ In the Press.

Hippolytus. Third Edition. } Paper Covers, Impl. Bacchae. } 16mo, 1s. each net.

THE

TROJAN WOMEN

OF

EURIPIDES

TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH RHYMING VERSE WITH EXPLANATORY NOTES BY

GILBERT MURRAY, M.A., LL.D.

EMERITUS PROFESSOR OF GREEK IN THE UNIVERSITY OF GLASGOW; SOMETIME FELLOW OF NEW COLLEGE, OXFORD

LONDON GEORGE ALLEN, 156, CHARING CROSS ROAD 1905

[All rights reserved]

Printed by BALLANTYNE HANSON & CO. At the Ballantyne Press

INTRODUCTORY NOTE

Judged by common standards, the Tro├Ądes is far from a perfect play; it is scarcely even a good play. It is an intense study of one great situation, with little plot, little construction, little or no relief or variety. The only movement of the drama is a gradual extinguishing of all the familiar lights of human life, with, perhaps, at the end, a suggestion that in the utterness of night, when all fears of a possible worse thing are passed, there is in some sense peace and even glory. But the situation itself has at least this dramatic value, that it is different from what it seems.

The consummation of a great conquest, a thing celebrated in paeans and thanksgivings, the very height of the day dreams of unregenerate man it seems to be a great joy, and it is in truth a great misery. It is conquest seen when the thrill of battle is over, and nothing remains but to wait and think. We feel in the background the presence of the conquerors, sinister and disappointed phantoms; of the conquered men, after long torment, now resting in death. But the living drama for Euripides lay in the conquered women. It is from them that he has named his play and built up his scheme of parts: four figures clearly lit and heroic, the others in varying grades of characterisation, nameless and barely articulate, mere half heard voices of an eternal sorrow.

Indeed, the most usual condemnation of the play is not that it is dull, but that it is too harrowing; that scene after scene passes beyond the due limits of tragic art... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books