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The True-Born Englishman A Satire   By: (1661?-1731)

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[Transcriber's Note: This satire in verse by Daniel Defoe (c. 1659 1731) was first published in 1701 under the title, The True Born Englishman. A Satyr , and went through numerous editions in Defoe's lifetime. This e book was prepared from The Novels and Miscellaneous Works of Daniel De Foe , Volume 5 (London: Henry G. Bohn, 1855), in which the spelling, punctuation, and capitalization have apparently been modernized. Obvious printer errors have been corrected. A table of contents has been added for the reader's convenience.]

THE

TRUE BORN ENGLISHMAN:

A

SATIRE.

Statuimus pacem, et securitatem et concordiam judicum et justiciam inter Anglos et Normannos, Francos et Britanes, Walliæ, et Cornubiæ, Pictos et Scotos, Albaniæ, similiter inter Francos et insulanos provincias et patrias, quæ pertinent ad coronam nostram, et inter omnes nobis subjectos firmiter et inviolabiliter observare.

Charta Regis Gullielmi Conquisitoris de Pacis Publica, cap. i.

CONTENTS

AN EXPLANATORY PREFACE.

PREFACE.

THE INTRODUCTION.

THE TRUE BORN ENGLISHMAN.

PART I.

PART II.

BRITANNIA.

HIS FINE SPEECH, &c.

THE CONCLUSION.

AN

EXPLANATORY PREFACE.

It is not that I see any reason to alter my opinion in any thing I have writ, which occasions this epistle; but I find it necessary for the satisfaction of some persons of honour, as well as wit, to pass a short explication upon it; and tell the world what I mean, or rather, what I do not mean, in some things wherein I find I am liable to be misunderstood.

I confess myself something surpris'd to hear that I am taxed with bewraying my own nest, and abusing our nation, by discovering the meanness of our original, in order to make the English contemptible abroad and at home; in which, I think, they are mistaken: for why should not our neighbours be as good as we to derive from? And I must add, that had we been an unmix'd nation, I am of opinion it had been to our disadvantage: for to go no farther, we have three nations about us as clear from mixtures of blood as any in the world, and I know not which of them I could wish ourselves to be like; I mean the Scots, the Welsh, and the Irish; and if I were to write a reverse to the Satire, I would examine all the nations of Europe, and prove, that those nations which are most mix'd, are the best, and have least of barbarism and brutality among them; and abundance of reasons might be given for it, too long to bring into a Preface.

But I give this hint, to let the world know, that I am far from thinking, 'tis a Satire upon the English nation, to tell them, they are derived from all the nations under heaven; that is, from several nations. Nor is it meant to undervalue the original of the English, for we see no reason to like them worse, being the relicts of Romans, Danes, Saxons and Normans, than we should have done if they had remain'd Britons, that is, than if they had been all Welshmen.

But the intent of the Satire is pointed at the vanity of those who talk of their antiquity, and value themselves upon their pedigree, their ancient families, and being true born; whereas 'tis impossible we should be true born: and if we could, should have lost by the bargain.

These sort of people, who call themselves true born, and tell long stories of their families, and like a nobleman of Venice, think a foreigner ought not to walk on the same side of the street with them, are own'd to be meant in this Satire. What they would infer from their long original, I know not, nor is it easy to make out whether they are the better or the worse for their ancestors: our English nation may value themselves for their wit, wealth and courage, and I believe few nations will dispute it with them; but for long originals, and ancient true born families of English, I would advise them to wave the discourse. A true Englishman is one that deserves a character, and I have nowhere lessened him, that I know of; but as for a true born Englishman, I confess I do not understand him... Continue reading book >>




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