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Ulysses S. Grant   By: (1840-1907)

Book cover

First Page:

The Riverside Biographical Series

NUMBER 7

ULYSSES S. GRANT

BY

WALTER ALLEN

The Riverside Biographical Series

ANDREW JACKSON, by W. G. BROWN JAMES B. EADS, by LOUIS HOW BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, by PAUL E. MORE PETER COOPER, by R. W. RAYMOND THOMAS JEFFERSON, by H. C. MERWIN WILLIAM PENN, by GEORGE HODGES GENERAL GRANT, by WALTER ALLEN. MERIWETHER LEWIS AND WILLIAM CLARK, by WILLIAM R. LIGHTON. JOHN MARSHALL, by JAMES B. THAYER.

Each about 100 pages, 16mo, with photogravure portrait, 75 cents; School Edition , 50 cents, net

HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN & CO.

BOSTON AND NEW YORK

[Illustration: U. S. Grant]

ULYSSES S. GRANT

BY

WALTER ALLEN

[Illustration: Publisher's logo]

BOSTON AND NEW YORK

HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN AND COMPANY

The Riverside Press, Cambridge

1901

COPYRIGHT, 1901, BY WALTER ALLEN

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

CONTENTS

CHAP. PAGE

I. OUR NATIONAL MILITARY HERO 1

II. HIS ANCESTRY 5

III. THE PERIOD OF YOUTH 11

IV. HIS LIFEWORK APPOINTED 18

V. LOVE AND WAR 26

VI. YEARS OF DORMANT POWER 34

VII. THE SUMMONS OF PATRIOTISM 42

VIII. FROM SPRINGFIELD TO FORT DONELSON 46

IX. SHILOH, CORINTH, IUKA 57

X. VICKSBURG 65

XI. NEW RESPONSIBILITIES CHATTANOOGA 77

XII. LIEUTENANT GENERAL, COMMANDER OF ALL THE ARMIES 85

XIII. THE WILDERNESS AND SPOTTSYLVANIA 95

XIV. FROM SPOTTSYLVANIA TO RICHMOND 104

XV. IN WASHINGTON AMONG POLITICIANS 114

XVI. HIS FIRST ADMINISTRATION 123

XVII. HIS SECOND ADMINISTRATION 133

XVIII. THE TOUR OF THE WORLD 144

XIX. REVERSES OF FORTUNE ILL HEALTH HIS LAST VICTORY THE END 149

ULYSSES SIMPSON GRANT

CHAPTER I

OUR NATIONAL MILITARY HERO

Since the end of the civil war in the United States, whoever has occasion to name the three most distinguished representatives of our national greatness is apt to name Washington, Lincoln, and Grant. General Grant is now our national military hero. Of Washington it has often been said that he was "first in war, first in peace, and first in the hearts of his countrymen." When this eulogy was wholly just the nation had been engaged in no war on a grander scale than the war for independence. That war, in the numbers engaged, in the multitude and renown of its battles, in the territory over which its campaigns were extended, in its destruction of life and waste of property, in the magnitude of the interests at stake (but not in the vital importance of the issue), was far inferior to the civil war. It happens quite naturally, as in so many other affairs in this world, that the comparative physical magnitude of the conflicts has much influence in moulding the popular estimate of the rank of the victorious commanders.

Those who think that in our civil war there were other officers in both armies who were Grant's superiors in some points of generalship will hardly dispute that, taking all in all, he was supreme among the generals on the side of the Union. He whom Sherman, Sheridan, Thomas, and Meade saw promoted to be their commander, not only without envy, but with high gratification, under whom they all served with cordial confidence and enthusiasm, cannot have been esteemed by them unfit for the distinction... Continue reading book >>




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