Books Should Be Free
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

We Three   By: (1876-1953)

Book cover

We Three is a captivating historical novel written by Gouverneur Morris. Set in post-Revolutionary War New York City, this book transports readers back to a time filled with political intrigue, social fervor, and personal struggles.

The story revolves around three main characters whose lives intertwine amidst the backdrop of a burgeoning nation. The author does a masterful job of fleshing out these characters, making them relatable as they navigate the challenges and triumphs of their time.

One protagonist, a young ambitious lawyer seeking justice, embodies the old saying, "The pen is mightier than the sword." His intellectual prowess, coupled with a moral compass, propels the narrative forward, drawing readers into the mysteries and scandals that plague the city's elite.

Another character, a fierce and determined woman challenging societal norms, represents the fight against oppression and inequality. Her independent spirit and unwavering determination make her a force to be reckoned with and a source of inspiration.

Finally, the third character, a secretive individual with a mysterious past, adds an element of suspense and intrigue to the narrative. This enigmatic figure's hidden motivations and actions keep readers guessing, adding another layer of complexity to an already rich story.

Morris's writing style is elegant and fluid, effortlessly transporting readers to the gritty streets of 18th-century New York City. The meticulous attention to historical detail is evident throughout, immersing readers in the sights, sounds, and smells of the time. From the opulent ballrooms of the upper crust to the dimly lit back alleys filled with whispered secrets, the author paints a vivid picture of the era.

Furthermore, the pacing of the novel is well-crafted, with moments of intense action interspersed with quieter introspective scenes. This balance keeps the reader engaged and invested in the characters' journeys, eagerly turning the pages to uncover the truth and witness their personal growth.

One of the standout features of We Three is the author's ability to intertwine historical events seamlessly into the narrative. From the political conflicts between federalists and anti-federalists to the aftermath of the Revolutionary War, Morris uses these events as a backdrop to explore deeper themes of loyalty, love, and the pursuit of justice.

However, there are moments when the plot feels slightly predictable, and certain twists and turns lack the element of surprise. Additionally, the ending may leave some readers yearning for a more definitive resolution to certain storylines.

In conclusion, We Three is a captivating historical novel that seamlessly weaves together politics, romance, and personal struggles. Gouverneur Morris's impeccable attention to historical detail and well-developed characters make this a must-read for fans of the genre. Despite a few predictable moments, the overall narrative is engaging and keeps readers eagerly turning the pages.

First Page:

[Frontispiece: "Dark against the light illumination of the hall stood Lucy Fulton."]

WE THREE

BY

GOUVERNEUR MORRIS

AUTHOR OF THE SEVEN DARLINGS, ETC

ILLUSTRATED BY

HENRY HUTT

GROSSET & DUNLAP

PUBLISHERS

NEW YORK

COPYRIGHT, 1916, BY

D. APPLETON AND COMPANY

COPYRIGHT, 1913, 1916, BY THE INTERNATIONAL MAGAZINE COMPANY

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

"Dark against the light illumination of the hall stood Lucy Fulton" . . . . . . Frontispiece

"They met with an honest kiss, like lovers long parted"

"It's what you and I stood up and promised before a lot of people"

"'You are all that counts . . . you know that'"

WE THREE

I

When I know that Lucy is going to Palm Beach for the winter I shall go to Aiken. When I know that she is going to Aiken, I shall go to Palm Beach. And I shall play the same game with Bar Harbor, Newport, Europe, and other summer resorts. So we shall only meet by accident, and hardly ever. We've been asked not to.

But I ought to begin further back. It would do no harm to begin at the beginning. There is even a king's advice to that effect. Said the king in "Alice," "Begin at the Beginning, go on to the End, and then stop."

In the beginning, then: When I was a little boy, old enough to be warned against playing with matches, I began of course to think them desirable playthings, and whenever I got a chance played with them... Continue reading book >>




eBook Downloads
ePUB eBook
• iBooks for iPhone and iPad
• Nook
• Sony Reader
Kindle eBook
• Mobi file format for Kindle
Read eBook
• Load eBook in browser
Text File eBook
• Computers
• Windows
• Mac

Review this book



Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books