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Winning His Way   By: (1823-1896)

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Note: Images of the original pages are available through Internet Archive/American Libraries. See http://www.archive.org/details/winninghisway00coffrich

WINNING HIS WAY.

by

CHARLES CARLETON COFFIN,

Author "Story of Liberty," "Boys of '76," "My Days and Nights on the Battlefield," "Our New Way Round the World," "Following the Flag," Etc.

Boston, Mass.: Perry Mason & Co. 1888.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1865, by Charles Carleton Coffin, In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts

CONTENTS.

CHAPTER PAGE

I. FIRST YEARS 1

II. HARD TIMES 27

III. MERRY TIMES 42

IV. MUSIC AND PAINTING 63

V. THE NIGHT HAWKS 82

VI. PAUL'S FRIENDS 91

VII. IN A TRAP 103

VIII. KEEPING SCHOOL 116

IX. RALLYING ROUND THE FLAG 126

X. A SOLDIER 144

XI. SCOUTING 156

XII. MISSED FROM HOME 170

XIII. THE MARCH 175

XIV. THE BATTLE 180

XV. SHOWING WHAT HE WAS MADE OF 190

XVI. HONOR TO THE BRAVE 200

XVII. CHICKAMAUGA 207

XVIII. HOW HE LIVED IN THE MEMORY OF HIS FRIENDS 211

XIX. WHAT BECAME OF A TRAITOR 217

XX. DARK DAYS 224

XXI. CONSECRATION 233

XXII. UNDER THE OLD FLAG 241

XXIII. THE JAWS OF DEATH 248

XXIV. HOME 253

WINNING HIS WAY.

CHAPTER I.

FIRST YEARS.

Many years ago, before railroads were thought of, a company of Connecticut farmers, who had heard marvellous stories of the richness of the land in the West, sold their farms, packed up their goods, bade adieu to their friends, and with their families started for Ohio.

After weeks of travel over dusty roads, they came to a beautiful valley, watered by a winding river. The hills around were fair and sunny. There were groves of oaks, and maples, and lindens. The air was fragrant with honeysuckle and jasmine. There was plenty of game. The swift footed deer browsed the tender grass upon the hills. Squirrels chattered in the trees and the ringdoves cooed in the depths of the forest. The place was so fertile and fair, so pleasant and peaceful, that the emigrants made it their home, and called it New Hope.

They built a mill upon the river. They laid out a wide, level street, and a public square, erected a school house, and then a church. One of their number opened a store. Other settlers came, and, as the years passed by, the village rang with the shouts of children pouring from the school house for a frolic upon the square. Glorious times they had beneath the oaks and maples.

One of the jolliest of the boys was Paul Parker, only son of Widow Parker, who lived in a little old house, shaded by a great maple, on the outskirts of the village. Her husband died when Paul was in his cradle. Paul's grandfather was still living. The people called him "Old Pensioner Parker," for he fought at Bunker Hill, and received a pension from government. He was hale and hearty, though more than eighty years of age.

The pension was the main support of the family. They kept a cow, a pig, turkeys, and chickens, and, by selling milk and eggs, which Paul carried to their customers, they brought the years round without running in debt... Continue reading book >>




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