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By: Frank Gee Patchin

The Pony Rider Boys in the Rockies by Frank Gee Patchin The Pony Rider Boys in the Rockies

The Pony Rider Boys in the Rockies is the first book in the 12 part series by Frank Gee Patchin.

Book cover The Pony Rider Boys in Texas

Yee-hawww! The Pony Rider Boys are on the trail again! In the second book of this series, Professor Zepplin has taken the young men to San Diego, Texas, to experience the life of a cowboy. The cattle drive will take them across the great state of Texas, where they will meet many dangers and adventures.

Book cover The Pony Rider Boys in Montana

Yee-Haaw! The Pony Rider Boys are on the move again! In this book, the 3rd of the series, the boys have decided that they want to explore the north country. They also want to make their own arrangements for the adventure, with the approval of Professor Zepplin, of course! So they have arrived in Forsythe, Montana, to try their luck in the mountains.

Book cover Pony Rider Boys in New Mexico

Yee-Haw!! The Pony Rider Boys are on the move again! This time they are on their way to Bluewater, New Mexico, ready for whatever adventure they can find. But this time, trouble spots them on the train. Will the Pony Rider Boys be able to handle whatever comes their way?

Book cover Pony Rider Boys in Alaska

Yee-haw!! The Pony Riders Boys are on the move again! In their last adventure, they are on their way with Professor Zepplin to Alaska. On the "Corsair", they see gold miners on their way to seek their fortune, so the Pony Rider Boys decide to join in the hunt for the yellow metal. But, as always, trouble is not far behind the Pony Rider Boys! (Ann Boulais )

Book cover Pony Rider Boys with the Texas Rangers

Yee-Haw!! The Pony Rider Boys are on the move again. This time the boys at Delaware Creek, dead in their saddles. They had been riding long and hard into Texas, looking forward to their next adventure. But, trouble finds them once again, this time Stacy Brown may have been shot! What will happen next is anyone's guess. Previous book in the series: The Pony Rider Boys in Grand Canyon Next book in the series: The Pony Rider Boys on the Blue Ridge

Pony Rider Boys in the Alkali by Frank Gee Patchin Pony Rider Boys in the Alkali

Yee-Haww! The Pony Rider Boys are on the move again! This time the boys are in the desert of Nevada, discovering the beauty and perils in 100 degree heat. It should be another thrilling ride that Professor Zepplin has taken them on!

Book cover Pony Rider Boys in the Grand Canyon

Yee-Haaww! The Pony Rider Boys are on the move again. The boys are back home, but as they are chopping wood, it is decided that they need a new adventure out west. Mr. Perkin's, Walter's dad, has suggested the Grand Canyon. So, meeting Professor Zepplin on the way, they set out on the train for Arizona. Previous book in the series: The Pony Rider Boys in New Mexico Next book in the series: The Pony Rider Boys with the Texas Rangers

Book cover Pony Rider Boys in the Ozarks

Yee-Haw!! The Pony Rider Boys are on the move again! This time the boys are in the Ozark Mountains in Missouri. With Joe Hawk, or Eagle-eye, guiding them, Professor Zepplin and the Pony Rider Boys are sure to find many adventures in this action-packed, fourth book of this series by Frank Gee Patchin.

Book cover Pony Rider Boys in New England

Yee-Haw! The Pony Rider Boys are on the trail again! This time the boys are doing something a little different. Instead of heading west to the wide open spaces, they are riding east to the Wilderness of Maine. But, as always, trouble finds the boys, in both the four-legged and two-legged form! Will they make it back out of the wilderness?

Book cover Pony Rider Boys on the Blue Ridge

Yee-Haw! The Pony Rider Boys are on the move again. This time our friends are in the Carolina Mountains, battling the weather and bullies. But Tad proves how valuable and resourceful he truly is! Previous book in the series: The Pony Rider Boys with the Texas Rangers Next book in the series: The Pony Rider Boys in New England

Book cover Pony Rider Boys in Louisiana

Yee-haw! The Pony Rider Boys are on the move again! This time the boys are headed to the canebrakes in the swamps of Louisiana. Of course trouble follows our friends into the swamp, but Chunky will surprise everyone in this book. Previous book in the series: The Pony Rider Boys in New England Next book in the series: The Pony Rider Boys in Alaska

By: Frank L. Packard (1877-1942)

The White Moll by Frank L. Packard The White Moll

Frank Lucius Packard (February 2, 1877 – February 17, 1942) born in Montreal, Quebec, was a Canadian novelist. Packard is credited with bridging the gap from the “cozy” style mysteries to the more gritty, hard-boiled style of such writers as Dashiell Hammet and Raymond Chandler. Packard also wrote a series of novels, beginning in 1917, featuring Jimmie Dale. A wealthy playboy by day, at night, Jimmie becomes a crimefighter “The Gray Seal” complete with mask and secret hide-out, “The Sanctuary”...

By: Frank Pinkerton

Dyke Darrel the Railroad Detective by Frank Pinkerton Dyke Darrel the Railroad Detective

Dyke Darrel investigates an audacious train robbery that included the murder of a friend, and embarks on a man-hunt. High Victorian serial melodrama at its best!

Won by Crime by Frank Pinkerton Won by Crime

Originally included with the published edition of Dyke Darell, this is an unrelated novella. Portuguese Viceroy to Goa, Don Garcia brought his daughter and nephew to the wild island. Adventure and melodrama ensue!

By: Frank V. Webster

Bob the Castaway by Frank V. Webster Bob the Castaway

Frank V Webster was a pseudonym controlled by the Stratemeyer Syndicate, the first book packager of books aimed at children. This pseudonym was used on books for boys from the early 1900s through the 1930s.Bob the Castaway follows the antics of young prankster Bob Henderson, his parents futile attempts to get him to mend his ways, and his subsequent nautical adventures. (Introduction by Nigel Boydell)

By: Frederick Marryat (1792-1848)

Mr. Midshipman Easy by Frederick Marryat Mr. Midshipman Easy

One of the first novel-length pieces of nautical fiction, MR. MIDSHIPMAN EASY (1836) is a funny and easygoing account of the adventures of Jack Easy, a son of privilege who joins the Royal Navy. The work begins as a satire on Jack’s attachment to “the rights of man” that may try the listener’s patience. But despair not, for the story soon settles down as the philosophical midshipman begins his many triumphs over bullies, foul weather, and various damned foreigners of murderous intent.Caveat audiens: This novel employs racial/ethnic epithets and religious stereotypes, as well as taking a rather sunny view of supply-side economics...

Book cover Snarleyyow

This is a quite amusing nautical tale of the British Navy of the around the year 1700. While, as with much early 'humor', it is somewhat heavy-handed, the sympathies of the author are clear and good, and cruelty is often averted by good fortune or background characters. First published under the title 'The Dog Fiend', the primary characters are an evil captain of a cutter and his dog. The dog seems indestructible, as is the poor cabin boy who is the butt of the captain's ill humor, and who often is chewed on by the dog...

By: Frederick O. Bartlett (1876-1945)

The Web of the Golden Spider by Frederick O. Bartlett The Web of the Golden Spider

The Web of the Golden Spider is a tale of mystery, intrigue and adventure that begins in the city, progresses to a mutinous open sea voyage, eventually leading to the remotest areas on the slopes of the Andes of South America. Wilson, our hero, finds himself in the midst of a battle between a deposed queen and revolutionists who have banded together in an effort to bring their country together as a republic. Wilson, although torn between helping mercenaries, freedom fighters and revolutionaries, is more concerned with the rescuing of the girl he has fallen in love with, but who has been snatched from him by a mysterious priest...

By: Fridtjof Nansen (1861-1930)

Farthest North by Fridtjof Nansen Farthest North

Being the Record of a Voyage of Exploration of the Ship "Fram", 1893-96 and of a Fifteen Months' Sleigh Journey by Dr. Nansen and Lieut. Johansen / by Fridtjof Nansen; with an Appendix by Otto Sverdrup

By: G. K. Chesterton (1874-1936)

The Man Who was Thursday by G. K. Chesterton The Man Who was Thursday

Two poets in a London park at sunset, debating on the attributes of poetry and whether it's really a metaphor for anarchy. A group that meets in secret, planning to overthrow the world order. Disguises and deceptions, ideals and ideology. A medley of themes and genres makes this a great read for anyone who's a fan of Chesterton and his iconic Father Brown. The Man Who Was Thursday includes Chesterton's favorite theme of Christianity with touches of delightful humor to enliven the twists and turns that abound throughout the book...

The Napoleon of Notting Hill by G. K. Chesterton The Napoleon of Notting Hill

While the novel is humorous (one instance has the King sitting on top of an omnibus and speaking to it as to a horse: “Forward, my beauty, my Arab,” he said, patting the omnibus encouragingly, “fleetest of all thy bounding tribe”), it is also an adventure story: Chesterton is not afraid to let blood be drawn in his battles, fought with sword and halberd in the London streets, and Wayne thinks up a few ingenious strategies; and, finally, the novel is philosophical, considering the value of one man’s actions and the virtue of respect for one’s enemies.

The Trees of Pride by G. K. Chesterton The Trees of Pride

Three trees, known as the Peacock trees, are blamed by the peasants for the fever that has killed many. Squire Vane scoffs at this legend as superstition. To prove them wrong, once and for all, he takes a bet to spend the night in the trees. In the morning he has vanished. Is he dead, and if so who has killed him? The poet? The lawyer? The woodsman? The trees?

By: Gaylord Dubois (1899-1993)

Book cover Barry Blake Of The Flying Fortress

Gaylord DuBois wrote juvenile literature for decades. This is a boys' adventure story about serving in the American World War II flying corps.

By: Gen. George A. Custer (1839-1876)

My Life on the Plains by Gen. George A. Custer My Life on the Plains

George Armstrong Custer (December 5, 1839 – June 25, 1876), one of the most mythologized figures in American history, was an United States Army officer and cavalry commander in the American Civil War and the Indian Wars. He eventually met his fate in the battle of Little Big Horn in one of the most notable defeats of American armed forces.My Life on the Plains is an autobiographical first-hand account of the Indian Wars of 1867-1869, detailing the winter campaign of 1868 in which Custer led the 7th US cavalry against the Cheyenne Indians...

By: George Alfred Henty

Book cover The Cat of Bubastes

G.A. Henty’s “tale of ancient Egypt” tells the story of Amuba, prince of the Rebu, who is taken captive when his people are conquered by the Egyptians, and then becomes the servant and companion of Chebron, son of the high priest of Osiris. A mystery unfolds as the lads find evidence of a murderous conspiracy within the ranks of the priesthood; but they must then flee for their lives when they unintentionally kill the cat selected as the successor to the Cat of Bubastes, one of the most sacred animals of Egypt. Amuba and Chebron are strong, courageous, and resourceful – but will this be enough to carry them beyond the long reach of the power of Egypt?

Among Malay Pirates and Other Tales of Peril and Adventure by George Alfred Henty Among Malay Pirates and Other Tales of Peril and Adventure

G. A . Henty was a prolific writer of historical fiction for young adults. In this collection of shorter stories we visit Malay pirates, have a couple of tales of India, a shipwreck off the Channel Islands and a bursting dam in California, and finish off escaping from captivity in China

True to the Old Flag by George Alfred Henty True to the Old Flag

This book tells the story of the American war of Independence from the side of the British. The old flag mentioned in the title is the flag of England. This is a book for young readers, but - as a good book should be - everybody can enjoy it".

St George for England by George Alfred Henty St George for England

A tale set in England in the time of Cressy and Pointiers. A child of noble birth whose parents have fallen foul of the current royalty is taken by his dying mother and placed in hiding. He grows up with a bowyer and then apprenticed to an armourer just outside the gates of the City of London, becomes accomplished in arms and joins the campaign in France.A tale of heroism and 14th century viciousness. Great fun.

On the Irrawaddy, A Story of the First Burmese War(1897) by George Alfred Henty On the Irrawaddy, A Story of the First Burmese War(1897)

With the exception of the terrible retreat from Afghanistan, none of England's many little wars have been so fatal--in proportion to the number of those engaged--as our first expedition to Burma. It was undertaken without any due comprehension of the difficulties to be encountered, from the effects of climate and the deficiency of transport; the power, and still more the obstinacy and arrogance of the court of Ava were altogether underrated; and it was considered that our possession of her ports would assuredly bring the enemy, who had wantonly forced the struggle upon us, to submission...

In Freedom's Cause by George Alfred Henty In Freedom's Cause

Another stirring tale from the master of historical fiction set in the time of Robert Bruce and William Wallace and their struggle for Scotland's independence.

With Frederick The Great: A Story of the Seven Years' War by George Alfred Henty With Frederick The Great: A Story of the Seven Years' War

Among the great wars of history there are few, if any, instances of so long and successfully sustained a struggle, against enormous odds, as that of the Seven Years' War, maintained by Prussia--then a small and comparatively insignificant kingdom--against Russia, Austria, and France simultaneously, who were aided also by the forces of most of the minor principalities of Germany. The population of Prussia was not more than five millions, while that of the Allies considerably exceeded a hundred millions...


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