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By: Margaret Warner Morley (1858-1923)

The Insect Folk by Margaret Warner Morley The Insect Folk

Through delightful outings with her students, a teacher introduces her class to the fascinating world of insects. She encourages her students to observe and ask questions. This is a wonderful science text for young children.

By: Margery Williams (1881-1944)

The Velveteen Rabbit by Margery Williams The Velveteen Rabbit

“What is REAL?” asked the Rabbit one day… Written in 1922, The Velveteen Rabbit, or, How Toys Become Real is the tale of a sweet unassuming toy rabbit who questions what it is to live and to love. It was the first children’s title written by Margery Williams (1881 – 1944), who had previously created only for adults. This story eclipsed all others, to become her most famous work, and an ever adored classic for all ages.

By: Marguerite Bernard and Edith Serrell

Deer Godchild by Marguerite Bernard and Edith Serrell Deer Godchild

A young New-Yorker of twelve heard an appeal for the Fatherless Children of France and his heart was touched. He had no money, but he resolved to give his spare time and his utmost energy to support a "kid in France." The French child needed ten cents worth of extra food each day, in order to grow up with strength and courage. The little American godfather earned those ten cents; he sold newspapers at the subway entrance, after school hours, and undertook an amazing variety of more or less lucrative odd jobs...

By: Maria Edgeworth (1767-1849)

Book cover The Parent's Assistant

By: Maria Montessori (1870-1952)

Dr. Montessori's Own Handbook by Maria Montessori Dr. Montessori's Own Handbook

This is the authoritative book written by Montessori to describe her methods. It gives an overview of the Montessori Method as developed for 3 to 6 year olds. It is a short work, intended as a manual for teachers and parents, detailing the materials used as well as her philosophy in developing them. "As a result of the widespread interest that has been taken in my method of child education, certain books have been issued, which may appear to the general reader to be authoritative expositions of the Montessori system...

By: Marion St. John Webb

The House with the Twisting Passage by Marion St. John Webb The House with the Twisting Passage

When Jenny goes to stay with her Aunt Abby, a caretaker in a grand old manor-house, she discovers a wonderful twisting passage on the second floor with an array of colourful characters living in the rooms along it – each of them with a story to tell.

By: Mark Twain

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Regarded as the pride and joy of American literature, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a picturesque novel depicting Huck’s epic journey from boyhood to manhood and the struggles he must face living in a corrupt society. The novel serves as a sequel to The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, another famous work by Mark Twain. The plot unfolds in several locations sometime before the Civil War. The book opens with a description of Huck’s new life as he undergoes a process of “civilization” while living with the Widow Douglas and her sister Miss Watson...

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

If ever there was a story written based unabashedly on adventure and trouble, this is it. There are treasure hunts and murderers on the run in this book that will keep you spellbound. Tom and his half-brother, Sid, lived with their aunt, Polly. Tom was a boisterous young fellow who constantly found himself in rather awkward situations that landed him into trouble. These situations were however exceedingly hilarious. On one occasion, Tom dirtied his clothes in a fight and his punishment was to whitewash the fence the following day...

The Prince and the Pauper by Mark Twain The Prince and the Pauper

A poor young boy from the slums of London watches a royal procession pass, with the youthful Prince of Wales riding at its head. He ventures too close and is caught and beaten by the Prince's guards. However, the young royal stops them and invites the vagrant to the palace. Here the two boys sup alone and are stunned to discover that they bear a startling resemblance to each other. The Prince is Edward, long awaited heir of the monarch, Henry VIII, while the vagrant is Tom Canty, the son of a thief and a beggar...

By: Martha Finley (1828-1909)

Elsie Dinsmore by Martha Finley Elsie Dinsmore

Elsie, young and motherless, has never met her father and is being raised by her father’s family. As a strong Christian, she has many trials within the unbelieving family. Her greatest comforts are her faith and her mammy, Chloe. Finally, her father returns home. Will her father love her? Will her father learn to love Jesus?

Book cover Holidays at Roselands

This is the second book of the much loved Elsie Dinsmore series and starts where the first book left off. Elsie is still recuperating from her weakness, with her kind and indulgent father by her side.The story revolves around how a strong bond of love and understanding takes root between the father and daughter, as they holiday at Roselands, and visit exciting places, with some of our favorite friends from the first book, Mr. Travilla, Adelaide, Chloe, Lora and the others.

Elsie's Girlhood by Martha Finley Elsie's Girlhood

In the third book of Martha Finley's much-loved Elsie Dinsmore series, Elsie's life is traced from the tender age of 12 or 13 to the mature age of 21. Her life is not all sunshine and roses, but she is secure in the love of the Lord and her family.

Book cover Elsie's Womanhood

The fourth book in the Elsie Dinsmore series, Elsie grows into a young woman. She marries her father's old friend, Edward Travilla, and together start a family. The latter half of the book occurs during the Civil War.

Book cover Elsie's Motherhood

After the Civil War, Elsie and her family return to their home in the South, dealing with the upheaval that the Reconstruction Era brought during the years after the war.

Book cover Elsie's Kith and Kin
Book cover Elsie on the Hudson

By: Mary A. Hamilton

The Story of Abraham Lincoln by Mary A. Hamilton The Story of Abraham Lincoln

In this biography for young adults, Mary A. Hamilton gives a British person’s perspective on the 16th President of the United States. A glowing tribute to “Honest Abe”, the author traces Lincoln’s ancestral roots and recounts his birth in Kentucky, his youth in Indiana, his adult life in Illinois and his years in the White House. She also provides a good background on the causes and course of the American Civil War. Hamilton is not always historically precise. For example, she erroneously names Jefferson Davis as the Southern Democratic candidate for president running against Lincoln and Douglas in 1860 rather than John C...

By: Mary Eleanor Wilkins Freeman (1852-1930)

Book cover The Green Door
Book cover Young Lucretia and Other Stories

By: Mary Esther Miller MacGregor (1876-1961)

Book cover Stories from the Ballads Told to the Children

By: Mary Everest Boole (1832-1916)

Philosophy and Fun of Algebra by Mary Everest Boole Philosophy and Fun of Algebra

Mary Everest Boole (1832-1916) was born Mary Everest in England and spent her early years in France. She married mathematician George Boole. She was the author of several works on teaching and teaching mathematics in particular. This short book, Philosophy and Fun of Algebra, is meant to be read by children and introduces algebra and logic. She uses the word “algebra” broadly, defining it as a “method of solving problems by honest confession of one’s ignorance”. Using this definition, Boole introduces, in a conversational manner, the concepts of logic and algebra, illustrating these concepts with stories and anecdotes, often from biblical sources...

By: Mary Finley Leonard (1862-)

Book cover The Story of the Big Front Door

By: Mary Godolphin (1781-1864)

Robinson Crusoe in Words of One Syllable by Mary Godolphin Robinson Crusoe in Words of One Syllable

Mary Godolphin was the pseudonym of Lucy Aikin who undertook translating great literature into single-syllable words so that young readers could enjoy plots that were considerably more interesting than, say, the McGuffey readers of the 1880’s or the “Dick and Jane” primers of the 1950s (still around today as “decodable readers” in elementary schools). She produced this volume based on Daniel Defoe’s most famous work, considered by many to be the first English novel (1719). She also rendered Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress and Wyss’ Swiss Family Robinson, which she translated as well.

By: Mary Grant Bruce (1878-1958)

Captain Jim by Mary Grant Bruce Captain Jim

This book is about Norah Linton, her brother Jim, her father David and Jim's chum Wally from Australia. They all move to England during WWI because Jim and Wally want to fight in the war.When a Irish friend of the family dies, Norah inherits a big house in Surrey: Homewood. To keep up the Irishman's memory they want to use the house to help the war effort. They turn it into a home for "Tired People"--soldiers recovering from injuries, or soldiers on leave that have no family to go home to, can come here to have a good time and enjoy the country-side, so that they can go back to their regiments fully rested and restored...

A Little Bush Maid by Mary Grant Bruce A Little Bush Maid

An Australian childrens' classic about life on a ranch around the same time of A Little Florida Lady, with a similarly plucky tomboy heroine. Also, like the latter story, expect some racial stereotyping of Asian and Aboriginal characters. This originally ran as a newspaper serial and it shows in the episodic nature of the chapters, such as a vivid trip to the circus sandwiched by talk of a mad killer and an unexpectedly sentimental ending.

By: Mary Hazelton Blanchard Wade (1860-1936)

Book cover Our Little German Cousin

This book is part of the "Our Little Cousin" series, written for North American children to tell them about their 'cousins' from other parts of the world. Embark on a journey to 19th Century Germany with Bertha, Gretchen and Hans. They live in a toy-making village in the Black Forest. Learn about their work and customs; get to know facts and lore, hear about architecture, music and more. ( Claudia Salto)

By: Mary Knight Potter (?-1915)

Peggy's Trial by Mary Knight Potter Peggy's Trial

Ten-year old Peggy Clayton and her two younger brothers, Teddy and Harry, live with their father, Dr. Clayton, and Nurse, a woman who has taken care of them since the death of their mother when Peggy was five. Peggy is a sweet and kind little girl with a big imagination and a great sense of fun. Peggy's Trial follows her adventures with her friends at school, the mischief she and her brothers cause poor old Nurse, and even Peggy’s being chased by a bull. But nothing can prepare Peggy, Teddy and Harry when they fear they may lose their beloved father to a stepmother.

By: Mary L. Code

Book cover Left at Home or, The Heart's Resting Place

By: Mary Louisa Molesworth (1839-1921)

Book cover The Palace in the Garden

The Palace in the Garden is the engaging story of three orphans sent to live in the mysterious country cottage of Rosebuds. The inquisitive children piece together the unexpected mystery of the Palace in the garden & all that goes with it. The story has a few twists. This book put me in mind of the Secret Garden.(Introduction by ilianthe)

Book cover Carved Lions

When two life sized carved lions from the east are given as a gift to an English household, the children of the house are enchanted, especially when the lions come to life and help take care of them. This is a delightful book for young girls but retains some adult appeal. The author Mrs Molesworth has been called "the Jane Austen of the nursery.

By: Mary MacGregor

Stories of King Arthur's Knights Told to the Children by Mary MacGregor Stories of King Arthur's Knights Told to the Children

A collection of Arthurian tales retold for children.

By: Mary Macleod (?/?)

Stories from the Faerie Queene by Mary Macleod Stories from the Faerie Queene

"The object of this volume is to excite interest in one of the greatest poems of English literature, which for all its greatness is but little read and known--to excite this interest not only in young persons who are not yet able to read "The Faerie Queene," with its archaisms of language, its distant ways and habits of life and thought, its exquisite melodies that only a cultivated ear can catch and appreciate, but also in adults." (From the Author's introduction)

By: Mary Mapes Dodge (1831-1905)

Hans Brinker by Mary Mapes Dodge Hans Brinker

Mary Mapes Dodge created an instant bestseller with “Hans Brinker or The Silver Skates.” She wanted the book to be partly a book of travels and partly a domestic story. It is a tale written for children that adults also find interesting and uplifting. Dodge writes as if she is sending a series of letters from Holland to children in America, and her you-are-there perspective is aided by a nice attention to detail and vivid imagery.The Brinkers are a poor but stoic family under a dark cloud – Raff, the man of the house, fell from the dikes while reinforcing them during a bad storm, and for ten years he has been in a vegetative state...

Book cover Po-No-Kah An Indian Tale of Long Ago

By: Mary Russell Mitford (1787-1855)

Book cover The Ground-Ash

By: Mary Stoyell Stimpson

The Child's Book of American Biography by Mary Stoyell Stimpson The Child's Book of American Biography

In every country there have been certain men and women whose busy lives have made the world better or wiser. The names of such are heard so often that every child should know a few facts about them. It is hoped the very short stories told here may make boys and girls eager to learn more about these famous people. (from the Forward of the text)

By: Mary T. Waggaman (1846-1931)

Captain Ted by Mary T. Waggaman Captain Ted

When tragedy hits his family, in the form of a sudden illness to his father, young Teddy Thornton is forced to leave school and find work to help support his family. Without his realization he is thrown into a world of crime and counterfeiting. Will he do the right thing, or will he unwittingly be drawn down the wrong path? And will the mystery of Heron Hall be solved?

By: Matilda Chaplin Ayrton (1846-1883)

Book cover Child-Life in Japan and Japanese Child Stories

By: Matilda Coxe Evans Stevenson (1849-1915)

Book cover The Religious Life of the Zuñi Child

By: Maud Lindsay (1874-1941)

Book cover Story-teller

Are you a story teller? Almost all of us are, you know. Well, these 12 stories were written by Maud Lindsay to be told by someone who can weave the magic thread of speech into a performance that will hold the children spellbound. And we don't need to be perfect, just willing to tell a story; that is really all children ask, someone willing to tell a story. 8 of Librivox's Story tellers have volunteered to tell these enchanting tales (and sometimes sing the sweet little melodies that are included...

By: Maud Menefee

Book cover Child Stories from the Masters Being a Few Modest Interpretations of Some Phases of the Master Works Done in a Child Way

By: Maurice Maeterlinck (1862-1949)

Book cover Blue Bird for Children

One of the strongest pieces of imaginative writing for children that the past decade has produced and one of the most delicate and beautiful of all times, is "The Blue Bird," by Maurice Maeterlinck, written as a play, and very successfully produced on the stage. Georgette Leblanc (Madame Maurice Maeterlinck), has rendered this play in story form for children, under the title "The Children's Blue Bird," and in this form it has now been carefully edited and arranged for schools. On the night of Christmas a boy and a girl, Tyltil and Mytil, are visited by Fairy Berilyuna...

By: Mildred A. Wirt Benson (1905-2002)

Clock Strikes Thirteen by Mildred A. Wirt Benson Clock Strikes Thirteen

Penny Parker is a teen-aged sleuth and amateur reporter who has an uncanny knack for uncovering and solving unusual, sometimes bizarre mysteries. The only daughter of widower Anthony Parker, publisher of the "Riverview Star," Penny has been raised to be self-sufficient, outspoken, innovative, and extraordinarily tenacious. Her cheerful, chatty manner belies a shrewd and keenly observant mind. Penny was the creation of Mildred A. Wirt, who was also the author of the original Nancy Drew series (under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene)...

Clue of the Silken Ladder by Mildred A. Wirt Benson Clue of the Silken Ladder

In THE CLUE OF THE SILKEN LADDER, Penny investigates multiple mysteries. What is the purpose of the singular silken ladder made by the secretive and somewhat sinister old Japanese curio shop owner? How can the "Riverview Star" obtain evidence that a popular troup of spiritualists really are heartless con artists? Last, who is perpetrating the gravity-defying burglaries that have rocked the town ? Meanwhile, the Parker housekeeper, Mrs. Weems, has come into an inheritance and plans to leave Riverview, much to the Parkers' dismay...

By: Minie Herbert

Book cover Willie the Waif

By: Miss Mulock (1826-1887)

The Little Lame Prince by Miss Mulock The Little Lame Prince

Paralyzed in an accident while a baby, young Prince Dolor is imprisoned in a lonely tower by his usurping uncle. He is visited by his mysterious godmother who provides him with magical gifts, including a traveling cloak that allows him to fly across the land. He uses his gifts to return to his rightful place on the throne. Also included are several short stories by the author also featuring princes. (Chapters 12-15)

Adventures of a Brownie as Told to My Child by Miss Mulock Adventures of a Brownie as Told to My Child

Adventures of a Brownie follows the life of a brownie who lives in a family’s coal cellar and the adventures he gets into with the members of the household. (Written by Ancilla)

By: Montague R. James (1862-1936)

The Five Jars by Montague R. James The Five Jars

The Five Jars is the only novel written by James, who is best known for his ghost stories. It is a peculiarly surreal fantasy apparently written for children. While he is out walking, the narrator is drawn to a remote pool, and finds a small box that has been hidden since Roman times. He gradually learns how to use its contents, fighting off a series of attempts to steal it, and becomes aware of a strange world hidden from our own.

By: Mrs. (Mary Martha) Sherwood (1775-1851)

Book cover The Young Lord and Other Tales to which is added Victorine Durocher

By: Mrs. (Pamela Chandler) Colman (1799-1865)

Book cover The Pearl Story Book A Collection of Tales, Original and Selected

By: Mrs. Molesworth (1839-1921)

The Thirteen Little Black Pigs and Other Stories by Mrs. Molesworth The Thirteen Little Black Pigs and Other Stories

By: Mrs. O. F. Walton (1849-1939)

Book cover Christie's Old Organ

Christie is all alone in the world after his mother dies. He lives in a boarding house and every night creeps up the attic stairs to hear an old barrel organ play. One night while he is listening, the organ stops and Christie hears a thump. What has happened? What should Christie do?

By: Nancy Byrd Turner (1880-)

Book cover Zodiac Town The Rhymes of Amos and Ann

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne The Scarlet Letter

A beautiful woman who is punished for the mortal sin of loving a man other than her husband, a cowardly lover, a vengeful husband, a rebellious illegitimate child and the oppressive and patriarchal morality of 17th century Puritanism in Boston. Together these form an unforgettable and thought-provoking glimpse of how much social attitudes have changed over the centuries. Nathaniel Hawthorne was the creator of such beloved works as Twice-Told Tales, A Wonder Book for Boys and Girls, The House of the Seven Gables and spine-chilling tales like Roger Malvin's Burial...

Tanglewood Tales by Nathaniel Hawthorne Tanglewood Tales

A sequel to Nathaniel Hawthorne's earlier volume of Greek mythology interpreted and retold for young people, Tanglewood Tales includes more legends and tales of ancient heroes and monsters. In his earlier book, A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys, Hawthorne had designed the book to be a book within a book. A young college student keeps a group of young children entertained by retelling Greek myths in a way in which they can easily understand. Nathaniel Hawthorne also wrote a brief introduction to Tanglewood Tales, entitled The Wayside...

Book cover True Stories from History and Biography

In writing this ponderous tome, the author's desire has been to describe the eminent characters and remarkable events of our annals, in such a form and style, that the YOUNG might make acquaintance with them of their own accord. For this purpose, while ostensibly relating the adventures of a Chair, he has endeavored to keep a distinct and unbroken thread of authentic history. The Chair is made to pass from one to another of those personages, of whom he thought it most desirable for the young reader to have vivid and familiar ideas, and whose lives and actions would best enable him to give picturesque sketches of the times...

Book cover The Snow-Image A Childish Miracle

By: Neil Boyton, S.J. (1884-1956)

Killgloom Park by Neil Boyton, S.J. Killgloom Park

Join Angelo Daily and his chums during a fun filled summer at Killgloom Park, a Coney Island, New York amusement park in the 1930's. A runaway tiger! Tracking down a wanted thief! Climbing down a ferris wheel in the middle of the night! These are just a few of the exciting things that happen during this adventurous summer!The author grew up in the world of amusement parks, providing first hand material for two of his boys books – “On the Sands of Coney” and its sequel, this title - “Killgloom Park”...

By: Nora Archibald Smith (1859-1934)

Book cover The Posy Ring A Book of Verse for Children

By: Norman Lindsay (1879-1969)

The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay The Magic Pudding

Bunyip Bluegum the koala sets out on his travels taking only a walking stick. At about lunchtime, feeling more than slightly peckish, he meets Bill Barnacle the sailor and Sam Sawnoff the penguin who are eating a pudding. The pudding is a magic one which, no matter how much you eat it, always reforms into a whole pudding again. He is called Albert, has thin arms and legs and is a bad-tempered, ill-mannered so-and-so into the bargain. His only pleasure is being eaten. The book is divided into four "slices" instead of chapters. (Introduction by Wikipedia)


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