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Epistolary Fiction (Correspondence)

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By: Kate Douglas Wiggin (1856-1923)

Penelope's English Experiences by Kate Douglas Wiggin Penelope's English Experiences

Penelope's English Experiences is a fictional travelogue, which documents the experiences of three American ladies on a visit to England. Included are scenes in London and the village of Belvern, containing fanciful sketches of a West-end ball, portraits of domestic originals, etc., characterized by humorous trifling and droll exaggeration of English traits. By the author Mother Carey's Chickens, A Cathedral Courtship, etc.

By: Frank Chouteau Brown

Book cover Letters and Lettering A Treatise With 200 Examples

By: William Godwin (1756-1836)

Book cover Italian Letters, Vols. I and II The History of the Count de St. Julian

By: Frances Moore Brooke (1724-1789)

Book cover History of Emily Montague Vol 1 (Dramatic Reading)

The novel takes place 10 years after the Battle of the Plains of Abraham in 1759 when Quebec becomes a British colony. Written as a collection of letters, the story follows the relationships between Edward Rivers (a British soldier), his friend, John Temple (rather a cad), Emily Montague (a young British woman), and her dearest friend, Arabella Fermor (a flirtatious drama queen). Giving glimpses into the new frontier discoveries of Canada, one not only peeks into the personal relationships of these characters but gets swept away by the enticing descriptions of the "new world." This is Volume 1 out of 4.

By: William Hazlitt (1778-1830)

Liber Amoris by William Hazlitt Liber Amoris

Liber Amoris is unlike anything Hazlitt wrote and probably like nothing you've come across before. On the face of it it tells the story of Hazlitt's infatuation with his landlords daughter. Hazlitt was middle aged and she young and pretty, a bit of a coquette from the sound of it. It turned out badly for Hazlitt and the book tells the story of this doomed love. Critics have always been divided about the merit of the piece. Even those who see its merit often feel more comfortable with his polished literary works, and perhaps rightly so...

By: Rupert Hughes (1872-1956)

Book cover Colonel Crockett's Co-operative Christmas

By: Charles Norris Williamson (1859-1920)

Book cover Set in Silver

By: Pliny the Younger (61 - ca. 112)

Book cover Letters of Pliny

The largest surviving body of Pliny's work is his Epistulae (Letters), a series of personal missives directed to his friends, associates and the Emperor Trajan. These letters are a unique testimony of Roman administrative history and everyday life in the 1st century CE. Especially noteworthy among the letters are two in which he describes the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in August 79, during which his uncle Pliny the Elder died (65 and 66 in this edition), and one in which he asks the Emperor for instructions regarding official policy concerning Christians (Trajan Letter 97)...

By: the Younger Pliny (62?-113)

Book cover Letters of the Younger Pliny, First Series — Volume 1

By: George Horace Lorimer (1869-1937)

Book cover Old Gorgon Graham More Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son

By: Mary Owens Crowther

Book cover How to Write Letters (Formerly The Book of Letters) A Complete Guide to Correct Business and Personal Correspondence

By: Ed M. Clinton (1926-2006)

Book cover Untechnological Employment

By: Hannah Webster Foster (1758-1840)

Book cover Coquette, Or The History of Eliza Wharton

The classic early American epistolary novel about the seduction and ruin of a passionate young woman. Based on the true story of Elizabeth Whitman, whose lonesome death in childbirth in a Connecticut inn sparked widespread discussion and outrage, the novel went through many editions and innumerable printings in the century after its initial publication in 1797.

By: Sarah Fielding (1710-1768)

Book cover Remarks on Clarissa (1749)

By: William Ware (1797-1852)

Book cover Zenobia or, the Fall of Palmyra
Book cover Aurelian or, Rome in the Third Century

By: C. H. W. (Claude Hermann Walter) Johns (1857-1920)

Book cover Babylonian and Assyrian Laws, Contracts and Letters

By: M. I. Mayfield

Book cover On Handling the Data

By: Laurence Alma-Tadema (1865?-1940)

Book cover The Wings of Icarus Being the Life of one Emilia Fletcher

By: Roy Irving Murray

Book cover August First

By: Franklin H. (Franklin Harvey) Head (1832-1914)

Book cover Shakespeare's Insomnia, and the Causes Thereof

By: Various

Love Letter Collection by Various Love Letter Collection

By conservative estimates, more than 6.8 million out of earth's population of 7 billion have access to cell phones. This has happened in just over 20 years. It's safe to assume that almost all these people would prefer to communicate via their phones rather than by snail-mail, post or courier. Which leads us to the question: “Does this mean the death of the love letter?” For those of us who still remember the joys of receiving and sending romantic epistles, couched in purple prose, expressing our deepest feelings, these little messages were the most delightful way of keeping in touch with those we loved...

By: George Horace Lorimer (1869-1937)

Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son by George Horace Lorimer Letters from a Self-Made Merchant to His Son

Being the Letters written by John Graham, Head of the House of Graham & Company, Pork-Packers in Chicago, familiarly known on 'Change as "Old Gorgon Graham," to his Son, Pierrepont, facetiously known to his intimates as "Piggy." George Horace Lorimer was an American journalist and author. He is best known as the editor of The Saturday Evening Post.

By: Choderlos de Laclos (1741-1803)

Book cover Dangerous Connections

Everyone probably has Glenn Close and John Malkovich in mind, but for those who have not seen the movie, this epistolary fiction describes how a young girl, Cécile de Voanges, walks on the road to perdition, and is just a toy in the Vicomte de Valmont's and the Comtesse de Merteuil's hands. Readers:Narrator, Mme de Volanges: Nadine Eckert-BouletCécile de Volanges: SaabMarquise de Merteuil: AvailleVicomte de Valmont: Martin GeesonPrésidente de Tourvel: Elizabeth KlettChevalier de Danceny: Max...

By: Emily Dickinson (1830-1886)

Book cover Emily Dickinson on Death

Emily Dickinson is one of the most intriguing of American poets. Since she grew increasingly reclusive, very few of her poems were published until after her death. This collection includes two letters Dickinson wrote to her friends on the occasion of the deaths of her friend, Mr. Humphrey, and her brother, Austin. The rest of collection consists of her poetry on the subject of death.

By: Jane Austen (1775-1817)

Book cover Letters of Jane Austen

This recording includes a selection of Jane Austen's letters, edited by Susan Coolidge and chosen from the collection of Austen's great-nephew, Edward, Lord Brabourne. The letters are mostly addressed to Austen's sister Cassandra, with whom she was very close. There are also some letters written to two of her nieces, Anna Austen Lefroy and Fanny Knight. They include some references to her published work, including Sense and Sensibility (abbreviated "S and S"), Pride and Prejudice (also called First Impressions, or P and P), Mansfield Park ("MP") and Emma...

Book cover Love and Freindship, and Other Early Works

This book draws together some of Jane Austen's earliest literary efforts. It includes "Love & Freindship" and "Lesley Castle" both told through the medium of letters written by the characters. It also contains her wonderful "History of England" and a "Collection of Letters" and lastly a chapter containing "Scraps". In these offerings, we may see the beginnings of Miss Austen's literary style. We may also discern traces of characters that we encounter in her later works. G. K. Chesterton in his preface, for example, says of a passage in Love and Freindship; "...

By: Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)

Book cover Laodicean

The Laodicean (someone whose religious beliefs are “lukewarm”) of the title is Paula Power who bought the ancient castle De Stancy which she is determined to restore. Being of a modern frame of mind, she has the telegraph connected to the castle – and uses it all the time in the course of the story. George Somerset is a young architect who is invited to compete for the chance of the commission to restore the castle and who falls in love with Paula. However, the brother of Paula’s great friend Charlotte De Stancy – of the aristocratic family that once owned the castle – aided by his villainous illegitimate son, sets out to win Paula for himself...

By: Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790)

Book cover Silence Dogood Letters

As a teenager, Benjamin Franklin apprenticed with his brother James at the shop where The New-England Courant was printed. Since James would not publish any of Benjamin's works, fifteen-year-old Benjamin sent letters to The New England Courant under the pseudonym Silence Dogood. A total of fourteen letters were sent, one each fortnight, between April and December of 1722. (Introduction by Darcy Smittenaar)

By: Gabriel-Joseph de Lavergne (1628-1684)

Book cover Letters of a Portuguese Nun

The Letters of a Portuguese Nun (Les Lettres Portugaises) were first published anonymously in Paris in 1669. The five passionate letters in book form were a publishing sensation since their appearance, with five editions in the first year, followed by more than forty editions throughout the 17th century. A Cologne edition of 1669 stated that the Marquis de Chamilly was their addressee, but, aside from the fact that she was female, the author's name and identity remained unknown. The letters were...


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