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Fairy Tales

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By: Charles E. Carryl (1841-1920)

Book cover The Admiral's Caravan

By: Charles Godfrey Leland (1824-1903)

Book cover Algonquin Legends of New England or Myths and Folk Lore of the Micmac, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot Tribes

This work, then, contains a collection of the myths, legends, and folk-lore of the principal Wabanaki, or Northeastern Algonquin, Indians; that is to say, of the Passamaquoddies and Penobscots of Maine, and of the Micmacs of New Brunswick. All of this material was gathered directly from Indian narrators, the greater part by myself, the rest by a few friends; in fact, I can give the name of the aboriginal authority for every tale except one.

By: Charles Kingsley (1819-1875)

The Water-Babies by Charles Kingsley The Water-Babies

First published in 1863, The Water Babies by Rev Charles Kingsley became a Victorian children's classic along with J.M. Barrie's Peter Pan and Lewis Caroll's Alice books. It is an endearing and entertaining novel that can equally be enjoyed by adult readers as well. However, it fell out of favor in later years since it contained many ideas that are considered politically incorrect and offensive today from a humanitarian perspective. The Water Babies, A Fairy Tale for a Land Baby to give the book its complete title tells the story of Tom, a young orphan chimney-sweep in Victorian London...

The Heroes, or Greek Fairy Tales for my Children by Charles Kingsley The Heroes, or Greek Fairy Tales for my Children

The Heroes, or Greek Fairy Tales for my Children by Charles Kingsley is a collection of three Greek mythology stories: Perseus, The Argonauts, and Theseus. The author had a great fondness for Greek fairy tales and believed the adventures of the characters would inspire children to achieve higher goals with integrity.

By: Charles Perrault (1628-1703)

The Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault by Charles Perrault The Fairy Tales of Charles Perrault

This book is an early collection of ten well-known fairy tales. It is thought to have begun the genre of fairy tales.

Book cover The Tales of Mother Goose As First Collected by Charles Perrault in 1696
Book cover Contes des fées
Book cover Old-Time Stories
Tales of Passed Times by Charles Perrault Tales of Passed Times

By: Charlton Miner Lewis

Gawayne and the Green Knight by Charlton Miner Lewis Gawayne and the Green Knight

Published in 1903, Gawayne and the Green Knight is a modern-language retelling of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, a 14th-century verse romance following a young knight of the Round Table. During Christmas celebrations, a mysterious, entirely green knight presents a challenge to King Arthur’s court: that any may strike the stranger a single blow with his green axe, provided he assent to receiving the same a year later. Gawayne accepts the challenge, and its unexpected outcome leads to a great test of his courage and knighthood. A significant addition to this version is the Lady Elfinhart, whose back-story and romance with Gawayne are tightly interwoven with the plot.

By: Clara de Chatelain (1807-1876)

Book cover Bo-Peep Story Books
Book cover Up! Horsie! An Original Fairy Tale

By: Clara Doty Bates (1838-1895)

Book cover On the Tree Top

By: Clara E. Laughlin (1873-1941)

Book cover Everybody's Lonesome

Twenty-year-old Mary Alice is bored with her home life and envious of the beautiful, poised, popular girls she sees at parties. At her mother's advice, she reluctantly visits her Godmother in New York, who teaches Mary Alice a little homemade "magic" and the one great Secret that will put her at ease with other people. How can Mary Alice learn to use these gifts to bring happiness into her own life and other lives? Although this charming novelette is subtitled "A True Fairy Story," it reveals that most of the "magic" in life can be found within ourselves. (Introduction by Jan MacGillivray)

By: Clement

Women in the fine arts by Clement Women in the fine arts

WOMEN IN THE FINE ARTS FROM THE SEVENTH CENTURY B. C.TO THE TWENTIETH CENTURY A. D.BY CLARA ERSKINE CLEMENT PREFATORY NOTE As a means of collecting material for this book I have sent to many artists in Great Britain and in various countries of Europe, as well as in the United States, a circular, asking where their studies were made, what honors they have received, the titles of their principal works, etc. I take this opportunity to thank those who have cordially replied to my questions, many of whom...

By: Constance Cary Harrison (1843-1920)

The Old-Fashioned Fairy Book by Constance Cary Harrison The Old-Fashioned Fairy Book

"And now, mamma, until your tea is ready, we know what you must do," said the children, in a breath. "Tell us a story—a 'real, truly' fairy tale, about a giant and a dwarf, lots and lots of fairies, a prince and a beautiful princess with hair to her very feet, a champion with a magic sword, a dragon-chariot, a witch dressed in snake-skin—and, if you can, an ogre. Don't punish anybody but the witch and the ogre; and please don't have any moral, only let everybody 'live in peace and die in a pot of grease,' at the end of it...

By: Cyrus Macmillan

Canadian Wonder Tales by Cyrus Macmillan Canadian Wonder Tales

This is a collection of folk tales originating in Canada, some from aboriginal oral tradition and others due to early French, Scottish, Irish and British colonists. They are presented as “fables” though many are without obvious moral.

By: Dandin (6th Century)

Book cover Twenty Two Goblins

These 22 stories are told by the Goblin to the King Vikram. King Vikram faces many difficulties in bringing the vetala to the tantric. Each time Vikram tries to capture the vetala, it tells a story that ends with a riddle. If Vikram cannot answer the question correctly, the vampire consents to remain in captivity. If the king answers the question correctly, the vampire would escape and return to his tree. In some variations, the king is required to speak if he knows the answer, else his head will burst...

Hindoo Tales or the Adventures of Ten Princes by Dandin Hindoo Tales or the Adventures of Ten Princes

This book describes the adventures of ten Kumaras, i.e., young men, (all of whom are either princes or sons of royal ministers), as narrated by the men themselves. These narratives are replete with accounts of demigods, ghosts, gamblers, intrigues with voluptious women, astonishing coincidences, cockfights, anthropophagy, sorcery, robberies, murders and wars.

By: David Cory (1872-1966)

Book cover The Magic Soap Bubble
Book cover The Iceberg Express

By: Dinah Maria Mulock Craik (1826-1887)

Book cover Fairy Book

The sleeping beauty in the wood -- Hop-O'-My-Thumb -- Cinderella; or, the little glass slipper -- Adventures of John Dietrich -- Beauty and the Beast -- Little One Eye, Little Two Eyes, and Little Three Eyes -- Jack the giant-killer -- Tom Thumb -- Rumpelstilzchen -- Fortunatus -- The Bremen Town Musicians -- Riquet with the tuft -- House Island -- Snow-White and Rose-Red -- Jack and the bean-stalk -- Graciosa and Percinet -- The iron stove -- The invisible prince -- The woodcutter's daughter --...

By: Donald Alexander Mackenzie (1873-1936)

Elves and Heroes by Donald Alexander Mackenzie Elves and Heroes

This volume describes, in verse, the mythical creatures and people of ancient Scotland. It also includes explanatory notes about about the characters and folk tales that inspired the author's poetry. (Introduction by Matthew Reece)

By: E.M. Berens

Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome by E.M. Berens Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome

Silver footed, fair haired Thetis, Ares the God of War, Nike the Goddess of Victory, The Furies and The Muses, Zeus the presiding deity of the Universe and the magical, mysterious Olympus, are some of the amazing, mythical Greek and Roman deities you'll encounter in this book. Myths and Legends of Ancient Greece and Rome by EM Berens was originally intended for young readers. Written in an easy and light style, the author attempts to bring the pantheon of gods into a comprehensible format....

By: Eden Coybee

Book cover The Dumpy Books for Children; No. 7. A Flower Book

By: Eden Phillpotts (1862-1960)

Book cover The Flint Heart

The flint heart is a stone of heart shape, forged in prehistoric times, that changes whoever owns it into a wicked person. The story of the flint heart's ultimate defeat involves multiple trips into fairyland by Charles and Unity, children of one of the heart's victims. Along the way the reader meets lots of fun characters such as the king of fairyland, a talking (and wounded) hot water bottle, and the mysterious Zagabog. Occasional references to British words and concepts may require some explanation for American readers, but the story is perfectly understandable without such explications. The droll narration makes the story as much fun for adults as for children.

By: Edith Howes (1872-1954)

Wonderwings and other Fairy Stories by Edith Howes Wonderwings and other Fairy Stories

A collection of three short stories about fairies, complete with good moral lessons (as every fairy tale should be).

Maoriland Fairy Tales by Edith Howes Maoriland Fairy Tales

Most of the tales have some basis in history. It is an oral language so all histories have to be remembered and retold. To help with this memory retelling the carvings all have relative information and prompts, stories of Atua (sort of gods) and other people (pakeha) that have been encountered are all blended into the stories.One of the amazing things to listen to is a person's whakapapa (family line). My son's father can tell his whakapapa right back to first landing in the canoe Aotea. It takes hours with the stories of battles, moving and resettling and then the invasion of British soldiers and settlers...

By: Edith Nesbit (1858-1924)

Nine Unlikely Tales for Children by Edith Nesbit Nine Unlikely Tales for Children

Nine original and, yes, unlikely fairy-tales, which include stories of the arithmetic fairy, the king who became a charming villa-residence and the dreadful automatic nagging machine. All are classic-Nesbit: charming, novel and not afraid to squeeze in a moral or two — told with proper fairy-tale style. Summary by Cori

Pussy and Doggy Tales by Edith Nesbit Pussy and Doggy Tales

Charming Tales about cats and dogs.

By: Edmund Dulac (1882-1953)

Book cover Edmund Dulac's Fairy-Book Fairy Tales of the Allied Nations

By: Edmund Leamy (1848-1904)

Book cover The Golden Spears And Other Fairy Tales

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