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By: Charles Reade (1814-1884)

Book cover Foul Play
Book cover Hard Cash
Book cover Christie Johnstone
Book cover Put Yourself in His Place
Book cover A Woman-Hater
Book cover Peg Woffington
Book cover A Simpleton

By: Charles S. Bentley

Book cover The Fifth of November A Romance of the Stuarts

By: Charles Theodore Murray (1843-1924)

Mlle. Fouchette A Novel of French Life by Charles Theodore Murray Mlle. Fouchette A Novel of French Life

By: Charles V. De Vet (1911-1997)

Book cover Monkey On His Back

By: Charles W. Diffin (1884-1966)

Two Thousand Miles Below by Charles W. Diffin Two Thousand Miles Below

A science fiction novel that was originally produced in four parts in the publication: Astounding Stories in June, September, November 1932, January 1933. The main character is Dean Rawson, who plans on discovering a way of mining power from a dead volcano, but ends up discovering more than he bargained for.

Dark Moon by Charles W. Diffin Dark Moon

Mysterious, dark, out of the unknown deep comes a new satellite to lure three courageous Earthlings on to strange adventures.

The Finding of Haldgren by Charles W. Diffin The Finding of Haldgren

Chet Ballard answers the pinpoint of light that from the craggy desolation of the moon stabs out man's old call for help.

By: Charles W. Whistler (1856-1913)

Book cover King Alfred's Viking A Story of the First English Fleet

By: Charles Waddell Chesnutt (1858-1932)

The Marrow of Tradition by Charles Waddell Chesnutt The Marrow of Tradition

In The Marrow of Tradition, Charles W. Chesnutt--using the 1898 Wilmington, North Carolina massacre as a backdrop--probes and exposes the raw nerves and internal machinery of racism in the post-Reconstruction-era South; explores how miscegenation, caste, gender and the idea of white supremacy informed Jim Crow laws; and unflinchingly revisits the most brutal of terror tactics, mob lynchings. (Introduction by James K. White)

Book cover House Behind the Cedars

In this, Chesnutt's first novel, he tells the tragic story of love set against a backdrop of racism, miscegenation and “passing” during the period spanning the antebellum and reconstruction eras in American history. And through his use of the vernacular prevalent in the South of that time, Chesnutt lent a compassionate voice to a group that America did not want to hear. More broadly, however, Chesnutt illustrated, in this character play, the vast and perhaps insurmountable debt this country continues to pay for the sins of slavery.

Book cover Colonel's Dream

In this novel, Chesnutt described the hopelessness of Reconstruction in a post-Civil War South that was bent on reestablishing the former status quo and rebuilding itself as a region of the United States where new forms of "slavery" would replace the old. This novel illustrated how race hatred and the impotence of a reluctant Federal Government trumped the rule of law, ultimately setting the stage for the rise of institutions such as Jim Crow, lynching, chain gangs and work farms--all established with the intent of disenfranchising African Americans.

By: Charles Wesley Alexander (1837-1927)

Book cover Angel Agnes The Heroine of the Yellow Fever Plague in Shreveport

By: Charles Willard Diffin (1884-1966)

Moon Master by Charles Willard Diffin Moon Master

Through Infinite Deeps of Space Jerry Foster Hurtles to the Moon—Only to be Trapped by a Barbaric Race and Offered as a Living Sacrifice to Oong, their Loathsome, Hypnotic God.

By: Charles Willing Beale (1845-1932)

The Ghost of Guir House by Charles Willing Beale The Ghost of Guir House

Do you think you understand ghosts? Now you will.Paul Henley, seemingly summoned to a mysterious rural Virginia mansion from his home in New York, finds himself as a guest at a remote, dilapidated colonial house with a host and a hostess every bit as mysterious as the house itself. Might Dorothy, his hostess, somehow be implicated in the hideous crime which he came to know took place in the hidden depths of Guir House some years ago? He hardly thought so, she seemed so innocent. And yet .... (Introduction by Roger Melin)

By: Charles Winslow Hall (1843-1916)

Book cover Adrift in the Ice-Fields

By: Charlotte B. Herr (1875-1963)

Book cover How Freckle Frog Made Herself Pretty
Book cover The Wise Mamma Goose
Book cover Their Mariposa Legend; a romance of Santa Catalina

By: Charlotte Brontë (1816-1855)

The Professor by Charlotte Brontë The Professor

The book tells the story of a young man named William Crimsworth. It describes his maturation, his loves and his eventual career as a professor at an all-girls’ school.

Shirley by Charlotte Brontë Shirley

Shirley is an 1849 social novel by the English novelist Charlotte Brontë. It was Brontë's second published novel after Jane Eyre (originally published under Brontë's pseudonym Currer Bell). The novel is set in Yorkshire in the period 1811–1812, during the industrial depression resulting from the Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812. The novel is set against a backdrop of the Luddite uprisings in the Yorkshire textile industry.

By: Charlotte M. Brame (1836-1884)

Book cover Dora Thorne

By: Charlotte M. Higgins

Book cover The Angel Children or, Stories from Cloud-Land

By: Charlotte M. Yonge (1823-1901)

The Little Duke by Charlotte M. Yonge The Little Duke

The Little Duke by Charlotte M. Yonge is historical fiction based on the the life of Richard, Duke of Normandy. He assumes the title of Duke at only 8 years of age, after his father is murdered. The story first appeared in her magazine, The Monthly Packet, as a serial.

Little Lucy's Wonderful Globe by Charlotte M. Yonge Little Lucy's Wonderful Globe

Travel with Little Lucy around the globe and learn a little geography and small bits about other cultures.

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge (1823-1901)

Book cover Heir of Redclyffe

The Heir of Redclyffe (1853) was the first of Charlotte M. Yonge's bestselling romantic novels. Its religious tone derives from the High Church background of her family and from her friendship with a leading figure in the Oxford Movement, John Keble, who closely supervised the writing of the book. The germ of its plot was suggested by her friend Marianne Dyson.

Book cover Clever Woman of the Family
Book cover Two Penniless Princesses
Book cover Abbeychurch
Book cover Unknown to History: a story of the captivity of Mary of Scotland
Book cover The Caged Lion
Book cover The Prince and the Page; a story of the last crusade
Book cover Heartsease, Or, the Brother's Wife
Book cover Countess Kate
Book cover Hopes and Fears or, scenes from the life of a spinster
Book cover That Stick
Book cover The Carbonels
Book cover A Modern Telemachus
Book cover Friarswood Post Office
Book cover Henrietta's Wish Or, Domineering
Book cover Nuttie's Father
Book cover Dynevor Terrace: or, the clue of life — Volume 2
Book cover My Young Alcides
Book cover Dynevor Terrace: or, the clue of life — Volume 1

By: Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860-1935)

Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman Herland

Herland is a utopian novel from 1915, written by feminist Charlotte Perkins Gilman. The book describes an isolated society comprised entirely of Aryan women who reproduce via parthenogenesis (asexual reproduction). The result is an ideal social order, free of war, conflict and domination. It first appeared as a serial in Perkin’s monthly magazine Forerunner.

What Diantha Did by Charlotte Perkins Gilman What Diantha Did

Charlotte Perkins Gilman opens a window of history through which we see a small part of the determined efforts made by women to elevate the circumstances of women in the early 20th century.Diantha Bell is a normal young woman desiring marriage and a home, but also she desires a challenging career in new territory that raises many eyebrows and sets malicious tongues wagging. Her effort to elevate housework and cooking to a regulated and even a scientific business, for the relief of homemakers, is a depiction of the late 19th century movement to promote Domestic Science, or Home Economics, as a means of providing more healthful home life, as well as career paths for women...

Book cover The Yellow Wallpaper

By: Charlotte Selina Bompas (1830-1917)

Book cover Owindia : a true tale of the MacKenzie River Indians, North-West America

By: Chelsea Curtis Fraser (1876-)

Book cover Around the World in Ten Days

By: Chester K. Steele

The Mansion of Mystery by Chester K. Steele The Mansion of Mystery

Mr. and Mrs. Langmore were found mysteriously murdered in their mansion one morning. Their daughter Margaret, who was at home at the time of the deaths, is quickly suspected of having committed the crime. However, her fiance Raymond Case will not believe in her guilt and convinces the famous detective Adam Adams to investigate.This book was written by Edward Stratemeyer, head of the Stratemeyer Syndicate, under the pseudonym of Chester K. Steele.

Book cover The Diamond Cross Mystery

Colonel Ashley is confronted with a difficult case: The proprietor of a jewelry shop is found murdered, and a valuable diamond cross is stolen. Whodunnit, and how can the Colonel's expertise in fishing help to solve the case?

Book cover The Golf Course Mystery

By: Chretien de Troyes

Erec and Enide by Chretien de Troyes Erec and Enide

A medieval romance in which Erec goes through many trials until he is sure of Enide’s loyalty and true love

By: Christoph von Schmid (1768-1854)

Book cover Basket of Flowers, The

James is the king's gardener and he deeply enjoys caring for and cultivating flowers. He teaches his daughter Mary many principles of godliness through the flowers. One day Mary is falsely accused of stealing, and the penalty is death. Through many trials and hardships, Mary learns of the goodness of God, the blessing of praying for her enemies, how to consider her trials as a joy, and true forgiveness.

By: Christopher Marlowe (1564-1593)

The Jew of Malta by Christopher Marlowe The Jew of Malta

Christopher “Kit” Marlowe (baptised 26 February 1564 – 30 May 1593) was an English dramatist, poet, and translator of the Elizabethan era. The foremost Elizabethan tragedian before William Shakespeare, he is known for his magnificent blank verse, his overreaching protagonists, and his own untimely death. The Jew of Malta (1589) is an original story of religious conflict, intrigue, and revenge, set against a backdrop of the struggle for supremacy between Spain and the Ottoman Empire in the Mediterranean...


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