Books Should Be Free
Loyal Books
Free Public Domain Audiobooks & eBook Downloads
Search by: Title, Author or Keyword

Fiction

Results per page: 30 | 60 | 100
  • <
  • Page 23 of 32 
  • >
Book type:
Sort by:
View by:

By: Leonid Nikolayevich Andreyev (1871-1919)

The Seven Who Were Hanged by Leonid Nikolayevich Andreyev The Seven Who Were Hanged

"I am very glad that "The Story of the Seven Who Were Hanged" will be read in English. The misfortune of us all is that we know so little, even nothing, about one another—neither about the soul, nor the life, the sufferings, the habits, the inclinations, the aspirations of one another. Literature, which I have the honor to serve, is dear to me just because the noblest task it sets before itself is that of wiping out boundaries and distances."-- Leonid Andreyev, in a letter to Herman Bernstein

By: Sōseki Natsume (1867-1916)

Botchan by Sōseki Natsume Botchan

Botchan is the story of a young math teacher from Tokyo whose first assignment takes him to a middle school in the country side. His arrival there is not very lucky: The pupils are bound to test his perseverance and cheerily comments every one of his perceived missteps. In the teacher's room, he soon finds himself in the middle of an intrigue between the jovial "Porcupine" and the fat "Hubbard Squash" on one side, and the effeminate "Red Shirt" and his follower "Clown" on the other. Will Botchan choose the right side in the end? Botchan - with morality as the main theme - is one of the most popular novels in Japan...

By: H. C. Bailey (1878-1961)

Colonel Greatheart by H. C. Bailey Colonel Greatheart

This is an unusual story of the English Civil War. There is a good account of the Battle of Newbury, and many historic figures appear: Cromwell (very prominent), Ireton, Prince Rupert, Charles I, Fairfax, and Lambert. The setting for this tale of men and arms is taken from the stirring days of the Bavaliers and the Roundheads, of Puritans and the so-called malignants; but the machines of war are rather in the background, while in the spotlight is a witching woman, a conqueror of hearts and a marker of destinies. The story tells of a woman's ambition that "urges valiant men to perilous deeds".

By: John Neihardt

Book cover The Song of Hugh Glass

This poem tells a story that begins in 1823 - just after the Leavenworth campaign against the Arikara Indians - and follows an expedition of Major Andrew Henry during a series of arduous journeys over the Trans-Missouri region.The poem focuses upon the relationship between two trappers - Hugh Glass and Jamie - who, after fighting and hunting together, consequently develop a close friendship. The poem revolves around the betrayal of Hugh by Jamie: who leaves Hugh alone "as good as dead" to die by the Missouri...

By: Edward Everett Hale (1822-1909)

Christmas Eve and Christmas Day by Edward Everett Hale Christmas Eve and Christmas Day

This is a collection of ten Christmas Stories, some of which have been published before. I have added a little essay, written on the occasion of the first Christmas celebrated by the King of Italy in Rome.

Book cover Man Without A Country And Other Tales

Edward Everett Hale (1822 – 1909) was an American author, historian and Unitarian clergyman. Hale first came to notice as a writer in 1859, when he contributed the short story "My Double and How He Undid Me" to the Atlantic Monthly. He soon published other stories in the same periodical. His best known work was "The Man Without a Country", published in the Atlantic in 1863 and intended to strengthen support in the Civil War for the Union cause in the North. Though the story is set in the early 19th century, it is an allegory about the upheaval of the American Civil War...

By: Mary Louisa Molesworth (1839-1921)

Book cover The Palace in the Garden

The Palace in the Garden is the engaging story of three orphans sent to live in the mysterious country cottage of Rosebuds. The inquisitive children piece together the unexpected mystery of the Palace in the garden & all that goes with it. The story has a few twists. This book put me in mind of the Secret Garden.(Introduction by ilianthe)

By: Charles Norris Williamson

The Golden Silence by Charles Norris Williamson The Golden Silence

Trying to get away from an engagement he had got himself into more or less against his will, Stephen Knight travels to Algiers to visit his old friend Nevill. On the Journey there he meets the charming and beautiful Victoria. She is on her way to Algiers to search for her sister, who had disappeared years ago after marrying an Arab nobleman. With the support of his friend, Stephen Knight decides to help the girl - but when she also disappears, the adventure begins...

By: Arthur Griffiths (1838-1908)

The Rome Express by Arthur Griffiths The Rome Express

The passengers in the sleeping car of the Rome Express were just woken and informed that they will reach Paris soon, and a general bustle fills the train. Only one passenger cannot be awoken by the porter, no matter how loudly he knocks on the compartment door. At last, when the door is forced open, the occupant of the compartment is found dead - stabbed to the heart! The murderer must be found among the passengers...

By: May Sinclair (1863-1946)

Book cover Audrey Craven

In May Sinclair’s remarkable first novel, Audrey Craven is a beautiful young woman who has by her idiosyncracies acquired a thoroughly undeserved reputation for originality. In fact, Audrey is a shallow, selfish, malleable person of negligible intelligence, with a fastidious horror of anyone who might be considered a nobody. Her pursuit of the stimulation of extraordinary minds (and her persistent fantasy of being somebody’s Muse) brings her into contact with serious women and men representing the profoundest passions of art, religion, science, and love...

By: William H. Hudson (1841-1922)

Book cover A Crystal Age

A Crystal Age is a utopian novel written by W. H. Hudson, first published in 1887. The book has been called a "significant S-F milestone" and has been noted for its anticipation of the "modern ecological mysticism" that would evolve a century later.

By: S. Baring-Gould (1834-1924)

The Book of Ghosts by S. Baring-Gould The Book of Ghosts

Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould (1834-1924) was an English hagiographer, antiquarian, novelist and eclectic scholar. During his life, he published more than 100 books, among them this collection of ghost stories.

By: Martin Andersen Nexø (1869-1954)

Book cover Pelle the Conqueror

When the first part of "Pelle Erobreren" (Pelle the Conqueror) appeared in 1906, its author, Martin Andersen Nexo, was practically unknown even in his native country, save to a few literary people who knew that he had written some volumes of stories and a book full of sunshiny reminiscences from Spain. And even now, after his great success with "Pelle," very little is known about the writer. He was born in 1869 in one of the poorest quarters of Copenhagen, but spent his boyhood in his beloved island Bornholm, in the Baltic, in or near the town, Nexo, from which his final name is derived...

By: Dorothy Richardson (1873-1957)

Pointed Roofs by Dorothy Richardson Pointed Roofs

Miriam Henderson is one of what novelist Dolf Wyllarde (in her great work, The Pathway of the Pioneer) termed "nous autres," i.e., young gentlewomen who must venture forth and earn their living after their fathers have been financially ruined. Also, she has read Villette; she thus applies for and is offered a job teaching conversational English at a girls' school, albeit in Germany rather than France. Pointed Roofs describes her year abroad, as she endeavors to make her way in the hotbed of seething female personalities that populate the school, overseen by her employer, the formidable Fraulein...

By: Lord George Gordon Byron (1788-1824)

Don Juan, Cantos 13 -16 by Lord George Gordon Byron Don Juan, Cantos 13 -16

These are the last four Cantos of his mock epic that Byron completed in the year before his death at the age of 36 in Messolonghi, Greece, where he had gone to fight for the nationalists against the Ottoman Empire. Juan, now in England, is invited to spend the autumn with a hunting party at the ancient country seat of Lord Henry and Lady Adeline Amundeville. There, he meets the most intriguing of the Byronic heroines, Aurora Raby, and is visited by a ghost with ample breasts (!). That is the narrative outline but hardly the focus of the last Cantos...

By: Charles Waddell Chesnutt (1858-1932)

The Marrow of Tradition by Charles Waddell Chesnutt The Marrow of Tradition

In The Marrow of Tradition, Charles W. Chesnutt--using the 1898 Wilmington, North Carolina massacre as a backdrop--probes and exposes the raw nerves and internal machinery of racism in the post-Reconstruction-era South; explores how miscegenation, caste, gender and the idea of white supremacy informed Jim Crow laws; and unflinchingly revisits the most brutal of terror tactics, mob lynchings. (Introduction by James K. White)

Book cover House Behind the Cedars

In this, Chesnutt's first novel, he tells the tragic story of love set against a backdrop of racism, miscegenation and “passing” during the period spanning the antebellum and reconstruction eras in American history. And through his use of the vernacular prevalent in the South of that time, Chesnutt lent a compassionate voice to a group that America did not want to hear. More broadly, however, Chesnutt illustrated, in this character play, the vast and perhaps insurmountable debt this country continues to pay for the sins of slavery.

Book cover Colonel's Dream

In this novel, Chesnutt described the hopelessness of Reconstruction in a post-Civil War South that was bent on reestablishing the former status quo and rebuilding itself as a region of the United States where new forms of "slavery" would replace the old. This novel illustrated how race hatred and the impotence of a reluctant Federal Government trumped the rule of law, ultimately setting the stage for the rise of institutions such as Jim Crow, lynching, chain gangs and work farms--all established with the intent of disenfranchising African Americans.

By: A.P. Herbert (1890-1971)

The Secret Battle by A.P. Herbert The Secret Battle

Like many soldiers at the beginning of their military careers, Harry Penrose has romantic ideas of climbing the ranks and attaining hero status. However, while stationed at Gallipoli, the realities of war begin to take their toll on Penrose, not only physically, but also mentally where the war has become a 'battle of the mind.' This is his story as related by a fellow soldier, as well as the story of the campaign at Gallipoli which is vividly portrayed from the author's own personal experiences.During his tenure as an officer, Penrose slowly asserts himself; the war takes a toll on his personality, but he begins to live up to his early dreams of heroism...

By: Helen Leah Reed (1860-1926)

Book cover Brenda, Her School and Her Club

"Brenda was used to getting her own way. Her parents and older sisters spoiled her, her friends followed her lead, servants obeyed her, and she was truly beautiful. That was so, until her cousin Julia (who is everything that she is not) came to live with her family. And that's when our book starts."

By: Ellis Meredith (1865-1955)

The Master-Knot of Human Fate by Ellis Meredith The Master-Knot of Human Fate

A tale of two people, and their search for answers to unknown questions. Adam and Robin find themselves inexplicably alone after an apparent natural cataclysm, and are compelled to learn how to survive, how to endure, but most importantly to themselves, how to enjoy, understand their new roles in life, and understand each other. (Introduction by Roger Melin)

By: Marie Corelli (1855-1924)

A Romance of Two Worlds by Marie Corelli A Romance of Two Worlds

A Romance of Two Worlds starts with a young heroine telling her story of a debilitating illness that includes depression and thoughts of suicide. Her doctor is unable to help her and sends her off on a holiday where she meets a mystical character by the name of Raffello Cellini, a famous Italian artist. Cellini offers her a strange potion which immediately puts her into a tranquil slumber, in which she experiences divine visions.

By: A.E.W. Mason

At the Villa Rose by A.E.W. Mason At the Villa Rose

Harry Wethermill, the brilliant young scientist, a graduate of Oxford and Munich, has made a fortune from his inventions, and is taking a vacation at Aix-les-Bains. There he meets, and immediately falls in love with, the young and beautiful Celia Harland, who serves as companion to the aging but warm-hearted Madam Dauvray of Paris. All this is observed by Julius Ricardo, a retired financier from the City of London, who spends every August at Aix, expecting there to find a pleasant and peaceful life...

By: A. E. W. Mason (1865-1948)

The Four Feathers by A. E. W. Mason The Four Feathers

The Four Feathers is a 1902 adventure novel by British writer A.E.W. Mason that has inspired many films of the same title.The novel tells the story of British officer, Harry Feversham, who resigns his commission in the East Surrey Regiment just prior to Sir Garnet Wolseley's 1882 expedition to Egypt to suppress the rising of Urabi Pasha. He is faced with censure from three of his comrades for cowardice, signified by the delivery of three white feathers to him, from Captain Trench and Lieutenants Castleton and Willoughby, and the loss of the support of his Irish fiancée, Ethne Eustace, who presents him with the fourth feather...

By: Lord Redesdale (1837-1916)

Tales of Old Japan by Lord Redesdale Tales of Old Japan

Tales of Old Japan by Lord Redesdale is a collection of short stories focusing on Japanese life of the Edo period (1603 - 1868). It contains a number of classic Japanese stories, fairy tales, and other folklore; as well as Japanese sermons and non-fiction pieces on special ceremonies in Japanese life, such as marriage and harakiri, as observed by Lord Redesdale. The best know story of these is "The Forty-seven Ronins" a true account of samurai revenge as it happened at the beginning of 18th century Japan...

By: Jacques-Henri Bernardin de Saint-Pierre

Paul and Virginia by Jacques-Henri Bernardin de Saint-Pierre Paul and Virginia

Paul and Virginia was first published in 1787. The novel's title characters are very good friends since birth who fall in love, but sadly die when the ship Le Saint-Geran is wrecked. The story is set in the island of Mauritius under French rule, then named Île de France, which the author had visited. Written on the eve of the French Revolution, the novel is hailed as Bernardin's finest work. It records the fate of a child of nature corrupted by the false, artificial sentimentality that prevailed at the time among the upper classes of France.

By: Henry Oyen (1882-1921)

Book cover The Snow-Burner

The Snow-Burner is what the Native Americans called Reivers, and it was a rough and tumble life in the land where Reivers chose to live up to his name. The name was attributed to Reivers upon his proof after arriving in the north country because of his ability to defeat all perceived enemies in whatever means was necessary; whether by brute force and tough action, or by sheer cunning which he had gained living in the city in his earlier days. When assigned to oversee a group of foreigners in a work camp, he treated them with utter cruelty...

By: Sister Mary Jean Dorcy (1914-1988)

A Crown for Joanna by Sister Mary Jean Dorcy A Crown for Joanna

She was born a princess, heir to her father’s kingdom of Portugal, and she might at will have reigned from almost any throne in Europe. But instead of this, she made what to her world seemed a thoroughly mad choice – for she chose to have a throne in heaven. Today those scepters are dust which she would not accept, and as Blessed Joanna of Portugal she possesses a throne imperishable… This children’s biography of Blessed Joanna of Portugal was written by Sister Mary Jean Dorcy, a Catholic Dominican Nun...

By: Marie de France

French Mediaeval Romances from the Lays of Marie de France by Marie de France French Mediaeval Romances from the Lays of Marie de France

The tales included in this little book of translations are derived mainly from the "Lays" of Marie de France. I do not profess them to be a complete collection of her stories in verse. The ascription varies. Poems which were included in her work but yesterday are withdrawn to-day, and new matter suggested by scholars to take the place of the old. I believe it to be, however, a far fuller version of Marie's "Lays" than has yet appeared, to my knowledge, in English. Marie's poems are concerned chiefly with love...

By: H. Beam Piper and John McGuire (1904-1964)

Book cover Hunter Patrol

World War IV has dragged on for 12 years and the whole world is drained and tired of the killing and destruction. One man, a high school chemistry teacher from St. Louis in the USA, is serving his latest forced stint in the UN forces when something strange happens to him. He dies but yet he doesn't. What if you had the power to bring peace to the entire world? What would you do? This story explores a frightening and strange journey into the murky depths of human needs and desires and how they can twist and turn back upon us.

By: A. E. W. Mason

Running Water by A. E. W. Mason Running Water

Although A.E.W. Mason is best known for The Four Feathers, an adventure novel of 1902 set in Egypt and the Sudan (and filmed several times), he was a prolific and popular writer of the period. Running Water, published in 1907, is, like its predecessor, a tale of romantic adventure. Though much of the story takes place in England, the real setting here is in the high Alps, in the range of Mont Blanc near Chamonix and Courmayeur. Here it is that Captain Hilary Chayne arrives, having spent the prior...

By: Agnes Repplier (1855-1950)

Americans and Others by Agnes Repplier Americans and Others

A collection of sometimes biting, always clever commentaries on some of life's foibles -- as apt today as when Ms. Repplier wrote them in 1912. Though less know to modern readers, Repplier was in her prime ranked among the likes of Willa Cather. Note: Section 13 contains the word niggards. I put it in print here so that it will not be mistaken for a racial epithet when heard. (written by Mary Schneider)

By: John C. Hutcheson (1840-1897)

The Ghost Ship by John C. Hutcheson The Ghost Ship

This book intentionally veers in and out of the supernatural, as the title implies. The officers get more and more bewildered as they work out their position, and yet again encounter the same vessel going in an impossible direction. Having warned you of this, I must say that it is a well-written book about life aboard an ocean-going steamer at about the end of the nineteenth century.

By: Emma Wolf (1865-1932)

Book cover Other Things Being Equal

Ruth Levice, the daughter of a rich San Francisco Jewish merchant, meats Dr. Herbert Kemp, and they slowly fall in love. However, she is Jewish and he is not. Can love overcome such an obstacle? And what is more important, duty or love?

By: E.D.E.N. Southworth (1819-1899)

Book cover The Missing Bride

Prepare yourself for a journey, full of adventures and plot twists which will keep you guessing until the very end. This is psychological romance at its best. In the war of 1814, an American heiress falls in love with a British officer. This ill-fated marriage brings together a large group of interesting people who would never have met in other circumstances.

By: Mary Jane Holmes (1828-1907)

Tempest and Sunshine by Mary Jane Holmes Tempest and Sunshine

Tempest and Sunshine is the first book written by Mary Jane Holmes. Set in the pre-Civil War south, it follows the struggles and romances of two sisters, as different as night and day; blonde Fanny and dark haired Julia. (Introduction by jedopi)

By: Edric Vredenberg (1860-?)

Book cover My Book Of Favourite Fairy Tales

This is a collection on well-known, favorite fairy stories, most of which we all grew up with. They were edited and retold in this volume.

By: Robert Henry Newell (1836-1901)

Book cover The Orpheus C. Kerr Papers

These are a collection of humorous "letters" written by a fictional character to a relation in the north during the Civil War. They were published regularly in the New York Mercury Sunday newspaper for the four years of the war. In the letters, Newell pokes fun at northern generals, politicians, and has hard things to say about southerners. Although Newell is rarely serious, I imagine the letters reflect the bitterness and frustration of many northerners at the time. (Introduction by Margaret)

By: Kate M. Foley

Book cover Five Lectures on Blindness

The [five] lectures were written primarily to be delivered at the summer sessions of the University of California, at Berkeley and at Los Angeles, in the summer of 1918. . . they are the outgrowth of almost a quarter of a century spent in work for the blind, and were written from the standpoint of a blind person, seeking to better the condition of the blind. They were addressed not to the blind, but to the seeing public, for the benefit that will accrue to the blind from a better understanding of their problems. (Extract from the Forward by Milton J. Ferguson)

By: H. C. Bailey (1878-1961)

The Highwayman by H. C. Bailey The Highwayman

A romance and adventure novel, set in England during the reign of Queen Anne. The book is much unlike the author's later detective short stories. The actual book is difficult to locate and appears to have been forgotten. It is not even listed by Wiki as part of the author's work, nevermind have any information on the book itself.

By: Florence Holbrook (1860-1932)

Book cover Dramatic Reader for Lower Grades

Despite the title's bland sounding name, this book is a charming collection of 16 plays for children. These little plays—well-known stories done into dialogue—were written for children who like to imagine themselves living with their favorite characters in forest, in palace, or in fairyland. Included are Cinderella, Robin Hood, William Tell, Hansel and Gretel and many more.

Book cover Book of Nature Myths

This is a book of myths told by the Indians of North America to their children. They could be compared to present day Fairy Tales.

Book cover Book of Nature Myths

This is a book of myths told by the Indians of North America to their children. They could be compared to present day Fairy Tales.

By: Edward Eggleston (1837-1902)

Book cover Hoosier Schoolmaster

"Want to be a school-master, do you? You? Well, what would you do in Flat Crick deestrick, I'd like to know? Why, the boys have driv off the last two, and licked the one afore them like blazes. You might teach a summer school, when nothin' but children come. But I 'low it takes a right smart man to be school-master in Flat Crick in the winter. They'd pitch you out of doors, sonny, neck and heels, afore Christmas."

By: Howard Overing Sturgis (1855-1920)

Tim by Howard Overing Sturgis Tim

The first of only three novels by English author Howard Overing Sturgis, the son of wealthy American expatriates and a close friend of Henry James, Tim portrays a sensitive young boy’s affection for an older boy. (Introduction by Dorlene Kaplan)

By: Friedrich de la Motte Fouqué (1777-1843)

Book cover Sintram and His Companions

Friedrich de la Motte Fouque, also the author of Undine, was a German Romantic writer whose stories were filled with knights, damsels in distress, evil enchantments, and the struggle of good against overpowering evil. 'My strength is as the strength of ten, Because my heart is pure.' Fouque blends the Romantic love for nature and ancient chivalry while telling a powerful story about a young man who yearns for that which he can never attain.

By: Guy Boothby (1867-1905)

Book cover Bid For Fortune; Or, Dr Nikola's Vendetta

Guy Newell Boothby (1867 – 1905) was a prolific Australian writer. He moved to London in 1894 and became most well-known for his Dr.Nikola mysteries. This book is the first in a series of five and introduces the good doctor himself. Dr Nikola Is a criminal mastermind with an occult twist and like much fiction of that era this book and the following are more about how others fall under his spell and into his web. Here we have an adventure and love story that sweeps us from Australia, the South Seas, the Middle East and rural Hampshire with our lovestruck hero constantly battling against Dr Nikola and his cohorts...

By: Joseph Crosby Lincoln (1870-1944)

Book cover Cape Cod Stories

This book (eleven short stories) was also published under the title of “The Old Home House”. Joseph Crosby Lincoln (1870 – 1944) was an American author of novels, poems, and short stories, many set in a fictionalized Cape Cod. Lincoln's work frequently appeared in popular magazines such as the Saturday Evening Post and The Delineator.... Lincoln claimed that he was satisfied "spinning yarns" that made readers feel good about themselves and their neighbors. Two of his stories have been adapted to film...

By: Gertrude Atherton (1857-1948)

Book cover Rezanov

This novel by the prolific Californian author Gertrude Horn Atherton is based on the real life story of Nikolai Rezanov, a man who, in 1806, pushed for the Russian colonization of Alaska and California. "Not twenty pages have you turned before you know this Rezanov, privy councilor, grand chamberlain, plenipotentiary of the Russo-American company, imperial inspector of the extreme eastern and northwestern dominions of his imperial majesty Alexander the First, emperor of Russia—all this and more, a man...

Book cover Valiant Runaways

Savage bears, a river rescue, capture by Indians, escape on wild mustangs and a revolutionary battle await the protagonists of this suspenseful adventure novel, set in California.

By: Henry Blake Fuller (1857-1929)

Book cover Bertram Cope's Year

This novel was perhaps the most daring and affirmative LGBT literature of the first two decades of the 20th century in America. In this story, Bertram Cope is a young college instructor, about twenty-four years old ("certainly not a day over twenty-five"), who is pursued by men and women, both younger and older than himself. In writing this novel, Fuller had to carefuly craft his plot schemes so as not to offend the sensibilities of publishers. As a result, today's reader is left somewhat, but not entirely, confused about the precise feelings that characters develop for one another by the end of the book...

By: Samuel Hopkins Adams (1871-1958)

The Secret of Lonesome Cove by Samuel Hopkins Adams The Secret of Lonesome Cove

A body is found on the beach not far from a New England town one morning. Curiously, nobody recognizes the dead woman, and nobody in or near the town seems to be a suspect in a possible murder, therefore most of them assume that she simply washed ashore from a passing vessel. Only problem is vessels didn't pass that stretch of the coast because of it's peculiar tides and eddies; hence its name, Lonesome Cove. Following the finding of the body, the officials of the town start acting a bit peculiar towards how to handle the dead body...

By: Edward P. Roe (1838-1888)

Book cover He Fell in Love with His Wife

James desperately needs someone to help him keep his farm going, but has failure after colossal failure finding a good housekeeper. Alida marries a man only to find out he's already married. She's so undone when she finds out that she just wants to go somewhere where no one will judge her for her misfortune, where she can work and keep herself fed and clothed. James and Alida meet and arrange for a strictly business marriage, leaving loving and honoring out of the vows. The title of the book tells the rest of the story, but the way it gets there is worth the journey. (Introduction by TriciaG)

By: Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne (1850-1894)

Book cover The Ebb-Tide

Three men down on their luck in Tahiti agree to ship out on a vessel whose officers have died of smallpox. Their desperate venture inspires them to a further idea: they will steal the schooner and its cargo of champagne, sell them, and live a plentiful life. The thought is intoxicating... and so is the cargo, which they sample. Inattention nearly brings them to grief in a sudden storm. This sobering experience is followed by another - apparently the dead officers had a similar ambition! - and their dreams of riches vanish...

By: Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894)

Book cover Wrecker

The Wrecker (1892) is a novel written by Robert Louis Stevenson in collaboration with his stepson Lloyd Osbourne. The story is a 'sprawling, episodic adventure story, a comedy of brash manners and something of a detective mystery'. It revolves around the abandoned wreck of the Flying Scud at Midway Island. Clues in a stamp collection are used to track down the missing crew and solve the mystery. It is only in the last chapter that different story elements become linked.

By: Julia Lestarjette Glover

Briarwood Girls by Julia Lestarjette Glover Briarwood Girls

Kindred Spirits return for their Sophomore year at Briarwood College. There’s a new girl who upsets the status quo. (Introduction by Linda Velwest)

By: Arthur J. Rees (1872-1942)

The Shrieking Pit by Arthur J. Rees The Shrieking Pit

The Shrieking Pit is one of Arthur Rees's earlier works, and is a good old fashioned murder mystery story. Grant Colwyn, a private detective, is holidaying in East Anglia when he notices a young man at a nearby table behaving peculiarly. The young man later leaves the hotel without paying his bill, and turns up in a nearby hamlet in the Norfolk marshes where he takes lodgings at the village inn. The next day, another guest at the inn is found dead, and the young man is missing. Can Colwyn sort out the mystery and prove the young man's innocence one way or the the other?

By: Mrs. Humphry Ward (1851-1920)

Marcella by Mrs. Humphry Ward Marcella

Mary Augusta Ward was a very popular author at the end of the 19th century. The arrival of Marcella was discussed a lot in the London news papers. This popular novel tells about Marcella Boyce, a beauty of the 1880s, who thinks she truly believes in the values of socialism. A 21-year-old art student, she lives in a boarding house in Kensington until her father inherits Mellor Park, the family estate which is located in the Midlands. She unwillingly leaving her studies, all the things she loves and wants to do, and her friends, and starts her new life at Mellor Park, determined to help the poor people she sees around her...

By: Thomas Dixon, Jr. (1864-1946)

Book cover Clansman, An Historical Romance of the Ku Klux Klan

The second book in a trilogy of the Reconstruction era - The Leopard's Spots (1902), The Clansman (1905), and The Traitor (1907), this novel was the basis for the 1915 silent movie classic, "The Birth Of A Nation". Within a fictional story, it records Dixon's understanding of the origins of the first Ku Klux Klan (his uncle was a Grand Titan during Dixon's childhood), recounting why white southerners' began staging vigilante responses to the savage personal insults, political injustices and social cruelties heaped upon them during Reconstruction...

By: Marietta Holley (1836-1926)

Book cover Poems

This is a collection of poems by Marietta Holley, better known as Josiah Allen's Wife.

By: Robert Copland (fl. 1515)

Book cover Jyl of Breyntfords Testament

Introduction - This is a collection of ten comic pieces from the 16th century and earlier, as compiled and edited by Frederick Furnivall for private circulation in 1871. Only the first is by Copland. (Introduction by Grant Hurlock)

By: Natalie Sumner Lincoln (1881-1935)

The Red Seal by Natalie Sumner Lincoln The Red Seal

Nothing is what it seems to be as events unfold in this entertaining mystery by Natalie Sumner Lincoln. Red seals and red herrings abound and will keep you guessing all the way through the final chapter!

By: Ridgwell Cullum

The Trail of the Axe by Ridgwell Cullum The Trail of the Axe

Dave ran a lumber mill in western Canada. There are some workers within his organization who he trusts implicitly, some who he doesn’t trust at all, and some who he is unsure about. But Dave is basically a trusting soul. Most of the folks in Malkern liked him, as he had been a major factor in shaping the village and in providing employment for a lot of the folks who lived in the area. Dave was not a pleasant site to look at; ungainly, not very attractive, yet he had a heart that was the antithesis of his lack of physical attractiveness...

By: Eleanor Farjeon (1881-1965)

Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard by Eleanor Farjeon Martin Pippin in the Apple Orchard

The wandering minstrel Martin Pippin finds a lovelorn ploughman who begs him to visit the orchard where his beloved has been locked in the well-house with six sworn virgins to guard her. Martin Pippin goes to the rescue and wins the confidence of the young women by telling them love stories. Although ostensibly a children's book, the six love stories, which have much the form of Perrault's fairy tales such as Beauty and the Beast and Cinderella, have a depth which is adult in sentiment, and indeed they were written not for a child but for a young soldier, Victor Haslam...

By: Henry Gilbert (1868-1937)

King Arthur's Knights: The Tales Retold for Boys & Girls by Henry Gilbert King Arthur's Knights: The Tales Retold for Boys & Girls

This book is an attempt to tell some of the stories of King Arthur and his Knights in a way which will be interesting to every boy and girl who loves adventures. (Introduction by Henry Gilbert)

By: Izaak Walton (1593-1683)

The Compleat Angler by Izaak Walton The Compleat Angler

The Compleat Angler is a celebration of the art and spirit of fishing in prose and verse. Walton did not profess to be an expert with the fly, but in the use of the live worm, the grasshopper and the frog "Piscator" could speak as a master. There were originally only two interlocutors in the opening scene, "Piscator" and "Viator"; but in the second edition, as if in answer to an objection that "Piscator" had it too much in his own way in praise of angling, he introduced the falconer, "Auceps," changed "Viator" into "Venator" and made the new companions each dilate on the joys of his favourite sport.

By: Hugh Walpole (1884-1941)

Book cover Jeremy

With affectionate humor, Mr. Walpole tells the story of Jeremy and his two sisters, Helen and Mary Cole, who grow up in Polchester, a quiet English Cathedral town. There is the Jampot, who is the nurse ; Hamlet, the stray dog ; Uncle Samuel, who paints pictures and is altogether 'queer’; of course, Mr. and Mrs. Cole, and Aunt Amy. Mr. Walpole has given his narrative a rare double appeal, for it not only recreates for the adult the illusion of his own happiest youth, but it unfolds for the child-reader a genuine and moving experience with real people and pleasant things...

By: Mikhail Yurevich Lermontov (1814-1841)

Book cover Hero of Our Time

A Hero of Our Time is indeed a portrait, but not of one man. It is a portrait built up of all our generation's vices in full bloom. You will again tell me that a human being cannot be so wicked, and I will reply that if you can believe in the existence of all the villains of tragedy and romance, why wouldn't believe that there was a Pechorin? If you could admire far more terrifying and repulsive types, why aren't you more merciful to this character, even if it is fictitious? Isn't it because there's more truth in it than you might wish?

By: Charles W. Diffin (1884-1966)

The Finding of Haldgren by Charles W. Diffin The Finding of Haldgren

Chet Ballard answers the pinpoint of light that from the craggy desolation of the moon stabs out man's old call for help.

By: Wilbur Fisk Gordy

Stories of Later American History by Wilbur Fisk Gordy Stories of Later American History

STORIES OF LATER AMERICAN HISTORYBy WILBUR F. GORDYPREFACEThis book, like Stories of Early American History, follows somewhat closely the course of study prepared by the Committee of Eight, the present volume covering the topics outlined for Grade V, while the earlier one includes the material suggested for Grade IV. It was the plan of that committee to take up in these grades, largely in a biographical way, a great part of the essential facts of American history; and with this plan the author, who was a member of that committee, was in hearty accord...

By: Margaret Fuller (1810-1850)

Woman in the Nineteenth Century and Kindred Papers Relating to the Sphere, Condition, and Duties of Women by Margaret Fuller Woman in the Nineteenth Century and Kindred Papers Relating to the Sphere, Condition, and Duties of Women

Margaret Fuller (1810-1850) was an American feminist, writer, and intellectual associated with the Transcendentalist movement. Her book Woman in the Nineteenth Century (1845) is considered the first major feminist work in the United States. Her life was short but full. She became the first editor of the transcendentalist journal The Dial in 1840, before joining the staff of the New York Tribune under Horace Greeley in 1844. By the time she was in her 30s, Fuller had earned a reputation as the best-read person in New England, male or female, and became the first woman allowed to use the library at Harvard College...

By: Rebecca Sophia Clarke (1833-1906)

Book cover Little Prudy

I am going to tell you something about a little girl who was always saying and doing funny things, and very often getting into trouble. Her name was Prudy Parlin, and she and her sister Susy, three years older, lived in Portland, in the State of Maine, though every summer they went to Willowbrook, to visit their grandmother. (From chapter 1 )

By: Grace Isabel Colbron

The Case of the Pool of Blood in the Pastor’s Study by Grace Isabel Colbron The Case of the Pool of Blood in the Pastor’s Study

Joseph Muller, police detective, travels to a remote Hungarian village to discover the truth behind the murder of a beloved village Pastor. (Introduction by Dawn)

By: Augusta Groner (1850-1929)

Book cover Case Of The Registered Letter

A man is found shot dead and the man to whom all evidence points insists he is innocent.

By: Arnold Kennedy (1853-1938)

Book cover Merry Clappum Junction

This is a jolly little book about a little boy, a dog, a train and a house. But not an ordinary train, oh no, and not an ordinary house either! And there are songs, too. The Preface is short, dull and only for the grown-ups.

By: H. De Vere Stacpoole (1863-1951)

Book cover Beach of Dreams

Two sailors, Harbutt and Raft, discuss their plight as workers under the thumb of a wealthy owner. During a windstorm, Raft and his fellow hands must climb a mast of the three-master to control a rigging gone astray. Once they master that runaway rigging, they pause to watch another vessel in the distance. It's a ship many have seen before. We are introduced to the occupants of this new ship, the Gaston de Paris. The owner is Prince Selm, who loves the finest things in life, yet is drawn to the sea...

By: Thomas A. Janvier (1849-1913)

Book cover Uncle Of An Angel

In what I have read so far this book appears to be a humorous character study on two levels. That between the uncle and niece and that of polite society in the 19th century. Anything can happen. I for one want to find out what will happen!!

By: Frank V. Webster

Bob the Castaway by Frank V. Webster Bob the Castaway

Frank V Webster was a pseudonym controlled by the Stratemeyer Syndicate, the first book packager of books aimed at children. This pseudonym was used on books for boys from the early 1900s through the 1930s.Bob the Castaway follows the antics of young prankster Bob Henderson, his parents futile attempts to get him to mend his ways, and his subsequent nautical adventures. (Introduction by Nigel Boydell)

By: Brother Ernest Ryan (1897-1963)

Eddie of Jackson's Gang by Brother Ernest Ryan Eddie of Jackson's Gang

Eddie. That is the only name our young, musically talented hero knew for himself. After being left at a Catholic orphanage as a young child, at the age of nine he is unwittingly adopted into a gang of thieves. Will he be able and maintain his innocence and escape their clutches? And will he ever be able to discover his true parentage?Brother Ernest Ryan was a Holy Cross Brother, the founder of and a prolific author for the Dujarie Press, a Catholic publishing house of Juvenile Saint books for children in the 1950’s and 1960’s. He wrote numerous juvenile biographical saint books for children, as well as several children's fictional titles – of which this is one.

By: Chester K. Steele

The Mansion of Mystery by Chester K. Steele The Mansion of Mystery

Mr. and Mrs. Langmore were found mysteriously murdered in their mansion one morning. Their daughter Margaret, who was at home at the time of the deaths, is quickly suspected of having committed the crime. However, her fiance Raymond Case will not believe in her guilt and convinces the famous detective Adam Adams to investigate.This book was written by Edward Stratemeyer, head of the Stratemeyer Syndicate, under the pseudonym of Chester K. Steele.

By: Hesba Stretton (1832-1911)

Little Meg's Children by Hesba Stretton Little Meg's Children

This is the touching and endearing story of Little Meg and her trials and difficulties as she does her best to look after 'her children' after their mother dies. Father is away at sea and is expected every day, but when father's ship comes in he is not aboard! With the help of her new friend and neighbour Kitty, she finds out that he was 'took bad' on the other side of the world, who knows when or if he will ever make it back. Meanwhile, Little Meg must take care of Robby and baby. There are better days and worse days...

By: Norman Lindsay (1879-1969)

The Magic Pudding by Norman Lindsay The Magic Pudding

Bunyip Bluegum the koala sets out on his travels taking only a walking stick. At about lunchtime, feeling more than slightly peckish, he meets Bill Barnacle the sailor and Sam Sawnoff the penguin who are eating a pudding. The pudding is a magic one which, no matter how much you eat it, always reforms into a whole pudding again. He is called Albert, has thin arms and legs and is a bad-tempered, ill-mannered so-and-so into the bargain. His only pleasure is being eaten. The book is divided into four "slices" instead of chapters. (Introduction by Wikipedia)

By: Philip Francis Nowlan (1888-1940)

Book cover Armageddon- 2419 A.D.

Elsewhere I have set down, for whatever interest they have in this, the 25th Century, my personal recollections of the 20th Century. Now it occurs to me that my memoirs of the 25th Century may have an equal interest 500 years from now—particularly in view of that unique perspective from which I have seen the 25th Century, entering it as I did, in one leap across a gap of 492 years. This statement requires elucidation. There are still many in the world who are not familiar with my unique experience...

By: Edward M. House (1858-1938)

Book cover Philip Dru: Administrator

Philip Dru: Administrator: a Story of Tomorrow, 1920-1935 is a futuristic political novel published anonymously in 1912 by Edward Mandell House, an American diplomat, politician and presidential foreign policy advisor. His book's hero leads the democratic western U.S. in a civil war against the plutocratic East, and becomes the dictator of America. Dru as dictator imposes a series of reforms that resemble the Bull Moose platform of 1912 and then vanishes.

By: Rev. Gerald T. Brennan (1898-1962)

The Ghost of Kingdom Come by Rev. Gerald T. Brennan The Ghost of Kingdom Come

A word about ghosts. Do you believe in Ghosts? Are you afraid of Ghosts? Ghosts are truly real. St. Joseph, St. Peter, St. Bridget are real ghosts. This little book is written with the hope that the boys and girls who read it, will someday become “Ghosts of Kingdom Come”! ~ Father GeraldConsidered one of the “Angel Food” series of books, this volume is a series of delightful stories for children – each with a moral – woven inside the story of a ghostly visitor, to a priest visiting an old castle. (Summary from the introduction and by Maria Therese)

By: Mary H. Northend (1850-1926)

Remodeled Farmhouses by Mary H. Northend Remodeled Farmhouses

"There is a certain fascination connected with the remodeling of a farmhouse. Its low, raftered interior, its weather-beaten exterior, never fail to appeal. Types vary with the period in which they were built, but all are of interest. In this collection, which has been pictured with great care, pains have been taken to show as many different types as possible, so that the student will be able to find numerous interesting details that can be incorporated into his contemplated remodeling." [opening lines of Preface]

By: Elbridge Streeter Brooks (1846-1902)

Historic Girls by Elbridge Streeter Brooks Historic Girls

Twelve short stories of real girls who have influenced the history of their times.

By: Mírzá Abu’l-Fadl Gulpáygání (1844-1914)

Book cover The Brilliant Proof (Burhäne Lämé) in reply to an attack upon the Bahai Revelation by Peter Z. Easton

“In these days,” writes the renowned Bahá’í scholar, Mírzá Abu’l-Fadl, “which are the latter days of 1911, A. D. and the early days of 1330 A. H., I have seen a curious article which astonished me. What did I see? I find that one of the missionaries of the Protestant sect, who accounts himself among the learned men of the twentieth century, a helper of the pure religion of Christ and one of the civilized and cultured occidentals, by name, Peter Z. Easton, has been so provoked by jealousy...

By: Clara Dillingham Pierson (1868-1952)

Book cover Among the Farmyard People

A wonderful children's book filled with engaging stories about various farmyard animals. Each book ending with a moral which gently encourages children towards better behaviour and attitudes.

By: Mrs. O. F. Walton (1849-1939)

A Peep Behind the Scenes by Mrs. O. F. Walton A Peep Behind the Scenes

Rosalie is the daughter of a traveling theater master and is envied by many young girls as she appears to live a life full of glamour, glitz, and glory. But beneath the happy smiling face is a hurting heart, a deep sorrow for her dying mother, and a wretched life. Follow Rosalie as she learns of the Good Shepherd who loves and cares for her, and begins to trust Him for daily strength.

Book cover Christie's Old Organ

Christie is all alone in the world after his mother dies. He lives in a boarding house and every night creeps up the attic stairs to hear an old barrel organ play. One night while he is listening, the organ stops and Christie hears a thump. What has happened? What should Christie do?

Book cover Poppy's Presents

One day, Poppy gets told her mother has a present for her. But the neighbors laugh and say there is such a thing as too much of a good thing. What is the present?

By: Lucy Aikin (1781-1864)

Swiss Family Robinson in Words of One Syllable by Lucy Aikin Swiss Family Robinson in Words of One Syllable

All the excitement, danger, heartbreaks and triumphs of this well known story, but without the big words. Lucy Aikin, an accomplished writer and writing as Mary Godolphin, accomplishes this with apparent ease in this little book. The story of a plucky family ship wrecked on a desolate island, saving what they can from the ship, is well known. The entire family, under the leadership of an intrepid father and mother works together to not only survive in this island, but actually prosper. This work would seem an excellent one for English as a second language speakers to improve their skill in English.

By: Jane D. Abbott (1881-1968)

Book cover Highacres (Dramatic Reading)

The story of a young mountain girl and her first year of city living and going to a high school. She knows nothing of town life, but she had dreams and longs to learn more and discover what the world is like outside of her mountain home. Go with her to the Westley's home, where she finds everyone kind, except the Wesley's oldest daughter, Isobel, who is proud and snubs her. With determination, and courage she enjoys her first year, and longs to continue at Highacres.

By: Frances Trollope (1779-1863)

Domestic Manners of the Americans by Frances Trollope Domestic Manners of the Americans

Next to de Alexis de Tocquville's almost contemporary Democracy in America, Frances Trollope's work may be the most famous (or at least notorious) dissection of manners and morals of the United States. The work was a sensation on both sides of the Atlantic, and particularly in America, where Trollope was reviled as representing the worst of old world prejudices the new republic (though the criticism did nothing to hurt sales).Accompanied by a son and two daughters, Trollope lived in the United States...

By: Frances Milton Trollope (1779-1863)

Book cover Vicar of Wrexhill

A villainous vicar insinuates himself into the life of a wealthy but foolish widow, ruining the fortunes and happiness of her three children, until they begin to fight back. Published in 1837 by the mother of the better-known Anthony Trollope, this highly readable romance portrays the evangelical movement of the Anglican church in a shocking light that may remind readers of some of the religious abuses of the present day.

Book cover Vicar of Wrexhill

A villainous vicar insinuates himself into the life of a wealthy but foolish widow, ruining the fortunes and happiness of her three children, until they begin to fight back. Published in 1837 by the mother of the better-known Anthony Trollope, this highly readable romance portrays the evangelical movement of the Anglican church in a shocking light that may remind readers of some of the religious abuses of the present day.

By: Frank Gee Patchin

The Pony Rider Boys in the Rockies by Frank Gee Patchin The Pony Rider Boys in the Rockies

The Pony Rider Boys in the Rockies is the first book in the 12 part series by Frank Gee Patchin.

Book cover The Pony Rider Boys in Montana

Yee-Haaw! The Pony Rider Boys are on the move again! In this book, the 3rd of the series, the boys have decided that they want to explore the north country. They also want to make their own arrangements for the adventure, with the approval of Professor Zepplin, of course! So they have arrived in Forsythe, Montana, to try their luck in the mountains.

Book cover Pony Rider Boys in Alaska

Yee-haw!! The Pony Riders Boys are on the move again! In their last adventure, they are on their way with Professor Zepplin to Alaska. On the "Corsair", they see gold miners on their way to seek their fortune, so the Pony Rider Boys decide to join in the hunt for the yellow metal. But, as always, trouble is not far behind the Pony Rider Boys! (Ann Boulais )


Page 23 of 32   
Popular Genres
More Genres
Languages
Paid Books