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By: Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)

Book cover Laodicean

The Laodicean (someone whose religious beliefs are “lukewarm”) of the title is Paula Power who bought the ancient castle De Stancy which she is determined to restore. Being of a modern frame of mind, she has the telegraph connected to the castle – and uses it all the time in the course of the story. George Somerset is a young architect who is invited to compete for the chance of the commission to restore the castle and who falls in love with Paula. However, the brother of Paula’s great friend Charlotte De Stancy – of the aristocratic family that once owned the castle – aided by his villainous illegitimate son, sets out to win Paula for himself...

By: George Gibbs (1870-1942)

Book cover Forbidden Way

...he went over to a cracked mirror in the corner and examined his face, grinning at his image and touching the red marks with his fingers. "That was a love-tap for fair," he said. "I reckon I deserved it. But she oughtn’t to push a man too far. She was sure angry. Won’t speak now for a while." He turned with a confident air. "She’ll come around, though," he laughed. "You just bet she will." (From chapter 1 of The Forbidden Way)

By: Amice MacDonell

Book cover Magna Carta

A one-act play which describes the setting and writing of the Magna Carta, including the famous line "now is justice bought and sold" in the Prologue.

By: Amy Wilson Carmichael (1867-1951)

Book cover From Sunrise Land

One of the most renowned of all Protestant Christian missionaries, Amy Carmichael is remembered most for the fifty-five years she spent doing evangelistic and philanthropic work in India. She began her missions career, however, with fifteen months in Japan before falling ill, returning to Ireland, and then returning to Asia with her focus on India. This collection of letters is a record of that time in Japan, and is fascinating not only for its biographical interest but also for its insights into...

By: W. F. Harvey (1885-1937)

Book cover Beast With Five Fingers

A well off English bachelor receives a legacy from his uncle. This includes the uncle's very large library and a box containing something that used to belong to his uncle. The box has air holes in it. It is not a rat or other small mammal for his collection, but it is something still alive; something very malevolent and something very evil.

By: Bartimeus (1886-1967)

Book cover Naval Occasions And Some Traits Of The Sailor-Man

Twenty-six stories of pre-World War I British naval life in war and peace.

By: C. H. Robinson

Book cover Longhead: The Story of the First Fire

A fictionalized version of the self-discovery of primitive man, including: fire, cooking, defense and protection, architecture, community, communication, religion, government, and social interaction

By: Alice Mangold Diehl (1844-1912)

Book cover Entrapped

The story begins with a storm outside an old house and stormy scenes inside between the house’s occupants. It details the eventful life of Zoe Blount, including her involvement in a mystery and her place in a complicated family history. It also follows the course of her romantic attachment and sympathetically portrays her suffering as a result of sexual double standards. The characters’ experiences, particularly within marriage, depict changing ideas of gender roles and relationships in the beginning years of the twentieth century.

By: E. E. Smith (1890-1965)

Book cover First Lensman

The Secret Planet. No human had ever landed on the hidden planet of Arisia. A mysterious space barrier turned back both men and ships. Then the word came to Earth, "Go to Arisia!", Virgil Samms of the Galactic Patrol went--and came back with the Lens, the strange device that gave its wearer powers no man had ever possessed before. Samms knew the price of that power would be high. But even he had no idea of the ultimate cost, and the weird destiny waiting for the First Lensman. First Lensman is the sequel to Triplanetary, and the second book of E.E. "Doc" Smith's classic Lensman series. (from the original book cover and Mark Nelson)

By: Various

Book cover Fantasy, Faeries and Ghosts

In this collection three of the original titans in the field of fantasy literature (Edgar Allan Poe, George MacDonald, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu) take you on a magical guided tour of fairyland and adjoining countries and introduce you to whimsical, strange and even scary encounters and adventures with inhabitants such as good and bad fairies, ghosts and even the Devil. The stories included are “Cross Purposes” “The Carasoyn” “Bon-Bon” “The Child That Went With The Fairies” “Madam Crowl’s Ghost” and as an added bonus the beautiful (and cautionary) fairy poem “Queen Mab” by Thomas Hood.

By: George Livermore

Book cover Take it From Dad

Take It From Dad is a collection of letters written by a father to his son, Ted, at boarding school, away from home for the first time. In each letter "Dad" comments on some aspect of Ted's experience, attitude, or behavior, illustrating and driving home his point with an entertaining tale about human nature. This book is appropriate for all ages from adolescence on, and its lessons are as relevant today as when they were written. --Lee Smalley

By: Richard Doddridge Blackmore (1825-1900)

Book cover Cradock Nowell Vol. 3

Cradock Nowell: a Tale of the New Forest is a three-volume novel by R. D. Blackmore published in 1866. Set in the New Forest and in London, it follows the fortunes of Cradock Nowell who, at the end of Volume 1, is thrown out of his family home and disowned by his father following the suspicious death of Cradock's twin brother Clayton, their father's favorite. In Volume 2, the story picks up with those left behind at Nowelhurst and the question of who is now heir apparent to the Nowell fortune. Meanwhile, Cradock discovers life independent of the Nowell name and fortune is not easy...

By: Stefan Zweig (1881-1942)

Book cover Burning Secret

A lonely, convalescing 12 year-old boy and his attractive mother, who is in a loveless marriage, meet a gentleman while vacationing at a European resort. Seeking an enjoyable way to pass the time, the man schemes to seduce the woman with the unwitting help of the boy. The son, puzzled by the developing relationship, becomes increasingly isolated and suspicious as he loses his childish innocence in this gripping coming-of-age novella. This work is translated from the original German, Brennendes Geheimnis, which has also been recorded for Librivox...

By: Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874-1942)

Book cover Watchman and Other Poems

While L. M. Montgomery is better known for her novels, such as Anne of Green Gables and Emily of New Moon, she also wrote hundreds of poems. Her love of beauty, nature, and the sea is evident in this, the only volume of her poetry published during her lifetime.

By: Constance Elizabeth Maud (1857-1929)

Book cover No Surrender

Written from the midst of the struggle for female suffrage, Constance Elizabeth Maud’s novel No Surrender (1911) is a Call to Arms. It is a dramatic narrative portraying key players and historical events in the battle for the Vote for Women in Britain. Jenny Clegg is a Lancashire millgirl working long, hard hours under unhealthy conditions in order to support her mother and younger siblings, only to have her father take possession of her savings. In order to seek the rights to improved work conditions, equal pay, and many other human rights, she joins the movement of women seeking political representation...

By: Charles Monroe Sheldon (1857-1946)

Book cover All the World

The Great War is over and the soldier boys are back home, but some of them just can't settle down again. Neither can the girls who helped out both on the foreign and the home front. Dr. Ward notices, but doesn't know how to help until one Sunday after his sermon, when something happens to change the lives of many in their town.

By: James Weldon Johnson (1871-1938)

Book cover Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man

Johnson's only novel, The Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, was originally published anonymously in 1912. It is a fictional novel written as a memoir of an unnamed biracial narrator who grew up in the South during the Reconstruction and post-Reconstruction eras. It is a story in which the narrator relates how as a young boy he initially assumed that he was white, and how his notions of racial identity were suddenly turned upside down one day—how from that moment on he was inclined to view himself and the world about him from the perspective of blackness. The novel received very little notoriety until Johnson republished it in 1927, this time taking full credit as its author.

By: May Sinclair (1863-1946)

Book cover Combined Maze

Ranny Ransome is an idealistic young man, devoted to exuberant gymnastic exercises and to fighting “flabbiness” in his own life, body and soul. He loves the girlish and athletic Winny Dymond, and particularly loves participating with her in the Combined Maze, a choreographed, intricate, exhilarating group gymnastic ritual in which the young men and women of the Polytechnic Gymnasium demonstrate their skills. Unfortunately, Ranny falls under the spell of the seductive Violet, a sexual free spirit who wants nothing more than to live an untrammelled life on her own terms...

By: William Combe (1742-1823)

Book cover Tour of Dr. Syntax in Search of the Picturesque

“To bury these, to christen those, And marry such fond folks who chose To change the tenor of their life And risk the matrimonial strife.” This was the humdrum life of Dr. Syntax before he set out on his bizarre and hilarious adventures, presented here in the form of satirical poem in 26 cantos. It’s a lot of fun!

By: Pansy (1841-1930)

Book cover From Different Standpoints

How differently people view life, society, and religion, depending on their perspective! Perry, the often sick young man that is learning to follow his Master; Eunice (Una), as close as a sister to Perry but not a Christian; Eleanor, the selfish socialite; and Tom, Eleanor's earnestly Christian brother, form the core of this story of life, love, marriage, and service.

By: Mark Twain (1835-1910)

Book cover More Newspaper Articles by Mark Twain

"More Newspaper Articles by Mark Twain" fills in the gaps left by the first collection of newspaper articles: "Newspaper Articles by Mark Twain" . The missing articles, collected by twainquotes.com, consist of works printed in the Muscatine Journal, the Keokuk Daily Post, the New York Sunday Mercury, the Golden Era, the Californian, The Daily Dramatic Chronicle, San Francisco Bulletin, the New York Herald and travel letters originally printed in the Chicago Daily tribune. The earliest articles first appeared in 1853...

By: Andrew Lang (1844-1912)

Book cover Tales of King Arthur and the Round Table (version 2)

The tales of King Arthur and his Knights are of Celtic origin. The Celts were the people who occupied Britain at the time when the history of the country opens, and a few words are necessary to explain why the characters in the stories act and speak as though they belonged to a later age. These stories are adapted from the Book of Romance by ANDREW LANG. It is believed that King Arthur lived in the sixth century, just after the Romans withdrew from Britain, and when the Britons, left to defend themselves against the attacks of the marauding Saxons, rose and defeated them at Mount Badon, securing to themselves peace for many years...

By: Various

Book cover Little Masterpieces of American Wit and Humor Vol 2

Volume 2 of a ten volume collection of amusing tales, observations and anecdotes by America's greatest wordsmiths. This work includes selections by such household favorites as Ambrose Bierce, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Mark Twain and Bret Harte.

By: George Griffith (1857-1906)

Book cover Angel of the Revolution

The Angel of the Revolution: A Tale of the Coming Terror (1893) is a science fiction novel by English writer George Griffith. It was his first published novel and remains his most famous work. It was first published in Pearson's Weekly and was prompted by the success of The Great War of 1892 in Black and White magazine, which was itself inspired by The Battle of Dorking. A lurid mix of Jules Verne's futuristic air warfare fantasies, the utopian visions of News from Nowhere and the future war invasion literature of Chesney and his imitators, it tells the tale of a group of terrorists who conquer the world through airship warfare...

By: Various

Book cover Black Cat Vol. 02 No. 08 May 1897

The Black Cat was a monthly literary magazine, publishing original short stories, often about uncanny or fantastical topics. Many writers were largely unknown, but some famous authors also wrote original material for this magazine. This is the eighth issue of volume 2 with the following five short stories: "The Passing of the Polly Ann", by Collins Shackelford: the survivor of a drifting ship testifies to a startling revelation "The Obsequies of Ole Miss Jug", by Jean Ross Irvine: these children know how to bury a faithful dog in style "A Modern Goliath", by J...

By: The Gawain Poet

Book cover Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Weston Translation Version 2)

This poem celebrates Christmas by exploring the mystery of Christ's mission on earth: his death, resurrection, and second coming as judge of all human souls. Sir Gawain is cast in the role of Everyman. At the feast of the New Year, an unarmed green giant rides his green horse into the banqueting hall of King Arthur and challenges any member of the assembled company to behead him with a huge axe and then to submit to the same treatment from his victim the next year. Gawain volunteers to prevent Arthur from accepting this challenge, fairly confident that the challenger will be unfit to return the blow...

By: Nicholas Carter

Book cover Under the Tiger's Claws

Nick Carter is a fictional detective who first appeared in 1886 in dime store novels. Over the years, different authors, all taking the nom de plume Nicholas Carter, have penned stories featuring "America's greatest detective". In this story, Nick is called to visit his banker friend, Mr. Gilsley, who is concerned about some missing money. Also present at the meeting is Belle Braddon, the banker's stenographer. Although the young woman is striking, there is something about her that Nick doesn't trust. - Summary by Lynne Thomson

By: George Sand (1804-1876)

Book cover Countess of Rudolstadt

This sequel to Consuelo picks up not long after the striking conclusion of the first novel. Consuelo is enjoying a brilliant singing career. She befriends Princess Amelia of Prussia, the woman adored by Baron von Trenck, whose acquaintance Consuelo made in her previous adventures. She has also attracted the admiration of King Frederick II, who is Princess Amelia’s brother, and finds that she must tread carefully in order to both remain on his good side and protect her friends from his wrath...

By: G. K. Chesterton (1874-1936)

Book cover Incredulity of Father Brown

Originality and humor characterize the plots of these clever detective stories. The mysteries are solved by the detective priest, Father Brown. His application of shrewd, common sense to the unraveling of a succession of strange crimes and happenings rob them of the supernatural element attributed to them by the credulous. This is the third collection of similar stories.

By: Various

Book cover Black Cat Vol. 02 No. 09 June 1897

The Black Cat was a monthly literary magazine, publishing original short stories, often about uncanny or fantastical topics. Many writers were largely unknown, but some famous authors also wrote original material for this magazine. This is the ninth issue of volume 2 with the following five short stories: "The Man-Hunt of Mendocino", by Frank Bailey Millard: no one can stop the revenge of a mother for the murder of her son "Silas Bartle's Snake-Bite Cure", by Winthrop Packard: witness young Norris' dramatic struggle to survive a deadly snake bite "Tunnel Number Six", by Eugene C...

By: S. S. Van Dine (1888-1939)

Book cover Benson Murder Case - A Philo Vance Story

The Benson Murder Case – A Philo Vance Story is the first of a series of twelve popular mysteries set in New York during the Jazz Age. S. S. Van Dine is the nom de plume of prominent art critic, and member of New York’s avant-garde, W. H. Wright. He rapidly became one of the country’s best-selling authors and the series remained immensely popular for decades, as Philo Vance was featured in dozens of movies, plays and radio shows. Van Dine’s novels marked a sharp departure from earlier detective fiction...

By: Natalie Sumner Lincoln (1881-1935)

Book cover Unseen Ear

Judith Richards is seated alone in her father's library at midnight, when a man enters, rifles her father's safe, and is examining his loot when a steel blade darts thru the portières, pierces him and he falls dead to the floor. Judith meanwhile has remained undisturbed, for she is seated with her back to the intruder and she is, moreover, stone deaf. When she finally rises to leave the room, she discovers the crime, and recognizes the victim as the stepson of her uncle. Detective Ferguson comes to the conclusion that the murder must have been an inside job, and the members of the household come under suspicion...

By: Perceval Landon (1868-1927)

Book cover Two Supernatural Stories

Perceval Landon was a journalist and short story author, and in these two tales he explored the supernatural. In ‘Railhead’, a man receives an urgent message – from an out-of-service telegraph. In ‘Thurnley Abbey’, the titular abbey’s past might be less remote than its occupants believe. NB These stories were first published in 1908 and contain contemporary views on race and violence. It is policy not to alter the published text. - Summary by Newgatenovelist

By: James Thomson (1834-1882)

Book cover City of Dreadful Night and Other Poems

While primarily known for being pessimistic, the poetry of James Thomson is also beautiful and psychologically complex. This 1903 edition, varying as it does in selection from the edition of the same name published during his lifetime, provides a representative look at what has come to be known as his best works. The title poem is a horror-laced journey through depths that are surface level supernatural and at their heart an exploration of depression and atheist existential crisis. Subsequent works turn personal struggles into pure art and praise poets that have gone before. - Summary by MoonLylith

By: Elisabeth Sanxay Holding (1889-1955)

Book cover Collected Works of Elisabeth Sanxay Holding

A collection of 4 short works by Elisabeth Sanxay Holding. - Summary by Krista Zaleski

By: Burt L. Standish (1866-1945)

Book cover Rockspur Eleven

A fine football story for boys. This is another dime novel from the author of the Frank Merriman series.

By: Pansy (1841-1930)

Book cover What They Couldn't: A Home Story

The Cameron family tries to keep up in society despite their more limited finances, by "making a dollar look to [their] friends as though it was ten dollars," much to the harried father's embarrassment and potential ruin. In addition to the financial stress, the youngest daughter has been "bringing up herself," such that she's on the road to moral peril. This story follows the life of the family as they walk the tightrope between social acceptability and financial stability, moral failure and strength through the guidance of Jesus Christ. - Summary by TriciaG

By: Nicholas Carter

Book cover Sharper's Downfall; Or, Into the Net

Bigamy, blackmail, damsels in distress, gambling and kidnapping--this story has it all, plus Nick Carter and his crew in hot pursuit of the criminals. - Summary by Paul Hampton

By: Theo Gift (1847-1923)

Book cover Not for the Night-Time

Dorothy Boulger , who wrote under the pen-name Theo Gift, assembled four original short stories of supernatural and unsettling happenings in this collection. - Summary by Sonia

By: Various

Book cover Black Cat Vol. 02 No. 10 July 1897

The Black Cat was a monthly literary magazine, publishing original short stories, often about uncanny or fantastical topics. Many writers were largely unknown, but some famous authors also wrote original material for this magazine. This is the tenth issue of volume 2 with the following five short stories: > For Dear Old Yale, by James Langston: a game of cards will decide the fate of these six men > The Casket of Pandora, by Margaret Dodge: a young woman is tempted to choose between her family and her career > A Romance of the Palisades, by E...

By: Arthur B. Reeve (1880-1936)

Book cover Social Gangster

This is a collection of 12 detective short stories by American fiction writer Arthur B. Reeve . What makes these stories so interesting is that each crime is solved with the Sherlock-Holmes-like clever deductions and scientific methods of Professor Craig Kennedy. - Summary by Sonia

By: Gaston Leroux (1868-1927)

Book cover The Dark Road: Further Adventures of Chéri-Bibi

One of a series of exciting adventure stories featuring Leroux's criminal mastermind Chéri-Bibi. When the story starts the "astonishing bandit", Chéri-Bibi, is languishing in a penal colony, somewhere in the darkest regions of the French empire. In the colony he has befriended a more noble type of prisoner, Raoul de Saint-Dalmas, known colloquially as the Nut. The dastardly forces of the Parisian, the Burglar, the Joker and the Caid get their enjoyment from interfering in our heroes' lives. Then there are the Chief and his warders, Pernambouc the Executioner and his assistant Monsieur Desiré, for Chéri-Bibi and the Nut, to contend with...

By: Grace Livingston Hill (1865-1947)

Book cover City of Fire

Home from college, Lynn is heartbroken to find her childhood friend Mark, has fallen away from his faith in God. After making some poor life choices, Mark is caught up in a local scandal. Billy, one of the bright young boys from Lynn's Sunday School class, is determined to clear Mark's name. But at what cost? And will Billy's betrayal hurt the people he's trying to protect? - Summary by Emily Grace

By: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930)

Book cover Last Galley, Impressions and Tales

From the Preface: I HAVE written "Impressions and Tales" upon the title-page of this volume, because I have included within the same cover two styles of work which present an essential difference. The second half of the collection consists of eight stories, which explain themselves. The first half is made up of a series of pictures of the past which may be regarded as trial flights towards a larger ideal which I have long had in my mind. It has seemed to me that there is a region between actual story and actual history which has never been adequately exploited...

By: Various

Book cover Black Cat Vol. 02 No. 11 August 1897

The Black Cat was a monthly literary magazine, publishing original short stories, often about uncanny or fantastical topics. Many writers were largely unknown, but some famous authors also wrote original material for this magazine. The eleventh issue of volume 2 comprises the following five short stories: "Her Bare Foot", by William C. Hudson: what is the mystery behind the continued warnings about her bare foot ? "Miss Phoebe and Mr. Lorton", by Charles Sloan Reid: a long-lost letter is finally found to change the fate of two people "A No Quorum Night", by L...

By: John Oakley

Book cover Clevedon Case

Quoting from a "teaser" on the flyleaf: The well-known authority on criminology, Dennis Holt, inherited a house in a remote village, the sort of place in which, to quote himself, “nothing ever happens.” One night at fifty-three minutes past eleven , his attention was attracted by a peremptory tapping on the window pane. A moment later, the lower sash was slowly pushed up and a young girl appeared. “Let me in!” she whispered. “Please—I have hurt myself.” That was the beginning of a bewildering series of happenings in the life of Dennis Holt...

By: Anna Katharine Green (1864-1935)

Book cover Step on the Stair

Green's last published detective novel, The Step on the Stair is typical of her earlier mysteries. Quenton is in love with Orpha, and thinks their marriage has been approved by her guardian. Imagine his shock when her engagement to Edgar is announced. Jealousy rears its ugly head. But then Quenton is made aware of gossip and superstition, which may affect his position in the household. Finding the lost will after their uncle's death could answer all their questions.

By: Nicholas Carter

Book cover Mask of Death

America's greatest detective is back! "Nick Carter will solve the mystery. No crime is too deep for him. He’ll ferret out the truth and run down the rascals. He will recover your lost treasures, too, Mr. Strickland, one and all of them, take my word for it. If there is one man on earth who can accomplish it, Nick Carter is that one man. So pull yourself together, sir, and face this calamity man fashion." Mr. Rudolph Strickland's apartment occupies the entire floor of the building and was crammed with priceless treasure. The robbery threatens to destroy his fragile health.[/

By: Dashiell Hammett (1894-1961)

Book cover Gutting of Couffignal

Dashiell Hammett’s hardboiled detective is assigned by his agency to guard a stash of wedding presents on an exclusive Bay Area island. Just as he settles in for what he thinks will be a boring break from the pursuit of bad guys, the lights go out and the sounds of gunfire and explosions shatter the quiet of the night. A military style assault on the island ‘s rich residents is underway, and only the Continental Op can stop it! - Summary by Winston Tharp

By: Francis William Bourdillon (1852-1921)

Book cover Lost God

The first-century scholar and historian Plutarch tells a strange tale of sailors at sea, who heard a mysterious voice proclaiming: "Pan is dead." This narrative poem tells the story of another Greek who sees the funeral of Pan in a vision and is launched on a quest to find the meaning of his vision. His journey eventually leads him all the way to Jerusalem and back, before he finds the answer he is searching for. - Summary by Devorah AllenLeander: MozartjrHelen: Krista ZaleskiPhilo: Larry WilsonPasserby: Kerry AdamsNarrator: Devorah Allen

By: Carolyn Wells (1862-1942)

Book cover Anybody But Anne

Narrated in the first person by Raymond Sturgis, Anne's old high-school beau, the story opens with a lavish house party hosted by the Van Wycks. David Van Wyck has suddenly decided to become a philanthropist and proposes to give away his entire fortune to the building of a new library in the community, thus leaving his family penniless. The morning following his late meeting with the library committee, David is found dead in his locked study. The Van Wyck pearls are missing as is the deed giving away the fortune...

By: Various

Book cover Black Cat Vol. 02 No. 12 September 1897

The Black Cat was a monthly literary magazine, publishing original short stories, often about uncanny or fantastical topics. Many writers were largely unknown, but some famous authors also wrote original material for this magazine. These are the stories in the twelfth issue of Volume 2: "Sombre", by John M. Ellicott, U. S. N.: can Anita save her beloved pet-bull and her fiancé from the deadly arena ? "The Debut of Mandana", by Alden Lyman: sometimes one has to go to great lengths to make people come on a visit "Number Seven", by Livingstone B...

By: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (1797-1851)

Book cover Tales and Stories

While Mary Shelley will most likely always be known for her enduring classic of mad science Frankenstein, this collection intends to show the sheer breath and quality of her writing beyond the creation for which she is most known. Many of these stories are told in an atmospheric gothic fiction vein, full of eerie old castles, strange revelations and family secrets. But we also have stories of the supernatural and even science fiction to contend with. Shelley was a true literary master and should be recognized for her contributions to literature beyond her most famous work. - Summary by Ben Tucker

By: Various

Book cover Black Cat Vol. 03 No. 1 October 1897

The Black Cat was a monthly literary magazine, publishing original short stories, often about uncanny or fantastical topics. Many writers were largely unknown, but some famous authors also wrote original material for this magazine. We're presenting the first issue of Volume 3 with the following stories: "His Millionaire Client", by Sallie Pate Steen: a clever plan is hatched to claim a convicted murderer's inheritance "The Egg that Ran Away", by Philip Verrill Mighels: a naturalist finds a supposedly new species of eggs "Love and Avarice", by Leonard Freeman Burbank: obsessive love often ends in tragedy "How the Widow Raised the Mortgage", by R...

By: Onoto Watanna (1875-1954)

Book cover Heart of Hyacinth

An abandoned young white woman dies with a baby in her arms in rural Japan. The child is raised by a Japanese woman. This child sees herself only as Japanese. As she grows older, necessity forces her into a racial awakening. And a romantic one.

By: Various

Book cover Black Cat Vol. 03 No. 2 November 1897

The Black Cat was a monthly literary magazine, publishing original short stories, often about uncanny or fantastical topics. Many writers were largely unknown, but some famous authors also wrote original material for this magazine. This is the second issue of Volume 3 with the following stories: "Melted Melody", by James J. McEvilly: witness an archaeologist's unusual experiment in an ice cave "Old Pruitt", by Wellington Vandiver: the explanation why Block 2 was the merriest block in gaol "The Coming and Going of a Washoe", by Philip Verrill Mighels: a little Indian boy conquers the heart of two men "A Problem of the East", by Joseph A...

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne (1804-1864)

Book cover Dolliver Romance and Other Pieces

This post-humous collection of stories, sketches and essays by celebrated quintessential New England author Nathaniel Hawthorne gives us glimpses of the many different facets of Hawthorne's personality. The titular tale The Dolliver Romance was an unfinished manuscript that was edited and prepared for publication after Hawthorne's death and relates the story of an aged man with a small child in his care who swallows a magical tincture daily that rejuvenates his vitality, reversing the aging process...

By: Pansy (1841-1930)

Book cover Hedge Fence

Twelve stories, one for each month of the year, which first list a few Bible verses then relate how those verses took effect in a young person's life. The first 10 chapters are letters written by Frank Hudson to his cousin Renie. Frank is a boy who gets into trouble when he doesn't think before acting. He receives Bible verses as a kind of "hedge fence" he has to jump through or climb over to do the wrong things; they scratch him and give him a prick, and remind him of what is the right way to go...

By: Winifred M. Kirkland (1872-1943)

Book cover Christmas Bishop

This 1913 story is far more than a Christmas tale. It is a story about spiritual wisdom; the seeking of wisdom, the getting of wisdom, even when the seeking and the getting is obscure. Henry Collinton is an 81 year old, widowed, Episcopal Church bishop. The story opens on the morning of the Bishop’s last Christmas and ends with his death that night. We see him encounter four to him important people throughout the day, three friends and the Nazarene, the Christ, he has followed all his life...

By: Pansy (1841-1930)

Book cover Christie's Christmas

Now that the railroad has come through, Christie Tucker's parents have decided to save enough for her to go to her well-to-do Uncle Daniel for a one-day visit, on Christmas, which is also Christie's birthday. It's her first trip away from home -- and on the cars! Of course, the trip doesn't turn out exactly as expected. That one day, and how Christie lived it, has consequences that keep coming! Addressed by the author to girls, it is still a pleasant story for adults, too.


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