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By: Various

Book cover Cambridge Modern History, Volume 02, The Reformation

The Cambridge Modern History is a universal history covering the period from 1450 to 1910. It was published in 14 volumes between 1902 and 1912. The series was planned by Lord Acton, who intended it to be a monument of objective, collaborative scholarship, and edited by A.W. Ward, G. W. Prothero and Stanley Leathes. From the preface: "In accordance with the scheme of the Cambridge Modern History, this volume takes as its main subject a great movement, the Reformation, and follows the theme to a fitting close in its several divisions...

By: Carrie Chapman Catt (1859-1947)

Book cover Woman Suffrage and Politics

Written after the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment and published in 1923, "This book's essential contribution must be sought in its revelation of the bearing of American politics upon the question of woman suffrage." The book traces the history of the women's suffrage movement in the United States from 1848 through 1920. The Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution giving women the right to vole was passed by Congress on June 4, 1919 and ratified August 18, 1920. - Summary by J. M. Smallheer

By: Alfred William Benn (1843-1915)

Book cover History of Modern Philosophy

This book is a brief, but cogent discussion of Western philosophy-- from Francis Bacon and Giordano Bruno through Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz, Hume, Berkeley and Kant, the German idealists and Hegel, and ending with such nineteenth century luminaries as Mill, Spencer, and Nietzsche. Enchanted with Copernicus, Bruno goes to the stake for positing an infinity of inhabited worlds. Descartes, a professed skeptic, manages to justify everything the Jesuits taught him at La Flèche, while Spinoza, in mystical awe, envisions a pantheistic cosmos in which thought and extension are one and the same thing--God...

By: Ida M. Tarbell (1857-1944)

Book cover All in the Day's Work

In this autobiography, written when the author was 82 years old, Ida Tarbell looks back at her life and remarkable career as an investigative journalist. Ms. Tarbell is best known for her 1904 work, "The History of the Standard Oil Company," which was a significant factor in the dissolution of the Standard Oil monopoly. She was a noted writer and lecturer, served on two presidential committees, and is considered by her actions to be an important feminist . - Summary by Ciufi Galeazzi

By: Karl Ploetz (1819-1881)

Book cover World’s Story Volume XIV: An Outline of Universal History

The fourteenth volume of the 15-volume series The World’s Story has a different concept than the previous books edited by Eva March Tappan. This book lists a detailed timeline of important events, starting from the early Eastern cultures till up to recent events from the beginning of the 20th century. The original book was compiled in German by historian Karl Ploetz and translated into English for this series by William H. Tillinghast . - Summary by Sonia

By: Ralph Delahaye Paine (1871-1925)

Book cover Book of Buried Treasure

Described by the author as: BEING A TRUE HISTORY OF THE GOLD, JEWELS, AND PLATE OF PIRATES, GALLEONS, ETC., WHICH ARE SOUGHT FOR TO THIS DAY. Ralph Delahaye Paine was an American journalist and author popular in the early 20th century. Paine's book tells of pirates, heroes, scoundrels, and treasure seekers creating, stealing, seeking, and sometimes finding great wealth. It also tells of treasures yet undiscovered . It remains the stuff of dreams for countless kids growing up, and those of us who never grew up. - Summary by Tony Posante

By: Various

Book cover Smithsonian Institution - United States National Museum - Bulletin 240 Contributions From the Museum of History and Technology Papers 34-44 on Science and Technology

Part of the scholarly and scientific publications of the United States National Museum series: United States National Museum Bulletin.In these series, the Museum publishes original articles and monographs dealing with the collections and work of its constituent museums— The Museum of Natural History and the Museum of History and Technology. These are gathered in volumes, octavo in size, with the publication date of each paper recorded in the table of contents of the volume. Since 1959, shorter papers relating to the collections and research of that Museum have been gathered in Bulletins titled “Contributions from the Museum of History and Technology,”...

By: Alfred John Church (1829-1912)

Book cover Henry the Fifth

A brief history of the life Henry the Fifth. - Summary by KevinS

By: Archibald Grimké (1849-1930)

Book cover William Lloyd Garrison, the Abolitionist

"THE author of this volume desires . . . to say . . . that it is his earnest hope that this record of a hero may be an aid to brave and true living in the Republic, so that the problems knocking at its door for solution may find the heads, the hands, and the hearts equal to the performance of the duties imposed by them upon the men and women of this generation. William Lloyd Garrison was brave and true. Bravery and truth were the secret of his marvelous career and achievements. May his countrymen and countrywomen imitate his example and be brave and true, not alone in emergent moments, but in everyday things as well."

By: Klara Stroebe (1887-1932)

Book cover Norwegian Fairy Book

These Norwegian tales of elemental mountain, forest and sea spirits, have been handed down by hinds and huntsmen, wood choppers and fisher folk. They are men who led a hard and lonely life amid primitive surroundings. The Norwegian Fairy Book has an appeal for one and all, since it is a book in which the mirror of fairy-tale reflects human yearnings and aspirations, human loves, ambitions and disillusionments, in an imaginatively glamored, yet not distorted form. [from the book's preface]

By: Cesare Lombroso (1835-1909)

Book cover Crime, Its Causes and Remedies

Published as the third volume in the Modern Criminal Science Series, Cesare Lombroso, renowned Italian criminologist, collected a wealth of information regarding the incidence, classification, and causes of crime. Crime calendars, the geography of crime, unusual events and circumstances leading to more frequent crime, political motivations and associations of criminal enterprise and an assessment of the real value and effectiveness of prisons and reform programs are all included in this three part volume. - Summary by Leon Harvey

By: Robert van Bergen

Book cover Story of Japan

Robert van Bergen was one of the first Americans to enter Japan after the country opened its borders to foreign visitors following centuries of isolation. He taught English to Japanese aristocrats, eventually becoming principal of the Nobles' School in Tokyo. This book, which he wrote for young readers during his stay in the country, was first published in 1897. It includes many illustrations. From the preface: "Our schoolbooks on geography and general history touch but lightly upon the Japanese...

By: Gertrude Bell (1868-1926)

Book cover Syria: the Desert and the Sown

Gertrude Bell's Syria: The Desert and the Sown describes her travels in the Levant during the first years of the 20th century. In this vivid and painstakingly documented narrative, Bell recounts her visits to Damascus, Jerusalem, Beirut, Antioch and Alexandretta, as well as the time she spent in the deserts of the region. Fluent in Arabic and several other languages, Bell brings to her account a level of insight beyond the reach of an average travel writer. She would later go on to play a highly influential role in the politics of the Middle East, drawing on the knowledge and personal connections she built up during these and other travels...

By: Mark Twain (1835-1910)

Book cover Christian Science

Christian Science is a 1907 collection of essays Mark Twain wrote about Christian Science, beginning with an article that was published in Cosmopolitan in 1899. Although Twain was interested in mental healing and the ideas behind Christian Science, he was hostile towards its founder, Mary Baker Eddy . He called her, according to American writer Caroline Fraser, "[g]rasping, sordid, penurious, famishing for everything she sees—money, power, glory—vain, untruthful, jealous, despotic, arrogant, insolent, pitiless where thinkers and hypnotists are concerned, illiterate, shallow, incapable of reasoning outside of commercial lines, immeasurably selfish...

By: James Gairdner (1828-1912)

Book cover Henry the Seventh

Henry VII, the founder of the Tudor dynasty, less known than his son, Henry VIII, or granddaughter Elizabeth I, is often overlooked. This King toppled the ruling House that had held England's throne for over four hundred years, the Plantagenets, and took a divided, war torn country and made one of the richest in Europe by the time of his death in 1609. Henry VII’s reign was characterized by thrift, prudence, and cool-headed political strategies. The author, James Gairdner , was a British historian. He specialized in 15th-century and early Tudor history. - Summary by Cavaet

By: Margaret Wilson (1882-1973)

Book cover Able McLaughlins

The Able McLaughlins won the Pulitzer Prize for a novel in 1924 in Margaret Wilson's debut work. Aptly described as "Little House on the Prairie - but for adults" the novel follows a group of Scottish families who pioneer the Iowa prairie in the 1860’s. The main storyline concerns Wully, the eldest McLaughlin son, who returns home from the Civil War to find that his sweetheart, Chirstie, has experienced an unspeakable tragedy that will profoundly affect the couple's lives. Their story is one of shame and honor, secrets and guilt, fear and loathing, revenge and forgiveness...

By: Joanna E. Wood (1867-1927)

Book cover Untempered Wind

Upon publication of “The Untempered Wind” in 1894, Joanna Wood quickly rose to international prominence, becoming in the next few years the most highly paid fiction-writer in Canada. In this novel, we find a detailed picture of village life. The narrative weaves through a variety of character types: the refined and the coarse, the humble and the self-righteous, the virtuous and the vicious. All these types are measured according to their treatment of Myron Holder, a young unwed mother — a “fallen woman” in the eyes of this “spiteful, narrow-minded village...

By: Various

Book cover Myths and Legends Around the World - Collection 06

You get to choose what you want to read! So long as the source is Public Domain for you, any short story or chapter that tells of legends, heroes, myths, or ancient lore, is welcome. We are looking for representations of many different cultures within each collection. If you have questions of whether a source is Public Domain for you , I recommend asking about that in this project's discussion before you begin recording. Simply post the question with a link to the source you've found. :) Limit of 2 sections per reader in a given Myths & Legends collection. - Summary by Lynette Caulkins

By: Frank Webb (1828-1894)

Book cover Garies and their Friends

The book which now appears before the public may be of interest in relation to a question which the late agitation of the subject of slavery has raised in many thoughtful minds, viz. — Are the race at present held as slaves capable of freedom, self-government, and progress. The author is a coloured young man, born and reared in the city of Philadelphia. This city, standing as it does on the frontier between free and slave territory, has accumulated naturally a large population of the mixed and African race...

By: Walter Waddington Shirley (1828-1866)

Book cover Scholasticism: A Lecture Delivered Before the University of Oxford

Walter Waddington Shirley was made Regius Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Canon of Christ Church, Oxford in 1863. This short work comprises the text of a lecture he gave at Oxford University in January, 1866. In it, he describes the historical setting in which scholasticism flourished and then summarizes its features. - Summary by Barry Ganong

By: James Ford Rhodes (1848-1927)

Book cover History of the Civil War, 1861-1865

Superbly written, this overview of the Civil War, won a Pulitzer Prize in History in 1918. Rhodes covers not only the battles and the generals of the war but gives us a good deal of insight into the politics, economics, international relations and the strategy/thinking of the times. When at times he brings forth an opinion it is clearly stated, so as not to be confused with the facts. Comprehensive and enjoyable, you will find this History of the Civil War both illuminating and captivating. NOTE: Footnotes will not be read but can be found online at https://archive.org/details/historycivilwar01rhodgoog/mode/2up.

By: Allen Glasser (1908-1971)

Book cover Martian

The water was evaporated by the ever-shining sun until there was none left for the thirsty plants. Every year more workers died in misery. A stranger from another world comes and experiences the attempts by two different cultures with different languages to understand what the other wants. Not all educated cultures are cordial or sympathetic to new arrivals. This book explores one potential outcome of the meeting of alien races. - Summary by Paul Harvey

By: Various

Book cover Myths and Legends Around the World - Collection 07

This collection is dedicated to recordings of short mythical or legendary works which are in the Public Domain. The stories tell of legends, heroes, myths, and ancient lore from many different cultures.

By: William Satchell (1861-1942)

Book cover Greenstone Door

The Greenstone Door is a historical novel, set between 1830-1860’s New Zealand. The main character, Cedric Tregarthen, is remembering his past, telling the story both from his vantage point as an old man remembering, and as a young man experiencing his life. The story starts with the sack of the Te Kuma pa and the death of his father, his subsequent adoption by the trader Purcell and protection of Te Waharoa. He grows up among the Maori people, with his foster sister Puhi-Huia and his friend, Rangiora...

By: Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797)

Book cover Original Stories from Real Life

Mary Wollstonecraft was one of the early promoters of gender equality long before other crusaders took up the cause. She is perhaps best known for her books, “A Vindication of the Rights of Women” and “A Vindication of the Rights of Men” . But she also wrote widely on education and used fiction formats to promote her progressive views. This book using the genre of didactic children’s stories, was written the same year as her “Mary: A Fiction” 1788, but was first published anonymously...

By: Martha Finley (1828-1909)

Book cover Mildred at Home: With Something About Her Relatives and Friends

Book 5 of the story of Mildred Keith by Martha Finley. We join Mildred as she settles into home life as wife and mother. We also see the rest of the Keith children begin to make starts of their own - some near to home, and others far away and perhaps lost forever. The Dinsmore cousins continue to be part of the story as well. - Summary by Michelle Hannah

By: Herbert Wildon Carr (1857-1931)

Book cover Problem of Truth

A problem of philosophy is completely different from a problem of science. In science we accept our subject-matter as it is presented in unanalysed experience; in philosophy we examine the first principles and ultimate questions that concern conscious experience itself. The problem of truth is a problem of philosophy. It is not a problem of merely historical interest, but a present problem—a living controversy, the issue of which is undecided. Its present interest may be said to centre round the doctrine of pragmatism, which some fifteen years ago began to challenge the generally accepted principles of philosophy...

By: Rudolf Virchow (1821-1902)

Book cover On Famine Fever and Some of the Other Cognate Forms of Typhus

Rudolf Virchow , professor of medicine and pathology at the Charité Hospital in Berlin, published more than 2000 papers and dozens of books. His investigation of the 1847-1848 typhus epidemic in Upper Silesia laid the foundations of public health in Germany. During the Revolution of 1848, Virchow helped found a journal promoting medicine as a social science. For physicians, his contributions to the understanding of the pathophysiology of disease and to the working vocabulary of medicine were fundamental, but Virchow also believed that social injustice and political oppression lay at the heart of many illnesses and that "the physician is the natural attorney of the poor."

By: Sir Frederick Maurice Powicke (1879-1963)

Book cover Bismarck and the Origin of the German Empire

Despite its brevity, this Little Blue Book #142 by the Oxford historian, Sir F.M. Powicke, provides a valuable overview of the political history of Germany from medieval to modern times, culminating in the career of Otto von Bismarck , the Prussian Junker who masterminded the unification of Germany and served as its first Chancellor. - Summary by Pamela Nagami, M.D.

By: Various

Book cover Myths and Legends Around the World - Collection 08

This collection is dedicated to recordings of short mythical or legendary works which are in the Public Domain. The stories tell of legends, heroes, myths, and ancient lore from many different cultures.

By: Abdullah Ibn al-Muqaffaʿ (724-759)

Book cover Fables of Pilpay

These moralistic stories within stories date back to the Sanskrit text Panchatantra . They were first translated into Arabic by a Persian named Ruzbeh who named it Book of Kalilah and Dimna and then by Abdullah Ibn al-Muqaffa and later Joseph Harris in 1679 and then remodeled in 1818. Max Mueller noted that La Fontaine was indebted to the work and other scholars have noted that Jeanne-Marie LePrince de Beaumont and John Fletcher were both familiar with the fables. The Fables of Pilpay are a series of inter-woven fables, many of which deploy metaphors of anthropomorphized animals with human virtues and vices.

By: Johan Huizinga (1872-1945)

Book cover waning of the middle ages: a study of the forms of life, thought and art in France and the Netherlands in the XIVth and XVth centuries

The Waning of the Middle Ages , subtitled A study of the forms of life, thought and art in France and the Netherlands in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, is Johan Huizinga's most famous work. It was published in 1919 as Herfsttij der Middeleeuwen and first translated into English in 1924. Huizinga defends the idea that the exaggerated formality and romanticism of late medieval court society was a defense mechanism against the constantly increasing violence and brutality of life. The break off between Middle Ages and Renaissance was, according to him, a period of pessimism, cultural exhaustion, and nostalgia...

By: Rufus Jones (1863-1948)

Book cover Nature and Authority of Conscience

Rufus Matthew Jones was an American religious leader, writer, magazine editor, philosopher, and college professor. He was instrumental in the establishment of the Haverford Emergency Unit . One of the most influential Quakers of the 20th century, he was a Quaker historian and theologian as well as a philosopher. In 1917 he helped found the American Friends Service Committee. This work was delivered as a Swarthmore Lecture in August 1920 and was printed by the Swarthmore Press Ltd.

By: Olive Schreiner (1855-1920)

Book cover Thoughts on South Africa

'Thoughts on South Africa' is a collection of Schreiner's observations of colonial South Africa in the early 19th century, mostly regarding Boer-English relations. The book was published posthumously in 1923. Prospective listeners should be aware that it reflects the place, culture and language of the time in which it was written.

By: Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900)

Book cover Early Greek Philosophy & Other Essays (Version 2)

“The essays contained in this volume treat of various subjects. With the exception of perhaps one we must consider all these papers as fragments. Written during the early Seventies, and intended mostly as prefaces, they are extremely interesting, since traces of Nietzsche's later tenets—like Slave and Master morality, the Superman—can be found everywhere. But they are also very valuable on account of the young philosopher's daring and able handling of difficult and abstruse subjects. "Truth and Falsity," and "The Greek Woman" are probably the two essays which will prove most attractive to the average reader.” - Summary by Maximilian Mügge, Translator

By: Arthur Hassall (1853-1930)

Book cover Making of the British Empire (A.D. 1714-1832)

At its height, the British Empire was the largest in history. This short volume traces its development through the long 18th century, from 1714 to the end of the Napoleonic Wars. Founded on the prosperity of Sir Robert Walpole's ministry , the Empire emerged from the Indian conquests of that gifted military amateur, Lord Clive, and was extended under the leadership of William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, who drove the English to victory in the Seven Years' War . Surmounting the loss of the American colonies and twenty years of conflict with France, by the first quarter of the 19th century, the British navy, master of the oceans, presided over an Empire upon which the sun never set.

By: Walter A. Wyckoff (1865-1908)

Book cover Workers - An Experiment in Reality: The West

A young scholar, recently graduated from Princeton College, travels across the United States as a member of the working class, taking any job he could find, enduring hardships and struggling to make a living. He travelled mainly on foot, designing for himself a social experiment on experiencing different class and culture structures and the reality of working conditions at the end of the 19th century. This volume continues the story that began in the first volume , and spans the region from Illinois to California - Summary by Phyllis Vincelli

By: Ida M. Tarbell (1857-1944)

Book cover Life of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 1

Volume 1 of Ida Tarbell's biography of Lincoln covers his life from his boyhood to his election to the presidency in 1860. Tarbell, in addition to her famous work in investigative journalism , was a noted Lincoln scholar. Her writings on Lincoln, originally published as articles in McClure's Magazine, were highly acclaimed. - Summary by Ciufi Galeazzi LIfe of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 2

By: Anonymous

Book cover St. Clair's Defeat 1791

St. Clair's defeat was a battle fought between the United States and the Western Confederacy of Native Americans on November 4, 1791, during the Northwest Indian War. Out of a US force of roughly 1000 men and officers, only 24 escaped unharmed. It has been cited as the most decisive defeat in the history of the American military and its largest defeat ever by Native Americans. This pamphlet is a compilation of three articles published in 1847, 1851 and 1864.

By: Thomas Davidson

Book cover Rousseau and Education According to Nature

In my Volume on Aristotle in this series, I tried to give an account of ancient, classical, and social Education; in the present volume I have endeavored to set forth the nature of modern, romantic, and unsocial Education. This education originates with Rousseau. With much reluctance I have been obliged to dwell, at considerable length, on the facts of his life, in order to show that his glittering structure rests, not upon any broad and firm foundation of well-generalized and well-sifted experience, but upon the private tastes and preferences of an exceptionally capricious and self-centered nature...

By: Paul Laurence Dunbar (1872-1906)

Book cover In Old Plantation Days

With this collection of short stories, Dunbar sought to draw on the success of his dialect poems by recreating and portraying the southern plantation during slavery. The stories focus on the stereotypical portrait of slaves as obedient workers happy to spend their lives in service of their benevolent owner. His attempt to find success was only partially realized, as his stories drew not only criticism but, in some cases, anger at their very stereotypical nature. The book itself, however, proved to be more lucrative than previous fiction works had been for the author.

By: Justus Ebert (1869-1946)

Book cover Trial of a New Society

In 1912 textile workers in Lawrence, Massachusetts, mostly immigrants, went on strike in response to a pay cut, speedups, and unsafe working conditions. Representatives from the Industrial Workers of the World came in to help organize the strike. The city declared martial law and a tense standoff went on for weeks. National newspapers provided breathless coverage of the strike and painted drastically different pictures of what was happening and who was to blame. When a woman was shot in ambiguous circumstances, strike leaders were tried for murder--not for shooting her, but for purportedly inciting mob violence leading to her death...

By: Horatio W. Dresser (1866-1954)

Book cover World’s Story Volume XV: The World War

This is the last volume of the 15-volume series The World’s Story, originally started by Eva March Tappan. This book, edited by Horatio W. Dresser deals exclusively with the time of the First World War, the events leading up to it, the battles and war engines, the political and diplomatic background endeavours and the cost - human and monetary - of this War. - Summary by Sonia

By: The Sisters of Notre Dame

Book cover Leading Events in the History of the Church: Part 1 - Christian Antiquity

The first volume in a series of Catholic Church history books written for children. Volume 1 covers the time period from after Our Lord's death till the 5th Century.

By: Various

Book cover Cambridge Modern History. Volume 03, The Wars of Religion

The Cambridge Modern History is a universal history covering the period from 1450 to 1910. It was published in 14 volumes between 1902 and 1912. The series was planned by Lord Acton, who intended it to be a monument of objective, collaborative scholarship, and edited by A.W. Ward, G. W. Prothero and Stanley Leathes. From the preface: "The present volume, as its title imports, relates a complicated series of conflicts of which the origin or the pretext has for the most part to be sought in the great religious schism with which the preceding volume was concerned...

By: Stanley Lane-Poole (1854-1931)

Book cover Story of Cairo

Although Cairo is most famous for the ancient Egyptian pyramids of Giza located at its outskirts, the city as we know it today dates back only to 969. Since then, numerous rulers of different Muslim dynasties built fortifications, mosques and other buildings that earned Cairo the name "city of a thousand minarets". In this book, Stanley Lane-Poole traces the history of Cairo from the early Muslim period to the British Invasion of 1882. While doing so, he gives vivid descriptions of many of the mediaeval buildings that shape Cairo's cityscape to this day. This book is part of the "Mediaeval Town" series published in the early 20th century. Proof listeners: SaraHale and MrsHand

By: Alexander Berkman (1870-1936)

Book cover Bolshevik Myth

The Bolshevik Myth is a book by Alexander Berkman who with his partner Emma Goldman was deported from the USA under the 1918 Anarchist Exclusion Act and shipped to the young Soviet Russia. He describes his experiences in Bolshevik Russia from 1920 to 1922, where he saw the aftermath of the Russian Revolution of 1917. Written in the form of a diary, The Bolshevik Myth describes how Berkman's initial enthusiasm for the revolution faded as he became disillusioned with the Bolsheviks and their suppression of all political dissent...

By: Homer Greene (1853-1940)

Book cover Lincoln Conscript

A heartwarming novel which visits the last two years of the American Civil War. The center of the story is the conflict of emotions and deeds between a father and son who hold opposing views of the conflict and the surprising role that President Lincoln plays in wishing to reconcile the two. A novel of both pathos and rejoicing. - Summary by KevinS

By: H. Rider Haggard (1856-1925)

Book cover Jess

The setting for this novel is the Boer War in South Africa in 1880. This novel is interesting and exciting on several levels: there are complicated love entanglements, evil Machiavellian treachery, political reflection having to do with the ethics of the colonialism of the day, for one subject for thought, and war in all its lurid and shocking and murderous detail.

By: John Gregory Bourke (1846-1896)

Book cover Apache Campaign In The Sierra Madre

An account of the expedition [of the U.S. Army] in pursuit of the hostile Chiricahua Apaches in the spring of 1883. Bourke was a Medal of Honor awardee in the American Civil War whose subsequent Army career included several campaigns in the Indian wars of the mid to late 19th century in the American West. He wrote prolifically. He was mostly free of the unfortunate disdain for Native Americans common in 19th century America. He was quite admiring of many aspects of the Native American. “… Bourke had the opportunity to witness every facet of life in the Old West—the battles, wildlife, the internal squabbling among the military, the Indian Agency, settlers, and Native Americans...

By: Helen S. Wright

Book cover Great White North

Sketches of those who braved the 'Great White North' in exploration and adventure. - Summary by KevinS

By: Dan DeQuille (1829-1898)

Book cover History of the Comstock Silver Lode and Mines

This is a brief account of the Comstock Lode silver mines, and description of the geographic features of the state of Nevada including the railroads. Silver not only defined Nevada, but influenced the opening of the American West as far as San Francisco. Dan De Quille wrote extensively on the history of mining in the area of Nevada, and published the larger work “The Big Bonanza” assisted by Mark Twain, both of whom were part of the Sagebrush School of writers. - Summary by Larry Wilson

By: Muriel O. Davis

Book cover Political History of France, 1789-1910

This little book opens on the eve of the French Revolution. The government is crippled by financial mismanagement, ruled by a King who, in the author's words, is "devoid of both ability and energy," and resented by a tax-oppressed peasantry and a rising middle class. The Revolution escapes the control of its instigators and France is plunged into the Terror and international war. Enter Napoleon, a man with "an enormous capacity for work," who can "get to the root of a matter and master technicalities with great swiftness," but whose "vulgar desire for recognition...

By: Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832)

Book cover Fortunes of Nigel

During the turbulent moment in English history involving King James 1 and 6, Nigel Olifaunt, a Scottish lord, seeks to protect his family home and holdings, but meets with recalcitrance and treachery, which eventually results in his imprisonment. But there are forces of good that help to set him free and right injustices.

By: Abigail Mott (1766-1851)

Book cover Narratives of Colored Americans

Abigail Mott was a Quaker and abolitionist from New York who, along with fellow Quaker M. S. Wood, has compiled a provocative collection of stories of “Colored Americans.” They range from well-known figures such as Phillis Wheatley and Sojourner Truth to the common men and women who give poignant insights of their life. Selections consist of short anecdotes, essays, stories, letters and poetry. Many have strong religious and spiritual themes. - Summary by Larry Wilson

By: Elizabeth O'Neill (1877-1951)

Book cover Story Of The World: A Simple History For Boys And Girls

Dedicatory Letter. Dear Doris, I could not tell you all the things which have ever happened in the world, but I have tried to tell you shortly about all the most important things from the very beginning, even before people had come into the World at all, right down to our own wonderful times. I have chosen the greatest men and women to tell you about, and in reading their stories I hope you will understand better something of what the times were like in which they lived, and what the other people too were like who were not so great and the kind of lives they led...

By: Edward Keble Chatterton (1878-1944)

Book cover Daring Deeds of Famous Pirates

Edward Chatterton, a prolific British author of maritime adventures, presents fascinating stories of pirates and their exploits from earliest times through the 19th century. Chapters include the history of piracy in Tudor and Elizabethan times and stories of legendary pirates such as Black Beard, Henry Morgan, and Captain Kidd. - Summary by Larry Wilson

By: Agnes Mary Frances Robinson (1857-1944)

Book cover Short History of France: From Caesar's Invasion to the Battle of Waterloo

After the Roman conquest, the Celtic Gauls adopted Roman culture and speech. The Germanic invasions ultimately transformed France into a Catholic feudal society. In this short history, Mary Duclaux traces the emergence of towns, the rise of the French monarchy, the calamitous Hundred Years' War and the Wars of Religion. We meet Joan of Arc, Charles VII, the gallant Henry IV, and the Sun King, Louis XIV, who drove France to the brink of bankruptcy. In the second half of the book Duclaux gives us the...

By: James Creelman (1859-1915)

Book cover Why We Love Lincoln

Brought to us by notable reporter and writer, James Creelman, this story of Abraham Lincoln is a more personal and simple portrait of the most popular U.S. President. This account is told in an easy flowing style giving many insights into the spirt and character of the man, making the story of Lincoln accessible both to young people and adults.

By: Sutton Griggs (1872-1933)

Book cover Imperium in Imperio: A Study of the Negro Race Problem

Imperium in Imperio is a historical fiction novel by Sutton Griggs, published in 1899. The novel covers the life of Belton Piedmont, an educated and disciplined black man in the Jim Crow south and his role in a shadow government of black men operated out of a college in Waco, Texas.

By: Ida M. Tarbell (1857-1944)

Book cover Life of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 2

Volume 2 of Ida Tarbell's biography of Lincoln begins at chapter 22 with Lincoln's first inauguration, and ends with an account of his funeral. The volume also includes a lengthy appendix which contains, in chronological order, letters. telegrams and speeches of Lincoln which had not been previously published. Tarbell, in addition to her famous work in investigative journalism , was a noted Lincoln scholar. Her writings on Lincoln, originally published as articles in McClure's Magazine, were highly acclaimed. - Summary by Ciufi Galeazzi LIfe of Abraham Lincoln, Volume 1

By: Winifred Stephens Whale (1870-1944)

Book cover Women of the French Revolution

One aspect of this subject of revolutionary women, their connection with the secret societies of the day I have purposely ignored. It is obscure and highly controversial. Unfortunately, though these societies have been much, written about, and especially of late, it has often been in a partisan spirit. This book will constantly deal with parties, but I trust not in the spirit of a partisan. Of the three methods of treating this subject, the strictly chronological method, the biographical, and a classification according to the play of ideas and the modes and fields of action, I have chosen the last...

By: Various

Book cover Myths and Legends Around the World - Collection 10

This collection is dedicated to recordings of short mythical or legendary works which are in the Public Domain. The stories tell of legends, heroes, myths, and ancient lore from many different cultures.

By: DuBose Heyward (1885-1940)

Book cover Porgy

Story about Southern African American man with disabilities and the life he leads in the 1900's. - Summary by Denise Ray

By: United States Senate

Book cover Examining the U.S. Capitol Attack

A joint bipartisan report by the U.S. Senate Committees on Homeland Security and Rules and Administration, addressing security, planning, and response by the U.S. Capitol Police, the Capitol Police Board, the FBI, and Departments of Homeland Security and Defense to the events of January 6, 2021, in and around the U.S. Capitol Building. - Summary by Joanne Turner

By: John Lothrop Motley (1814-1877)

Book cover Causes Of The American Civil War

John Lothrop Motley was an American author and popular diplomat, who helped to prevent European intervention on the side of the Confederates in the American Civil War. In 1861, just after the outbreak of the American Civil War, Motley wrote two letters to The Times defending the Federal position, and these letters, afterwards reprinted as [this] pamphlet entitled Causes of the Civil War in America, made a favourable impression on President Lincoln. Partly owing to this essay, Motley was appointed...

By: John Buchan (1875-1940)

Book cover Last Secrets

The author, John Buchan, maintains that "the main lines of the earth's architecture have been determined" during the first two decades of the twentieth century, and all that remains is but "amplifying our knowledge of the groyning and buttresses and stone-work." In this history of exploration, he tells of nine of those momentous final discoveries that placed the earth's last big secrets firmly on the map, from the mysterious "cloud city" of Lhasa, to the slopes--but not yet the summit--of Mount Everest. - Summary by Steven Seitel

By: François Norbert Blanchet (1795-1883)

Book cover Historical Sketches of the Catholic Church in Oregon, During the Past Forty Years

This book is a first-hand account of the experiences of Fr. Norbert Blanchet and his fellow missionaries to Oregon in the 1830’s and 1840’s. The original duo, Fr. Blanchet and Fr. Demers, had incredible adventures traveling across Canada by canoe, horseback, and river raft to arrive at the Hudson’s Bay Company Fort at Vancouver, Washington. From there, they energetically and joyfully established churches in the Willamette valley, along the Columbia River, and into present day Washington state and British Columbia...

By: Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881)

Book cover French Revolution: A History. Volume 1: The Bastille (Version 2)

Subtitled "The Bastille", Volume 1 of Thomas Carlyle's three volume "The French Revolution: A History" was first published in 1837, and covers the events of the French Revolution up to the forced move of Louis XVI from Versailles to Paris. While a modern listener not already familiar with the events described here may need some time to get their bearings amidst a sea of unfamiliar names and allusions, Carlyle's idiosyncratic yet justly famous present-tense, quasi-firsthand narrative quickly builds into a gripping, highly dramatic story which contemporary scholars still regard as being essentially accurate...

By: Ellen Key (1849-1926)

Book cover Woman Movement

Ellen Key's 'The Woman movement' follows the development of the feminist movement striving towards a greater emancipation of women in the public sphere and overcoming the traditional perception of gendered activities. The Swedish feminist and this work combined with many more, served as a base for a lot of the 20th century feminist movements.

By: James B. Gillett (1856-1937)

Book cover Six Years with the Texas Rangers, 1875 to 1881

James Gillet recounts his adventures with the Texas Rangers 1856-1937. In a very entertaining style he recounts personal stories of wars, feuds, battles with the Apache nation and pursuing robbers and murderers. From these stories, and others like them, arose the many legends of courage and daring among the Texas Rangers. “The Texas Rangers, as an organization, dates from the spring of 1836. When the Alamo had fallen before the onslaught of the Mexican troops and the frightful massacre had occurred, General Sam Houston organized among the Texan settlers in the territory a troop of 1600 mounted riflemen...

By: Elizabeth Blackwell (1821-1910)

Book cover Pioneer Work in Opening the Medical Profession to Women

A fascinating account of the first woman to receive a medical degree in the United States. She writes of her struggles in being accepted to a medical school . She details her experiences while in the process of obtaining her degree, and her work both with patients and administratively, helping to found medical schools and hospitals for women. Summary by Phyllis Vincelli

By: Oscar Browning (1837-1923)

Book cover Modern England 1820-1885

This short survey opens with the accession of that portly spendthrift, King George IV. With British support, Greece becomes independent. The Irish, under O'Connell, carry agitation to the point of rebellion, forcing Parliament to pass the Catholic Emancipation Act. After a painful labor of over a year, the First Reform Bill is enacted in 1832. Queen Victoria comes to the throne in 1837. Faced with an Irish famine, Sir Robert Peel, repeals the Corn Laws. There is a Great Exhibition, a war in the Crimea, and a rebellion in India. Gladstone and Disraeli battle on the floor of the House of Commons, while British imperialism advances in South Africa and in Egypt. - Summary by Pamela Nagami

By: Edward Crompton Butler

Book cover Our Little Mexican Cousin

This book tells about life in Mexico in the early 20th century, through the eyes of a little girl, Juanita. As the story follows her, the reader learns about cultural practices, historical events, and famous landmarks.

By: Edward Carpenter (1844-1929)

Book cover Civilisation: Its Cause and Cure, and Other Essays

This publication, by English utopian socialist Edward Carpenter, describes civilisation as a sort of disease with which humanity is afflicted. Alongside this influential publication , are compiled other essays: Modern Science: A Criticism; The Science of the Future: A Forecast; Defence of Criminals: A Criticism of Morality; Exfoliation: Lamarck versus Darwin; Custom; A Rational and Humane Science; and The New Morality, plus Appendices . - Summary by Jake Malizia

By: Alexander Baltzly

Book cover Is War Diminishing?

A study In the prevalence of war in Europe from 1400 to the present day. This small book summarises historical periods of peace compared to periods of war, as concluded by consultation with other historians, and seeks to answer the question as to if the incidence and duration of periods of national conflict were becoming more intense or not, and how the periods of war may correlate to other social trends. - Summary by Leon Harvey

By: Thomas Conant (1842-1905)

Book cover Upper Canada Sketches

This book relates "somewhat random sketches of life in the early settlements and country districts of Upper Canada" , as well as a bit of history of the Conant family from its beginnings in England, to their emigration to what was to become Oshawa, Ontario in 1792. This book is especially interesting to the reader since it speaks a lot of the area near which she resides. - Summary by TriciaGThe Gutenberg text has the pictures referenced in the text. They're a treat to look at.

By: American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society

Book cover Two American Slavery Documents

This recording contains two original documents. 1) Life of James Mars, a Slave Born and Sold in Connecticut, by James Mars . James Mars was born in Connecticut in 1790 and spent the better part of his youth a slave working for various owners—once fleeing to the woods with his family to avoid being relocated to the South. At age twenty-five he became a free man and moved to Hartford, Connecticut, where he became a leader in the local African American community. His memoir is one of the more famous accounts of slave life in early New England...

By: Arthur Young (1741-1820)

Book cover Travels in France During the Years 1787, 1788, 1789

Arthur Young, an English agriculturist, set out to write a travelogue on the state of agriculture in France and found himself in the midst of the French Revolution. His report on life in the capital and in the countryside in the years 1787, 1788, and 1789, replete with droll traveler's mishaps, becomes an eyewitness account of a society on the brink of catastrophe. From the court scene at Versailles to backroads villages comes this astonishing record of unfolding events, conspiracy theories about the queen, jubilation, and mass hysteria.

By: Various

Book cover Myths and Legends Around the World - Collection 11

This collection is dedicated to recordings of short mythical or legendary works which are in the Public Domain. The stories tell of legends, heroes, myths, and ancient lore from many different cultures.

By: Alfredo d'Escragnolle Taunay (1843-1899)

Book cover Innocencia: a story of the prairie regions of Brazil

The story of Innocencia, an 18-year-old girl who lives in the prairies of Brazil, is a twist on the traditional love triangle. The plot has been compared to the more famous "Paul and Virginie" and "Romeo and Juliet", but it takes place on the dropback of the loneliness of the sparsely populated backregions in 19th century Brazil, visited by a German naturalist in search of new species of insects, Dr. Meyer, who unsuspectedly finds himself caught in a complicated maze of jealousy, love and distrust. Inocencia was the first book by a Brazilian writer to be translated into English, as the translator states in his preface. - Summary by Leni

By: Thomas Beames (1815-1864)

Book cover Rookeries of London

Rev. Thomas Beames was a preacher at St. James, Westminster in London. He compiled his own eye-witness accounts of the most notorious of the slum areas, the Rookeries. In this essay, he passionately discusses the effects of poverty and the mistreatment of the poor and working classes. Much of what he says is still valid today; for example, in discussing over-population and emigration, he mentions the mis-use of land in Britain: "... large tracts of land, such as in Derbyshire, seem only valuable as grouse preserves...

By: Gustavus Cheyney Doane (1840-1892)

Book cover Yellowstone Expedition of 1870

Lt. Gustavus Doane was a member of the 1870 Yellowstone Expedition led by Henry Washburn. Washburn requested military support from General Hancock of the US Army who selected Doane to lead a detail of five soldiers from Fort Ellis in Montana to accompany the expedition. This is Doane's journal submitted by the War Department to the US Senate reporting on the observations of the expedition. The record kept by Doane is recognized as a significant contribution to the subsequent creation of Yellowstone National Park. - Summary by Fritz

By: Mary A. Hollings (1869-1926)

Book cover Europe in Renaissance and Reformation 1453-1660

In a small space the Oxford-educated historian, Mary Hollings, provides a panoramic view of a tumultuous age. We meet Cesare Borgia and Savonarola, the universal spider, Louis XI, Henry IV, France's best-beloved king, Sweden’s wise and courageous Queen Christina, and great generals, like Albrecht von Wallenstein and Gustavus Adolphus. The twin ideals of imperial unity and of one true church led to two centuries of unremitting warfare from the fertile plains of Italy, through the alpine passes, across France, the Netherlands, the German states, to Poland and Bohemia...

By: Various

Book cover Myths and Legends Around the World - Collection 12

This collection is dedicated to recordings of short mythical or legendary works which are in the Public Domain. The stories tell of legends, heroes, myths, and ancient lore from many different cultures.

By: Stephen D. Peet (1831-1914)

Book cover Ashtabula Disaster

Rev. Stephen D Peet describes the fatal railroad disaster on December 29, 1876 in Ashtabula, Ohio due to a bridge failure. He was a resident of the town and at the scene on the night of the disaster. This book is based upon his work at the crash site, interviews with survivors, information from the press and the coroner's jury, His intent is not to describe the disaster but rather to focus on "the religious lessons of the occasion" and to provide the reader with "comfort from a view of the lovely characters and the Christian hopes which span this dark cloud with a bow of promise". - Summary by mleigh

By: Alexander Hamilton (1755/1757-1804)

Book cover Federalist Papers (version 2)

“The Federalist Papers” are a collection of 85 linked essays that explain the construction of the U.S. government and why it was built that way. The Papers are regarded as the best pipeline into understanding the U.S. Constitution and the founding principles of the government it would establish. I have endeavored here to present these essays, not as articles in a newspaper, but as you might have experienced them if you had sat in a comfortable tavern with a tankard in hand, and listened while these ardent men ranged in front of a friendly fireplace as they attempted to convince you of their arguments...

By: Mary Raymond Shipman Andrews (1860-1936)

Book cover Yellow Butterflies

The title of this historical fiction could as well have been "A Soldier’s Mother" or “An Unknown Soldier”. There are indeed butterflies, and there is a small boy who grows into a fine, strapping young man who goes to war. But this moving novella centers squarely on the young man's mother, her love for him and her abiding faith.

By: Frederick Herman Tilberg (1895-1979)

Book cover Antietam National Battlefield, Maryland

The American Civil War battle at Antietam, Maryland, on 17 September 1862, has been called the bloodiest day of that conflict. Confederate General Lee’s invasion of the North was repulsed, and when the fighting ended, the course of the Civil War had been greatly altered. This victory by the North moved President Abraham Lincoln to issue The Emancipation Proclamation, freeing all slaves in states then in rebellion against the Union. This 1960 publication is number 31 in the Historical Handbook series put out by the U...

By: John M. Douglass

Book cover Indians in Wisconsin's History

Pre-European arrival history of Wisconsin's Native American tribes, with discussions of their way of life, crafts, clothing, shelter, hunting, fishing and farming. Their activity and battles during French, British and U.S. rule of the territory. Extermination and forced removal of tribes to agencies and reservations. Numbers of survivors from original tribes and plight of those remaining in the 20th century. Popular Science Handbook No. 6, published by the Milwaukee Public Museum in 1954. Summary by Verla Viera

By: Frederick Herman Tilberg (1895-1979)

Book cover Gettysburg National Military Park, Pennsylvania

On the gently rolling farm lands surrounding the little town of Gettysburg, Pa., was fought one of the great decisive battles of American history. For 3 days, from July 1 to 3, 1863, a gigantic struggle between 75,000 Confederates and 88,000 Union troops raged about the town and left 51,000 casualties in its wake. Heroic deeds were numerous on both sides, climaxed by the famed Confederate assault on July 3 which has become known throughout the world as Pickett’s Charge. The Union victory gained on these fields ended the last Confederate invasion of the North and marked the beginning of a gradual decline in Southern military power...

By: John Henry Ingram (1842-1916)

Book cover Haunted Homes and Family Traditions of Great Britain

Possibly no part in the world is more connected in our minds to hauntings, ghost sightings and gruesome legends than Great Britain with its numerous castles, old manors, shady streets and remote country abodes. Who hasn't yet thought of maybe one day visiting one of those places, only to feel for themselves the thrill of the creepy atmosphere in their rooms and dungeons, enhanced by the chilling stories surrounding them? In this compilation, John Henry Ingram is offering the reader some 150 such places, gathering interesting, sometimes horrifying or even supernatural facts about the history and legends of these parts of Great Britain. - Summary by Sonia

By: William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925)

Book cover World’s Famous Orations, Vol. VII: Continental Europe

This book contains a number of famous speeches and addresses from continental Europe between 300 CE to 1900 CE, organized around the following themes: Early Christianity, The Reformation, Modern France, Italy, Modern Germany, Hungary and Spain. - Summary by Chris Badenoch

By: William A. Sinclair (1858-1912)

Book cover Aftermath of Slavery

This work describes conditions and forces the black population of the South faced after freedom was brought by the Civil War. As Sinclair puts it at the outset of his book, ". . . the chief efforts of Southern leadership have been to curtail the freedom of the colored people, to minimize their liberty and reduce them as nearly as possible to the condition of chattel slaves." - Summary by Jim Locke

By: Nicholas Canzona (1925-1985)

Book cover U. S. Marine Operations in Korea 1950-1953, Volume 1: The Pusan Perimeter

It meant little to most Americans on 25 June 1950 to read in their Sunday newspapers that civil strife had broken out in Korea. They could hardly have suspected that this remote Asiatic peninsula was to become the scene of the fourth most costly military effort of American history, both in blood and money, before the end of the year. With a reputation built largely on amphibious warfare, Marines of the 1st Brigade were called upon to prove their versatility in sustained ground action. On three separate occasions within the embattled Perimeter—south toward Sachon and twice along the Naktong River—these Marine units hurled the weight of their assault force at the enemy...

By: Arthur Henry Johnson (1845-1927)

Book cover Normans in Europe

This short history of the Normans in Europe opens with the invasions of the Vikings, who came from Scandinavian villages among rugged rocks and deep fiords. Johnson recounts how their myths of strife and woe, of the frost giants and of the crafty Loki, expressed their twin ideals of resourcefulness and war. These restless bands ravaged England, Germany, and France, penetrating the continents in their shallow-draft, half-decked ships. He writes that wherever they went they showed "themselves great warriors, founders, organizers, and administrators...

By: Various

Book cover Myths and Legends Around the World - Collection 13

This collection is dedicated to recordings of short mythical or legendary works which are in the Public Domain. The stories tell of legends, heroes, myths, and ancient lore from many different cultures.

By: Rudolf Lothar (1865-1943)

Book cover Golem: A legend of old Prague

Rabbi Loeb creates a clay man to house a perfect soul that he hopes will not be blighted by human prejudices. The plan does not go as he hoped... This is one of many stories about the golem, all of which involve Rabbi Loeb , a 16th-century talmudic scholar known as The Maharal. Rodolf Lother was an Austrian writer. This story was published in the B'nai Brith journal The Menorah in 1896 and subsequently included in the author's German language book Der Golem: Phantasien und Historien . - Summary by Adrian Praetzellis

By: The Gawain Poet

Book cover Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (Weston Translation Version 2)

This poem celebrates Christmas by exploring the mystery of Christ's mission on earth: his death, resurrection, and second coming as judge of all human souls. Sir Gawain is cast in the role of Everyman. At the feast of the New Year, an unarmed green giant rides his green horse into the banqueting hall of King Arthur and challenges any member of the assembled company to behead him with a huge axe and then to submit to the same treatment from his victim the next year. Gawain volunteers to prevent Arthur from accepting this challenge, fairly confident that the challenger will be unfit to return the blow...

By: Pierre Beaumarchais (1732-1799)

Book cover Barber of Seville

Count Almaviva's heart is stolen when he lays eyes on Rosine, but he worries that she will only love him for his money. Can Figaro help him? This comedy is the first play in Beaumarchais' Figaro trilogy. It was written in 1773, but because of political and legal problems, Beaumarchais could not stage the play until 1775. The Barber of Seville was adapted into at least five operas, the best-known being by Rossini. The other plays in the trilogy are The Follies of a Day: or the Marriage of Figaro and The Guilty Mother...


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