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By: David Hume (1711-1776)

Book cover History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution of 1688, Volume 1C

David Hume is one of the great philosophers of the Western intellectual tradition. His philosophical writings earned him lasting fame and renown; his historical writing earned his bread and butter. His "The History of England from the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution of 1688", published between 1754 and 1764, was immensely popular and Hume wrote that "the copy-money given me by the booksellers much exceeded any thing formerly known in England; I was become not only independent, but opulent...

By: David Marshall Brooks (1902-1994)

The Necessity of Atheism by David Marshall Brooks The Necessity of Atheism

Plain speaking is necessary in any discussion of religion, for if the freethinker attacks the religious dogmas with hesitation, the orthodox believer assumes that it is with regret that the freethinker would remove the crutch that supports the orthodox. And all religious beliefs are "crutches" hindering the free locomotive efforts of an advancing humanity. There are no problems related to human progress and happiness in this age which any theology can solve, and which the teachings of freethought cannot do better and without the aid of encumbrances.

By: David Nunes Carvalho (1848-1925)

Book cover Forty Centuries of Inkor, a chronological narrative concerning ink and its backgrounds

By: David Starr Jordan (1851-1931)

Book cover Life's Enthusiasms

The words in this essay on positive thought sing like those in Whitman's "Leaves of Grass." The author praises joyous living and recommends certain routes to its attainment. He explores schooling (public secondary and the university), travel, and the study of nature as ways to stay buoyant during life's trials. He also praises the power of the arts (literature, music, painting, sculpture) to keep spirits soaring.

By: David Walker (1796-1830)

Book cover Walker's Appeal

The Appeal grabbed readers’ attention in as dramatic a manner as Walker could have possibly imagined. In her book, Maria W. Stewart and the Roots of Black Political Thought, Kirsten Waters writes about how the pamphlet itself was viewed as dangerous by pro-slavery forces, while Walker actively worked to get his text in the hands of Black readers. He did not direct his writing to White audiences, and in the third edition added a special message to Black readers, saying that: It is expected that...

By: Delmer Eugene Croft

Supreme Personality by Delmer Eugene Croft Supreme Personality

Life is self-realization. Every birth is divine. We are born anew every morning. My wish is that you may catch the gleam, be freed from limitations and enter upon your boundless possibilities. To bring you into the throne-room of your being, that you may awaken in self-realization, is why I have prepared this course of lessons. Should you give five minutes a day to them, in a year you will know the joy there is in Life, in Power, and in Service. (from the text)

By: Derek J. de Solla (Derek John de Solla) Price (1922-1983)

On the Origin of Clockwork, Perpetual Motion Devices, and the Compass by Derek J. de Solla (Derek John de Solla) Price On the Origin of Clockwork, Perpetual Motion Devices, and the Compass

By: Desiderius Erasmus (1466/69-1536)

The Praise of Folly by Desiderius Erasmus The Praise of Folly

The Praise of Folly (Greek title: Morias Enkomion (Μωρίας Εγκώμιον), Latin: Stultitiae Laus, sometimes translated as In Praise of Folly, Dutch title: Lof der Zotheid) is a satirical essay written in 1509 by Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam (1466/69-1536). It is considered one of the most influential works of literature in Western civilization and one of the catalysts of the Protestant Reformation.It starts off with a satirical learned encomium after the manner of the Greek satirist...

Book cover The Education of Children

By: Digital Equipment Corporation

Book cover Preliminary Specifications: Programmed Data Processor Model Three (PDP-3) October, 1960

By: Dillon Wallace (1863-1939)

The Lure of the Labrador Wild by Dillon Wallace The Lure of the Labrador Wild

The Lure Of The Labrador Wild is a account of a expedition by Leonidas Hubbard, an adventurer and journalist to canoe the system Naskaupi River - Lake Michikamau in Labrador and George River in Quebec. His companions on this journey were his friend, New York lawyer Dillon Wallace and an Indian guide from Missannabie, George Elson. From the start, the expedition was beset with mistakes and problems. Instead of ascending the Naskaupi River, by mistake they followed the shallow Susan Brook. After hard long portaging and almost reaching Lake Michikamau, with food supplies running out, on September 15 at Windbound lake, they decided to turn back...

By: Dion Clayton Calthrop (1878-1937)

English Costume by Dion Clayton Calthrop English Costume

The world, if we choose to see it so, is a complicated picture of people dressing and undressing. The history of the world is composed of the chat of a little band of tailors seated cross-legged on their boards; they gossip across the centuries, feeling, as they should, very busy and important. As you will see, I have devoted myself entirely to civil costume—that is, the clothes a man or a woman would wear from choice, and not by reason of an appointment to some ecclesiastical post, or to a military calling, or to the Bar, or the Bench. Such clothes are but symbols of their trades and professions, and have been dealt with by persons who specialize in those professions.

By: Doane Robinson (1856-1946)

Book cover Sioux Indian Courts An address delivered by Doane Robinson before the South Dakota Bar Association, at Pierre, South Dakota, January 21, 1909

By: Don C. (Don Carlos) Seitz (1862-1935)

Book cover The Tryal of William Penn and William Mead for Causing a Tumult at the Sessions Held at the Old Bailey in London the 1st, 3d, 4th, and 5th of September 1670

By: Donald Alexander Mackenzie (1873-1936)

Book cover Myths and Legends: Myths of Babylonia and Assyria

Donald Alexander Mackenzie was a Scottish journalist and prolific writer on religion, mythology and anthropology in the early 20th century. His works included Indian Myth and Legend, Celtic Folklore and Myths of China and Japan.As well as writing books, articles and poems, he often gave lectures, and also broadcast talks on Celtic mythology.This volume deals with the myths and legends of Babylonia and Assyria, and as these reflect the civilization in which they developed, a historical narrative has been provided, beginning with the early Sumerian Age and concluding with the periods of the Persian and Grecian Empires...

By: Donald Ogden Stewart

Perfect Behavior by Donald Ogden Stewart Perfect Behavior

A humorous guide to manners and etiquette for ladies and gentlemen in a social "crises," published in 1922. (Introduction by Samanem)

By: Dora C. C. L. (Dora Cathrine Cristine Liebel) Roper (1873-)

Book cover Food for the Traveler What to Eat and Why

By: Doris Stevens (1892-1963)

Jailed for Freedom by Doris Stevens Jailed for Freedom

A first-hand account of the 1913-1919 campaign of American suffragists, detailing their treatment at the hands of the courts, and the true conditions of their incarceration.

By: Dorothy Canfield Fisher (1879-1958)

Book cover Home-Maker

The Knapp family seems as though they ought to be happy, yet hidden frustrations are tearing them apart under the surface. As the family breadwinner, Lester Knapp drags himself reluctantly to his job each day, miserable in the harsh world of commerce and business, longing for a quiet life at home with his books. Meanwhile, Evangeline Knapp is admired as an excellent housewife, yet the limited challenges of that life are driving her to perfectionism and boredom. The Knapp children are affected by their parents' unhappiness, the youngest child acting out in frequent tantrums, and the two older children tense and nervous...

By: Dorothy Osborne (1627-1695)

Love Letters of Dorothy Osborne by Dorothy Osborne Love Letters of Dorothy Osborne

A lively, interesting and important collection of 17th century love-letters written by an English lady, against the background of the Civil War and the Restoration

By: Dorothy Quigley

What Dress Makes of Us by Dorothy Quigley What Dress Makes of Us

A wickedly funny book of advice on women’s dress. However old, fat or plain you are, Dorothy Quigley will tell you what not to wear.

By: Dr. Benjamin Rush (1746-1813)

Book cover Inquiry into the Effects of Ardent Spirits upon the Human Body and Mind, with an Account of the Means of Preventing, and of the Remedies for Curing Them

Written when the United States extended only to the Mississippi River, by one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, this short work explores the physical, social, and mental effects of distilled liquors; the classes of people prone to intoxication by them; suggested drinks to use instead of them; and remedies for intoxication and for their habitual use. He takes a medical view of alcoholism, exploring the physical causes rather than blaming moral failure as the cause. Alcoholic drinks that are not distilled are viewed as wholesome drinks, and opium is suggested for pain as being without bad effects or addictive qualities.

By: Dreiser, Theodore (1871-1945)

Hollywood: Its Morals and Manners by Dreiser, Theodore Hollywood: Its Morals and Manners

Serialized in Shadowland from November 1921 to February 1922, Hollywood: Its Morals and Manners is Theodore Dreiser's shocking four part expose on the motion picture industry. In it, he shares his observations from his extended stay in Los Angeles, and gives us an intimate look at the seedier underside of Hollywood.

By: Dudley Landon Vaill (1873-?)

The County Regiment by Dudley Landon Vaill The County Regiment

A sketch of the second regiment of Connecticut volunteer heavy artillery, originally the Nineteenth Volunteer Infantry, in the Civil War.

By: Duncan McGregor (1787-1881)

Book cover The Loss of the Kent, East Indiaman, in the Bay of Biscay Narrated in a Letter to a Friend

By: E. Gordon Browne (1871-1926)

Queen Victoria by E. Gordon Browne Queen Victoria

This book is about the life of Queen Victoria (1819 to 1901). All nine of her children married into the royal houses of Europe. She became the longest reigning monarch and more. This book is a fascinating read about the woman behind the British Empire.

By: E. Luscomb Haskell

Book cover Life of Jesse Harding Pomeroy

"The Life of Jesse Harding Pomeroy: The Most Remarkable Case in the History of Crime or Criminal Law" by E. Luscomb Haskell was published in Boston, Massachusetts in 1892 by the Harvard Law School Library, and is part of "The Making of the Modern Law, Legal Treatises, 1800-1926" series. Remarkable insight into the life of Pomeroy prior to, during, and following the crimes for which he was sentenced to life imprisonment at the tender age of 14, this is an excellent complement to Pomeroy's "autobiography" which was published immediately following his trial in 1874...

By: E. M. Delafield (1890-1943)

Book cover Heel of Achilles

After a difficult childhood, Lydia Raymond, a lower middle class girl, decides to explore her own individuality and climbs the social ladder. Yet, like everything in life, this has a price. This book tells about her childhood, her quest to find herself, and her relationship with her daughter, Jane. This is a fairytale turned upside down. - Summary by Stav Nisser.

By: E. R. Billings

Book cover Tobacco; Its History, Varieties, Culture, Manufacture and Commerce

By: Earl W. Phelan (1900-1993)

Book cover Radioisotopes in Medicine

Radioisotopes in Medicine is an educational booklet published in 1966 as part of the Understanding the Atom series by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Written in clear language for the general public, the booklet covers the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioactive isotopes like technetium 99m and iodine 131.

By: Eatmor Cranberries

Recipes for Eatmor Fresh Cranberries by Eatmor Cranberries Recipes for Eatmor Fresh Cranberries

By: Eaton G. Osman (1853-1929)

Starved Rock: A Historical Sketch by Eaton G. Osman Starved Rock: A Historical Sketch

This book is an early history of the Starved Rock Area in Northern Illinois. In the pre-Columbian era, the Starved Rock area was home to Native Americans, particularly the Kaskaskia who lived in the Grand Village of the Illinois across the river. Louis Jolliet and Jacques Marquette were the first Europeans recorded as exploring the region, and by 1683, the French had established Fort St. Louis on a large sandstone butte overlooking the river. According to a native legend, a group of Illinois Confederation (Illini) pursued by the Ottawa and Potawatomi fled to the butte in the late 18th century...

By: Eben E. (Eben Eugene) Rexford (1848-1916)

Book cover Amateur Gardencraft A Book for the Home-Maker and Garden Lover

By: Eben Eugene Rexford (1848-1916)

Book cover ABC of Vegetable Gardening

This how-to book includes chapters on getting ready, mapping the garden, planting, seeds, early work, house plants, fruits, hot beds and cold frames, and small gardens. There is even a chapter "expressly for women."

By: Eddie Rickenbacker (1890-1973)

Fighting the Flying Circus by Eddie Rickenbacker Fighting the Flying Circus

This is the WWI memoirs of Medal of Honor winner, Capt Eddie Rickenbacker. He fought in and eventually became commander of the 94th "Hat-in-the-Ring" Squadron, which ended the war with the highest number of air victories of any American squadron. The circus mentioned in the title refers to the German squadron commanded by the famous Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen. (Introduction by Brett W. Downey)

By: Edgar Thurston (1855-1935)

Omens and Superstitions of Southern India by Edgar Thurston Omens and Superstitions of Southern India

This book deals mainly with some aspects of what may be termed the psychical life of the inhabitants of the Madras Presidency, and the Native States of Travancore and Cochin.

By: Edgcumbe Staley (1845-1903)

Book cover dogaressas of Venice: The wives of the doges

A series of biographies of the wives of the doges of the Venetian Republic. - Summary by Timothy

By: Edith Birkhead (1889-1951)

Book cover Tale of Terror: A Study of the Gothic Romance

A seminal essay on the development of horror as a genre, highly influential on later writers.

By: Edith E. Wiggin

Lessons on Manners for Home and School Use by Edith E. Wiggin Lessons on Manners for Home and School Use

It is true that good manners, like good morals, are best taught by the teacher's example. It is also true that definite lessons, in which the subject can be considered in its appropriate divisions, are of no little value if we would have our children attain to "that finest of the fine arts, a beautiful behavior." (From the author's Introduction)

By: Edith Nesbit (1858-1924)

Railway Children by Edith Nesbit Railway Children

A thrilling spy story, a children's adventure, a charming portrait of early twentieth century life in London and the countryside and a heart warming family tale are all combined in this classic of children's literature The Railway Children by E Nesbit. The book has remained on the list of the best-loved children's books ever since it was first published as a serial story in The London Magazine in 1905. Later, it was published in book form and won acclaim from critics and readers across the world for its wonderful elements of character and plot...

Royal Children of English History by Edith Nesbit Royal Children of English History

From the first chapter: “History is a story, a story of things that happened to real live people in our England years ago; and the things that are happening here and now, and that are put in the newspapers, will be history for little children one of these days. And the people you read about in history were real live people, who were good and bad, and glad and sorry, just as people are now-a-days.” E. Nesbit writes about some of the people behind the names, dates and battles of English History in this lovely book for older children. The original book contains some beautiful illustrations and you can see those by clicking the ‘Gutenberg’ link below.

Book cover My School Days

A short memoir about the author's school days, serialised in The Girl's Own Paper from October 1896 to September 1897. It includes stories about teachers, fellow pupils, the things that scared her most as a child (and even as an adult) and a vivid account of the best summer of her childhood.Summary by Cori Samuel.

Book cover Wings and the Child

"When this book first came to my mind it came as a history and theory of the building of Magic Cities on tables, with bricks and toys and little things such as a child may find and use. But as I kept the thought by me it grew and changed, as thoughts will do, until at last it took shape as an attempt to contribute something, however small and unworthy, to the science of building a magic city in the soul of a child, a city built of all things pure and fine and beautiful." -- E. Nesbit"This lovely book describes the practicalities of building cities (or forts, secret bases and fairytale palaces) out of household odds-and-ends...

By: Edith Thomas (1882-)

Book cover Mary at the Farm and Book of Recipes Compiled during Her Visit among the "Pennsylvania Germans"

By: Edith Wharton (1862-1937)

Fighting France, from Dunkerque to Belfort by Edith Wharton Fighting France, from Dunkerque to Belfort

American novelist Edith Wharton was living in Paris when World War I broke out in 1914. She obtained permission to visit sites behind the lines, including hospitals, ravaged villages, and trenches. Fighting France records her travels along the front in 1914 and 1915, and celebrates the indomitable spirit of the French people.

By: editor: Frank Munsey

Book cover The Scrap Book Sampler

18 works -- two non-fic articles & one short fiction or poetry each -- from issues March, April, May, June, July, & August 1906 of The Scrap Book, Volume 1, edited by Frank Munsey. As he states in the editorial of the April 1906 issue (Vol 1, Iss 2) this was a sort of supplement to the editor's popular monthly, Munsey's Magazine. The Scrap Book is very like an American version of Punch with many short, often humorous articles interspersed with at least one short story, some poetry, and several longer non-fic pieces. The Scrap Book ran up to 1922.

By: Edmond Halley (1656-1742)

Book cover Miscellanea Curiosa, Vol 1

"The Royal Society is a Fellowship of many of the world's most eminent scientists and is the oldest scientific academy in continuous existence." . As scientists have explored the world around them, observed and tried to explain natural phenomena, they have been invited to present papers to the Royal Society. Edmond Halley was an eminent member of the society and gathered together some of the most interesting papers of his day. Today, we may see errors in the logic or calculations, based on current knowledge, but these papers are unedited and as presented at the time and show how scientific knowledge was expanding in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries...

By: Edmond Holmes (1850-1936)

Book cover What Is and What Might Be A Study of Education in General and Elementary Education in Particular

By: Edmund Beckett Grimthorpe (1816-1905)

Book cover A Rudimentary Treatise on Clocks, Watches and Bells

By: Edmund G. (Edmund Gibson) Ross (1826-1907)

Book cover History of the Impeachment of Andrew Johnson

By: Edmund Gosse (1849-1928)

Father and Son by Edmund Gosse Father and Son

Father and Son (1907) is a memoir by poet and critic Edmund Gosse, which he subtitled “a study of two temperaments.” The book describes Edmund’s early years in an exceptionally devout Plymouth Brethren home. His mother, who dies early and painfully of breast cancer, is a writer of Christian tracts. His father, Philip Henry Gosse, is an influential, though largely self-taught, invertebrate zoologist and student of marine biology who, after his wife’s death, takes Edmund to live in Devon...

Book cover Gossip in a Library

A collection of informal essays about books in his library. He combines commentary, translations, and humorous asides about authors and their subjects.

By: Edna Adelaide Brown (1875-1944)

Book cover Silver Bear

This is the first Lucy and Dora story. A charming story about Lucy and Dora, two little girls in a New England town. They are not really sisters, but soon everyone forgot that fact. The Silver Bear is a necklace, treasured by the girls.

Book cover Chinese Kitten

Lucy and Dora are so excited to learn they will be sleeping in a tent at the beach! Then Mother and Uncle Dan tell them that their kitten, Timmy is not invited, and Father says he might even run away. Arrangements must be made for Timmy... but will he agree to their plans? This charming story follows two sisters over the course of about a year and the things that they do with their family. The Chinese kitten is a part of an old chess set that the girls get from their aunt because one of the girls lost her necklace during a camping trip. Lots of working on needle point, washing dishes, going to school, and different holidays and what they do during them.

By: Edna Brush Perkins (1880-1930)

The White Heart of Mojave by Edna Brush Perkins The White Heart of Mojave

"The White Heart of the Mojave" recounts a 1920's adventure "in the wind and sun and big spaces" of Death Valley by two independent minded women, Edna Brush Perkins and Charlotte Hannahs Jordan. Both women were early feminists, Edna as chairwoman of the greater Cleveland Woman's Suffrage Party (1916-18). At the end of the Great War, the two friends wanted nothing more than to escape "to the solitariness of some wild and lonely place far from city halls, smokestacks, national organizations, and streets of little houses all alike...

By: Edna Ferber (1885-1968)

Book cover So Big

The story of Selina DeJong and her son Dirk, whom she affectionately calls So Big. After the death of her husband, Selina raises So Big on her own while managing her deceased husband's farm in Illinois. When So Big grows up, he moves to Chicago, where he finds himself drawn to the fast-money stock-broker lifestyle of the 1920s. So Big is conflicted: he wants to live in the world of speculation and finance, but he's aware that his mother are disappointed that he hasn't lived up to the hard-working, hardscrabble values instilled by his mother. - Summary by Alexandra Atiya

By: Edna W. Underwood (1873-1961)

Book cover Letters from a Prairie Garden

The "Letters from a Prairie Garden," are genuine letters and not fiction. They went through the mail. An explanatory word about their origin may not be amiss. Some years ago a famous artist came to a certain mid-western city on business connected with his profession. He had an acquaintance who lived in the hotel where the writer lived at that time and with whom he talked over the phone. The writer frequently happened to be talking at the same time, and the wires crossing, he heard me laugh repeatedly, and he nicknamed me "the woman who laughs...

By: Edward Allen Bell

Book cover A History of Giggleswick School From its Foundation, 1499 to 1912

By: Edward Anthony (1895-1971)

Book cover Pussycat Princess

This pussycat is out to have some adventurous fun in this enjoyable fairy tale for boys, girls and parents. Summary by Lynda Marie Neilson

By: Edward Axtell

Book cover The Boston Terrier and All About It A Practical, Scientific, and Up to Date Guide to the Breeding of the American Dog

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