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By: Louise Imogen Guiney (1861-1920)

Book cover White Sail

This is a collection of poems by Louise Imogen Guiney. The collection is split into four parts. After the titular poem, which is its own part, this volume contains ten narrative poems concerning some well-known and some lesser known legends. The third part of the volume is one of lyrics, and the fourth contains a number of sonnets. - Summary by Carolin

Book cover Roadside Harp

This is a collection of poems by Louise Imogen Guiney. - Summary by Carolin

By: Lucy Larcom (1824-1893)

Book cover Easter Gleams

This is a collection of Easter poems by Lucy Larcom. The poems cover the entire circle of religious holidays, customs, and bible verses around Easter. - Summary by Carolin

By: Lucy Maud Montgomery (1874-1942)

Book cover Watchman and Other Poems

While L. M. Montgomery is better known for her novels, such as Anne of Green Gables and Emily of New Moon, she also wrote hundreds of poems. Her love of beauty, nature, and the sea is evident in this, the only volume of her poetry published during her lifetime.

Book cover Winter Day

Montgomery's poem on winter is an analogy for life, symbolizing the three life stages of youth, adulthood and old age.

Book cover Harbour Dawn

Librivox volunteers bring you 11 readings of Harbour Dawn by L. M. Montgomery. This was the fortnightly poem for November 23 - December 7, 2014.

By: Ludovico Ariosto (1474-1533)

Orlando Furioso by Ludovico Ariosto Orlando Furioso

Charlemagne's nephew Orlando (AKA Roland) is driven insane by the infidelity of his beloved Angelica. Angelica's relationship with him and others loosely unifies multiple story lines to produce a rich tapestry of romance, fictionalized history, and pure fantasy. This romance-epic is a sequel to the less distinguished and unfinished romance Orlando Innamorato, by Mattteo Maria Boiardo.

By: Luis Vaz de Camões (1524-1580)

The Lusiads by Luis Vaz de Camões The Lusiads

The Lusiads (Os Lusíadas) is a Portuguese epic poem, written in the 16th century by Luis Vaz de Camões. The poem tells the tale of the Portuguese discoveries in the 15th and 16th centuries, specially the voyage to India by Vasco da Gama. Modelled after the classic epic tradition, Camões' Lusiads are considered not only the first literary text in Modern Portuguese, but also a national epic of the same level as Vergil's Aeneid. In the 19th century, Sir Richard Francis Burton translated Camões' Lusiads, in what he considered "the most pleasing literary labour of his life".

By: Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880)

The Freedmen's Book by Lydia Maria Child The Freedmen's Book

Lydia Maria Child, an American abolitionist, compiled this collection of short stories and poems by former slaves and noted activists as an inspiration to freed slaves. In her dedication to the freedmen, she urges those who can read to read these stories aloud to others to share the strength, courage and accomplishments of colored men and women. In that spirit, this recording aims to gives that voice a permanent record. As in the original text, the names of the colored authors are marked with an "x".

By: Madison Cawein (1865-1914)

Book cover September

Librivox volunteers bring you ten readings of September by Madison Cawein. This was the weekly poetry project for the week of September 21st, 2014.

Book cover Don Quixote

Madison Julius Cawein was born in Louisville, Kentucky. After graduating from high school, Cawein worked in a pool hall in Louisville as a cashier in Waddill's New-market, which also served as a gambling house. He worked there for six years, saving his pay so he could return home to write. His output was thirty-six books and 1,500 poems. His writing presented Kentucky scenes in a language echoing Percy Bysshe Shelley and John Keats. He soon earned the nickname the "Keats of Kentucky". Note: In Greek mythology, Hippocrene was the name of a spring on Mt...

Book cover Time and Death and Love

Madison Cawein was a poet from Louisville, Kentucky. His output was thirty-six books and 1,500 poems. His writing earned the nickname the "Keats of Kentucky". This Weekly poem was published in his book "Shapes and Shadows". (1898)

Book cover Old Man Rain

Madison Julius Cawein was born in Louisville, the fifth child of William and Christiana Cawein. His father made patent medicines from herbs. Thus as a child, Cawein became acquainted with and developed a love for local nature. His output was thirty-six books and 1,500 poems. His writing presented Kentucky scenes in a language echoing Percy Bysshe Shelley and John Keats. He soon earned the nickname the "Keats of Kentucky". - Summary by Wikipedia

Book cover End of Summer

Cawein's poetry allied his love of nature with a devotion to earlier English and European literature, mythology, and classical allusion. - Summary by Wikipedia

Book cover Quarrel

This Weekly Poem is taken from The Poems of Madison Cawein, Volume II, New World Idylls and Poems of Love - Summary by David Lawrence

Book cover Poems of Madison Cawein Vol 5

This is Volume 5: Poems of Meditation and of Forest and Field of the collected works of Madison Julius Cawein, an American poet from Kentucky. It begins with the long poem Intimations of the Beautiful and falls into three sections: Poems of Meditation, Poems of Forest and Field, and Footpaths. - Summary by Larry Wilson

Book cover Poems of Madison Cawein Vol 3

This is Volume 3: Nature Poems of the collected works of Madison Julius Cawein, an American poet from Kentucky. It's arranged in four sections: In The Shadow of the Beeches, Tansy and Sweet-Alyssum, Weeds by the Wall, and A Voice on the Wind. It is dedicated to "Doctor Henry A. Cottel whose kind words of friendship and approval have encouraged me most when I most needed encouragement." - Summary by Larry Wilson

Book cover After A Night Of Rain

volunteers bring you 15 recordings of After A Night Of Rain by Madison Cawein. This was the Weekly Poetry project for September 1, 2019. ------ An ode to September and the changing season. - Summary by David Lawrence

Book cover Quiet

volunteers bring you 28 recordings of Quiet by Madison Cawein. This was the Weekly Poetry project for May 17, 2020. ------ Cawein's description of "A log-hut in the solitude", taken from The Poems of Madison Cawein, Volume 3, Nature Poems. - Summary by David Lawrence

By: Marcus Clarke (1846-1881)

Book cover Wail of the Waiter

volunteers bring you 12 recordings of The Wail of the Waiter by Marcus Clarke. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for May 16, 2020. ------ A little something in anticipation of the day when things return to normal and folks everywhere, particularly in the hospitality industry, are back at work. - Summary by SonOfTheExiles

Book cover In A Lady's Album

volunteers bring you 17 recordings of In A Lady's Album by Marcus Clarke. This was the Weekly Poetry project for June 7, 2020. ------ Opinion is divided as to whether this poem by a notorious bohemian was sincere or whether he was trying to burnish his credentials as a lady’s man. How you find it might well determine how you read it... - Summary by SonOfTheExiles

Book cover Mind's Eye

volunteers bring you 17 recordings of The Mind's Eye by Marcus Clarke. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for June 28, 2020. ------ This Fortnightly Poem is taken from The Australian Edition of the Selected Works of Marcus Clarke

By: Margaret Steele Anderson (1867-1921)

Book cover To The Fighting Weak

Margaret Steele Anderson was born in Louisville, Kentucky in 1867 and was educated in the public school of Louisville, with special courses at Wellesley College. From 1901 Miss Anderson was Literary Editor of the `Evening Post' of Louisville, and was known as one of the most discriminating critics of the South. She published only one volume of verse, "The Flame in the Wind", 1914. (David Lawrence

Book cover To The Men Who Went Down On The Titanic

Margaret Steele Anderson's tribute to the men left on board the doomed ship, some of whom followed the "Women and children first" tradition of the sea. - Summary by David Lawrence

Book cover Michael Angelo's "Dawn"

volunteers bring you 18 recordings of Michael Angelo's "Dawn" by Margaret Steele Anderson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for February 10, 2019. ------ Dawn is a sculpture by Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo, executed for the Medici Chapel in the area of the tomb of Lorenzo de' Medici in Florence, Italy. It is part of a second pair , which followed Day and Night in his work on the Chapel. - Summary by Wikipedia

By: Maria W. Stewart (1803-1879)

Book cover Meditations from the Pen

Maria W. Stewart was America's first black woman political writer. Between 1831 and 1833, she gave four speeches on the topics of slavery and women's rights. Meditations From The Pen of Mrs. Maria W. Stewart—published in 1879 shortly before her death—is a collection of those speeches as well as her memoir, some meditations and prayers. They are political, poetical and sermon all at the same time; but in the mileu in which she lectured, they were a critically important part of the abolitionist movement years before the contributions of others such as Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth...

By: Marian Longfellow (1849-1924)

Book cover Contrasted Songs

This is a volume of collected poetry by American poet Marian Longfellow. The poems lack a uniform theme, but, as the author puts it, "Among these "Contrasted Songs" I trust that the reader will find something to which the heart may respond." - Summary by Carolin

By: Marianne Moore (1887-1972)

Poems by Marianne Moore Poems

In 1921, American poet H.D. collected and published a selection of previously published poems by Marianne Moore. Although this angered Moore, as it was entirely unauthorized, she later accepted the edition as well made and used it as the basis for her own 1924 publication of Obersvations. Moore’s unique poetry matches the experimentation underway during the American Modernist movement. Much of it incorporates seemingly out-of-place quotations into complex free verse that often uses Nature as a subject matter...

By: Marietta Holley (1836-1926)

Book cover Poems

This is a collection of poems by Marietta Holley, better known as Josiah Allen's Wife.

By: Marion St. John Webb (1888-1930)

Book cover Littlest One - His Book

A delightful collection of humorous childrens' verse, describing the life and feelings of a little boy. - Summary by Caro Davy

By: Mark Lemon (1809-1870)

Book cover How to Make a Man of Consequence

Mark Lemon had a natural talent for journalism and the stage, and, at twenty-six, retired from less congenial business to devote himself to the writing of plays. More than sixty of his melodramas, operettas and comedies were produced in London, whilst at the same time he was contributing to a wide variety of magazines and newspapers, and was founding editor of both Punch and The Field.

By: Mary Electa Adams (1823-1898)

Book cover From Distant Shores

This is a small volume of poems by Canadian women's rights activist and educator Mary Adams.

By: Mary Hannay Foott (1846-1918)

Book cover Where the Pelican Builds

Mary Hannay Foott was an Australian poet and editor who is best remembered for the poem Where the pelican builds.

By: Mary Kyle Dallas (1830-1897)

Book cover He’d Nothing but His Violin

LibriVox volunteers bring you 13 recordings of He'd Nothing but His Violin by Mary Kyle Dallas. This was the Weekly Poetry project for March 10, 2013.According to an article in the New York Times, Mary Kyle Dallas was born in Philadelphia, PA and married Jacob A. Dallis when she was twenty. She wrote for the New York Ledger for over fifteen years.A few comments from our readers."What a lovely delicate little piece." (AlanW)"Here is my version of this sweet melodious poem. This one definitely rings a bell with me, as my wife and I were entertainers also (and even still do it occasionally) but not quite under such meager circumstances as this couple." (LenXZ1)

By: Mary Mollineux (1651-1696)

Book cover On the Sight of a Skull

Mary Mollineux (born Mary Southworth) was probably the daughter of Catholic parents who converted to Quakerism, differed from many of her Quaker contemporaries because of an early education in Latin, Greek, science, and arithmetic.

By: Mary Sidney Herbert (1561-1621)

Book cover Psalmes of David (Sidney Psalms)

A poetic version of the Psalms by Sir Philip Sidney and his sister, Mary Sidney Herbert, the Countess of Pembroke . "It is possible that the original Autograph manuscript of Sir Philip Sidney may still exist in the library at Wilton. It would have been desirable to have ascertained this, as it might prove which were versified by him, and which by his sister. This I have not been able to accomplish." Some of the Psalms may have been written by a third party. The Christian Remembrancer magazine for June, 1821 contains a paper by Dr...

By: Matthew Arnold

Balder Dead by Matthew Arnold Balder Dead

“Balder Dead” is a beautiful epic poem by Matthew Arnold. It draws from Norse mythology to retell the story of the the death of Odin’s son, Balder, instigated by the treacherous jealousy of Loki.

Tristram and Iseult & Sohrab and Rustum by Matthew Arnold Tristram and Iseult & Sohrab and Rustum

Tristram & Iseult is a narrative poem containing strong romantic and tragic themes: and was first published in 1852 by Matthew Arnold. This poem draws upon the Tristram and Iseult legends: which were popular with contemporary readers.The poem opens with Tristram upon his deathbed. The monologue of the dying man is shot through with sharp pangs of regret: centering upon his induced passion for Iseult of Ireland - inflamed by his unwittingly imbibing an irresistible love-potion.Before his decease, Tristram's lawful wife - Iseult of Ireland - arrives in time to share his deathbed...

Book cover Lake

Matthew Arnold was an English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools. Matthew Arnold has been characterised as a sage writer, a type of writer who chastises and instructs the reader on contemporary social issues. He is sometimes called the third great Victorian poet, along with Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Robert Browning. This week's poem is the first part of Arnold's Lyric Poem 'Switzerland'.

Book cover Austerity Of Poetry

Matthew Arnold was an English poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools. He has been characterised as a sage writer, a type of writer who chastises and instructs the reader on contemporary social issues.

By: Maurice Baring (1874-1945)

Book cover Poems, 1914-1919

This is a collection of Maurice Baring's poetry. This collection contains a number of Baring's earlier poetry, written before the war mostly about his travels in Russia. The other part of the collection is made up of poetry concerning World War I, with some particulalry evocative sonnets and other poems. - Summary by Carolin

By: Maurice Switzer (1870-1929)

Book cover To a Faded Rose

LibriVox readers bring you 16 recordings of "To a Faded Rose" by Maurice Switzer. This was the Weekly Poetry selection for June 16, 2013.

By: Maxwell Bodenheim (1892-1954)

Book cover Introducing Irony

Subtitled 'A Book of Poetic Short Stories and Poems', this collection reads years ahead of its time. Set mainly in Jazz Age New York City, the poems and tales are a series of profiles of people in seedier parts of town, along with bizarre love songs and even a trip to Mars. Not for the easily offended.

By: Michael Earls (1875-1937)

Book cover Sailor

Michael Earls, S.J. was a Jesuit priest, as well as a writer, poet, teacher, and administrator. - Summary by Wikipedia

By: Michael Field (1862/1846-1913/1914)

Book cover July

Michael Field was a pseudonym used for the poetry and verse drama of Katharine Harris Bradley (27 October 1846 – 26 September 1914) and her niece and ward Edith Emma Cooper (12 January 1862 – 13 December 1913). As Field they wrote around 40 works together, and a long journal Works and Days. Their intention was to keep the pen-name secret, but it became public knowledge, not long after they had confided in their friend Robert Browning.

Book cover September

Michael Field was a pseudonym used for the poetry and verse drama of Katharine Harris Bradley (27 October 1846 – 26 September 1914) and her niece and ward Edith Emma Cooper (12 January 1862 – 13 December 1913). As Field they wrote around 40 works together, and a long journal Works and Days. Their intention was to keep the pen-name secret, but it became public knowledge, not long after they had confided in their friend Robert Browning.

Book cover Underneath the Bough: A Book of Verses

This is a collection of poems by Michael Field, the pseudonym of Katharine Harris Bradley and Edith Emma Cooper. Those poems are of interest not only because they are beautiful examples of aesthetic poetry, but also because many of them contain homosexuality as a theme. The joint authors lived openly as a lesbian couple for forty years around the turn of the 20th century. - Summary by Carolin

Book cover Triumph of Bacchus and Ariadne

This Fortnightly Poem is taken from Underneath the Bough, A Book of Verses by Michael Field. - Summary by David Lawrence

Book cover Visiting Stars

Michael Field was a pseudonym used for the poetry and verse drama of Katharine Harris Bradley and her niece and ward Edith Emma Cooper . As Field they wrote around 40 works together, and a long journal Works and Days. Their intention was to keep the pen-name secret, but it became public knowledge, not long after they had confided in their friend Robert Browning. They wrote a number of passionate love poems to each other, and their name Michael Field was their way of declaring their inseparable oneness...

By: Muriel Strode (1875-1964)

Book cover My Little Book of Prayer

A number of what we might call epigrams concerning one's will, determination, spirituality, and other foci of interest. - Summary by KevinS

By: Myrtle Reed (1874-1911)

Book cover Sonnets to a Lover

This is a book of poetry by Myrtle Reed. Ms. Reed is most famous for her love stories such as A Spinner in the Sun and Old Rose and Silver, and these sonnets are an exploration of the same theme through a different medium. - Summary by Carolin

By: Nancy Cunard (1896-1965)

Book cover Wheels - The First Cycle

A series of six volumes of Wheels anthologies was produced by members of the Sitwell family, the first in 1916. Apart from Edith, Osbert and Sacheverell Sitwell, the poets represented in the series include Nancy Cunard, whose family founded the Cunard shipping line, Aldous Huxley and Wilferd Owen, as well as a number of more obscure writers. - Summary by Algy Pug

By: Nathalia Crane (1913-1998)

Book cover Janitor's Boy and Other Poems

Known for her whimsical verse and rhythmic, lilting poems Nathalia Crane was a child prodigy who published her first volume of poetry at the age of 10. There was nothing in her poems that indicated her age. Her delightful verse, and her maturity and insightfulness in poems such as The History of Honey, The Army Laundress, The Reading Boy, The Three Cornered Lot, and The Commonplace, won her recognition among poets. - Summary by AnnaLisa Bodtker

By: Nathaniel Parker Willis (1806-1867)

Book cover Declaration

Nathaniel Parker Willis is also known as N. P. Willis. He was an American author, poet and editor who worked with several notable American writers including Edgar Allan Poe and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. He became the highest-paid magazine writer of his day.

Book cover Belfry Pigeon

Nathaniel Parker Willis, also known as N. P. Willis, was an American author, poet and editor who worked with several notable American writers including Edgar Allan Poe and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. He became the highest-paid magazine writer of his day. For a time, he was the employer of former slave and future writer Harriet Jacobs.

By: Nixon Waterman (1859-1944)

Book cover Sonnets of a Budding Bard

This is a volume of 25 sonnets by American poet Nixon Waterman. The sonnets are written from the perspective of a school boy, and are very humorous, supported by some excellent illustrations by John A. Williams. - Summary by Carolin

By: Novalis

Hymns to the Night by Novalis Hymns to the Night

“Hymns to the Night” is the last published work of Georg Philipp Friedrich Freiherr von Hardenberg (1772-1801), the German philosopher and early Romantic poet whose pen name was simply “Novalis”. The work alternates poetry and prose, exploring a personal mythology of darkness and light, but it is also a free-associative chronicle of a young man rationalizing the untimely death of his fiancé. This version (1897) was translated by influential fantasy author and novelist George MacDonald, who cited it as a great – and early – inspiration.

By: Oliver Herford (1863-1935)

Book cover Kitten's Garden of Verses

The Kitten's Garden of Verses is a book of short poetry, modeled after Robert Louis Stevenson's A Child's Garden of Verses. Of course, the poems in this book are intended for kittens rather than children!

By: Oliver Wendell Holmes

The One-Hoss Shay by Oliver Wendell Holmes The One-Hoss Shay

This is a small collection of whimsical poems by the American physician and author Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. "The Deacon's Masterpiece" describes the "logical" outcome of building an object (in this case, a two-wheeled carriage called a shay) that has no weak points. The economic term "one hoss shay," referring to a certain model of depreciation, derives its name from this poem. "How the Old Horse Won the Bet" is a lighthearted look at a horse race. Finally, "The Broomstick Train" is a wonderfully Halloween-y explanation of how an electric tram really works.

By: Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (1809-1894)

Book cover Chambered Nautilus

volunteers bring you 13 recordings of The Chambered Nautilus by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for July 3, 2022. ------ The poet discovers an abandoned nautilus shell on the beach, and examining it, muses metaphorically about the beauty and precision of nature, the benefits of struggle, and the motive power of passion which propelled this creature through its life to build this magnificent edifice. It is through the example of the tiny nautilus, growing bigger...


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