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By: Various

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 129

This is a collection of 13 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for February 2014.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 141

This is a collection of 27 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for February 2015.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 130

This is a collection of 17 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for March 2014.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 114

This is a collection of poems read by LibriVox volunteers for November 2012.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 115

This is a collection of poems read by LibriVox volunteers for December 2012.

Book cover Long Poems Collection 008

LibriVox’s Long Poems Collection 008: a collection of 14 public-domain poems longer than 10 minutes in length.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 124

This is a collection of poems read by LibriVox volunteers for September 2013.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 131

This is a collection of 13 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for April 2014.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 127

This is a collection of 21 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for December 2013.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 145

This is a collection of 30 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for June 2015.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 147

This is a collection of 27 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for August 2015.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 134

This is a collection of 18 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for July 2014.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 136

This is a collection of 22 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for September 2014.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 151

This is a collection of 27 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for December 2015.

Book cover Poems of American History, The Colonial Era

A History through Poetry of the exploration and settling of North American by Europeans. Beginning with Leif Erikson, and continuing through the Age of Exploration to the colonies of Virginia and New Amsterdam, including the arrival of the Puritans, the life of Pocahontas, the persecution of the Quakers, and the horror of the Salem Witch Trials, with works by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, John Greenleaf Whittier, Edward Everett Hale, Benjamin Franklin, William Wordsworth, Julia Ward Howe, and many, many more. This is the first of 5 volumes that cover American History through poetry from the Vikings to WWI.

Book cover Birds and All Nature, Vol. IV, No 2, August 1898

"Birds and All Nature" was a monthly publication of the Nature Study Publishing Company of Chicago. It includes short poems and brief descriptions of birds, animals and other natural subjects with accompanying color plates. The magazine was published from 1897-1907 under the various titles, "Birds," "Birds and all Nature," "Nature and Art" and "Birds and Nature." Good listening for anyone with a love of nature!

Book cover Birds and all Nature, Vol. IV, No 3, September 1898

"Birds and All Nature" was a monthly publication of the Nature Study Publishing Company of Chicago. It includes short poems and brief descriptions of birds, animals and other natural subjects with accompanying color plates. The magazine was published from 1897-1907 under the various titles, "Birds," "Birds and all Nature," "Nature and Art" and "Birds and Nature."

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 144

This is a collection of 31 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for May 2015.

Book cover Short Poetry Collection 152

This is a collection of 26 poems read by LibriVox volunteers for January 2016.

By: Virgil (70 BC - 19 BC)

Book cover Aeneid, prose translation

The Aeneid is the most famous Latin epic poem, written by Virgil in the 1st century BC. The story revolves around the legendary hero Aeneas, a Trojan prince who left behind the ruins of his city and led his fellow citizens to Italy, where he became the ancestor of the Romans. The first six of the poem’s twelve books tell the story of Aeneas’ wanderings from Troy to Italy, while the poem’s second half treats the Trojans’ victorious war upon the Latins. This is the recording of J.W.MacKail's prose translation.

By: Walter Malone (1866-1915)

Book cover Opportunity

LibriVox volunteers bring you 19 recordings of Opportunity by Walter Malone. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for January 27, 2013.Walter Malone was born in DeSoto Count, Mississippi. He wrote 2 volumes of poetry before he was 20 years old. He joined his brother in law practice, but continued to publish several collections of his poems over the years.

By: A. E. Housman (1859-1936)

A Shropshire Lad by A. E. Housman A Shropshire Lad

This is a lovely collection of melodic poems, many melancholy in tone, many featuring Housman's constant theme of living this short life to the fullest.

By: Abraham Cowley (1618-1667)

Book cover Wish

LibriVox volunteers bring you 13 recordings of The Wish by Abraham Cowley. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for February 24, 2013. Abraham Cowley (/ˈkuːli/) was a leading English poet in the 16th century.

By: Adam Lindsay Gordon (1833-1870)

Book cover Song of Autumn

Adam Lindsay Gordon was an Australian poet, jockey and politician.

By: Adelaide Anne Procter (1825-1864)

Book cover Three Rulers

Adelaide Anne Procter was an English poet and philanthropist. She worked prominently on behalf of unemployed women and the homeless, and was actively involved with feminist groups and journals. She became unhealthy, possibly due to her charity work, and died of tuberculosis at the age of 38. Procter's literary career began when she was a teenager; her poems were primarily published in Charles Dickens's periodicals Household Words and All the Year Round and later published in book form. Her charity work and her conversion to Roman Catholicism appear to have strongly influenced her poetry, which deals most commonly with such subjects as homelessness, poverty, and fallen women...

By: Aemilia Lanyer (1569-1645)

Book cover Salve Deus Rex Judaeorum

Aemilia Lanyer's 1611 poem is far more than a retelling of The Passion. It comprises a spirited defense of Eve (and, by extension, all women), elegant praises for her female patrons, a catalogue of virtuous women of the ancient world, and closes with the first "country house" poem written by a woman in English.

By: Albert Bigelow Paine (1861-1937)

Book cover Mis' Smith

LibriVox volunteers bring you 15 recordings of Mis' Smith,/em>, by Albert Paine. This was the Weekly Poetry project for April 7th, 2013.

By: Aldous Huxley (1894-1963)

Book cover Defeat of Youth and Other Poems

Though later known for his essays and novels, Aldous Huxley started his writing career as a poet. Published in 1918, The Defeat of Youth and Other Poems is his third compilation of poetry. The volume begins with "The Defeat of Youth", a sequence of twenty-two sonnets that explores irreconcilability of the ideal and the disappointing reality. Jerome Meckier called it “the century’s most successful sonnet sequence, better than Auden’s or Edna St. Vincent Millay’s.” In the rest of the volume, Huxley continues to explore themes started in The Burning Wheel, his first volume of poetry, including vision, blindness, and other contrasts...

By: Alexander Pope (1688-1744)

An Essay on Man by Alexander Pope An Essay on Man

Pope’s Essay on Man, a masterpiece of concise summary in itself, can fairly be summed up as an optimistic enquiry into mankind’s place in the vast Chain of Being. Each of the poem’s four Epistles takes a different perspective, presenting Man in relation to the universe, as individual, in society and, finally, tracing his prospects for achieving the goal of happiness. In choosing stately rhyming couplets to explore his theme, Pope sometimes becomes obscure through compressing his language overmuch...

An Essay on Criticism by Alexander Pope An Essay on Criticism

An Essay on Criticism was the first major poem written by the English writer Alexander Pope (1688-1744). However, despite the title, the poem is not as much an original analysis as it is a compilation of Pope’s various literary opinions. A reading of the poem makes it clear that he is addressing not so much the ingenuous reader as the intending writer. It is written in a type of rhyming verse called heroic couplets.

The Rape of the Lock by Alexander Pope The Rape of the Lock

The Rape of the Lock is a mock-heroic narrative poem written by Alexander Pope, first published anonymously in Lintot's Miscellany in May 1712 in two cantos (334 lines), but then revised, expanded and reissued under Pope's name on March 2, 1714, in a much-expanded 5-canto version (794 lines). The final form was available in 1717 with the addition of Clarissa's speech on good humour. The poem satirizes a petty squabble by comparing it to the epic world of the gods. It was based on an incident recounted by Pope's friend, John Caryll...

By: Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837)

Eugene Onéguine by Alexander Pushkin Eugene Onéguine

Eugene Onéguine is a classic of Russian literature, and its eponymous protagonist has served as the model for a number of Russian literary heroes (so-called superfluous men). It was published in serial form between 1825 and 1832. The first complete edition was published in 1833, and the currently accepted version is based on the 1837 publication.Almost the entire work is made up of 389 stanzas of iambic tetrameter with the unusual rhyme scheme "AbAbCCddEffEgg", where the uppercase letters represent feminine rhymes while the lowercase letters represent masculine rhymes...

By: Alfred Moffat (1866-1950)

Our Old Nursery Rhymes by Alfred Moffat Our Old Nursery Rhymes

If you love and cherish old English nursery rhymes and have fond memories of your early childhood years, Our Old Nursery Rhymes by Alfred Moffat published in 1911 is indeed the little book for you! Or as a parent, if you'd like your own children to share the magic, this book provides them all. One of the most appealing aspects of this charming book is that the rhymes are all set to music and if you're musically inclined, you can certainly keep yourself and your children entertained by playing these pretty tunes...

By: Alfred Noyes (1880-1958)

Book cover Drake

Alfred Noyes, in the blank-verse epic "Drake", fictionalizes the historical Francis Drake, who, during the reign of Elizabeth I of England, sailed (and plundered) on the Spanish Main and beyond.

By: Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892)

In Memoriam A.H.H. by Alfred, Lord Tennyson In Memoriam A.H.H.

In Memoriam is Tennyson’s elegiac tribute to his friend Arthur Henry Hallam, who died in 1833 at the age of 22. Tennyson wrote this long poem over 17 years as a chronicle of his mourning process. The poem became a favorite of Queen Victoria when she was grieving for her husband, and was one of the most popular and artistically influential poems of the Victorian period.

Idylls of the King by Alfred, Lord Tennyson Idylls of the King

Idylls of the King, published between 1856 and 1885, is a cycle of twelve narrative poems by the English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson which retells the legend of King Arthur, his knights, his love for Guinevere and her tragic betrayal of him, and the rise and fall of Arthur's kingdom. The whole work recounts Arthur's attempt and failure to lift up mankind and create a perfect kingdom, from his coming to power to his death at the hands of the traitor Mordred. Individual poems detail the deeds of various knights, including Lancelot, Geraint, Galahad, and Balin and Balan, and also Merlin and the Lady of the Lake.

Book cover The Princess

The Princess is a serio-comic blank verse narrative poem, written by Alfred Tennyson, published in 1847. The poem tells the story of an heroic princess who forswears the world of men and founds a women's university where men are forbidden to enter. The prince to whom she was betrothed in infancy enters the university with two friends, disguised as women students. They are discovered and flee, but eventually they fight a battle for the princess's hand.

Book cover Charge of the Light Brigade

This poem was published just six weeks after the event, its lines emphasize the valour of the cavalry in bravely carrying out their orders, regardless of the obvious outcome. The Charge of the Light Brigade was a charge of British light cavalry led by Lord Cardigan against Russian forces during the Battle of Balaclava on 25 October 1854 in the Crimean War. Lord Raglan, overall commander of the British forces, had intended to send the Light Brigade to pursue and harry a retreating Russian artillery battery, a task well-suited to light cavalry...

By: Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837-1909)

Book cover Century of Roundels

A roundel (not to be confused with the rondel) is a form of verse used in English language poetry devised by Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837–1909). It is a variation of the French rondeau form. It makes use of refrains, repeated according to a certain stylized pattern. A roundel consists of nine lines each having the same number of syllables, plus a refrain after the third line and after the last line. The refrain must be identical with the beginning of the first line: it may be a half-line, and rhymes with the second line...

By: Alice Meynell (1847-1922)

Book cover Fold

Alice Christiana Gertrude Meynell was an English writer, editor, critic, and suffragist, now remembered mainly as a poet. At the end of the 19th century, in conjunction with uprisings against the British (among them the Indians', the Zulus', the Boxer Rebellion, and the Muslim revolt led by Muhammad Ahmed in the Sudan), many European scholars, writers, and artists, began to question Europe's colonial imperialism. This led the Meynells and others in their circle to speak out for the oppressed. Alice Meynell was a vice-president of the Women Writers' Suffrage League, founded by Cicely Hamilton and active 1908–19.

By: Aline Kilmer (1888-1941)

Book cover Autumn Walk with Deborah

Librivox volunteers bring you eight readings of An Autumn Walk with Deborah by Aline Kilmer. This was the weekly poetry project for the week of October 12, 2014.

By: Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914)

Book cover Interpretation

LibriVox volunteers bring you 8 recordings of An Interpretation by Ambrose Bierce. This was the Weekly Poetry project for September 22, 2013.

By: Amy Levy (1861-1889)

A London Plane-Tree, and Other Verse by Amy Levy A London Plane-Tree, and Other Verse

Amy Levy was a British poet and novelist who is celebrated for her feminist positions and her engagement with homosexual romance during the Victorian era. Levy wrote stories, essays, and poems for periodicals, some popular and others literary. Her writing career began early; her poem "Ida Grey" appearing in the journal, The Pelican, when she was only fourteen. Her final book of poems, A London Plane-Tree And Other Verse (1889), contains lyrics that are among the first to show the influence of French symbolism. (Introduction excerpted from Wikipedia)

By: Amy Lowell (1874-1925)

Book cover Dome of Many-Coloured Glass

This is a collection of lyrical poems, sonnets and verses for children by Amy Lowell."For quaint pictorial exactitude and bizarrerie of color these poems remind one of Flemish masters and Dutch tulip gardens; again, they are fine and fantastic, like Venetian glass; and they are all curiously flooded with the moonlight of dreams. . . . Miss Lowell has a remarkable gift of what one might call the dramatic-decorative. Her decorative imagery is intensely dramatic, and her dramatic pictures are in themselves vivid and fantastic decorations." (Richard Le Gallienne, 'New York Times Book Review', 1916)

Book cover Men, Women and Ghosts

This is a collection of long poems and short stories by Amy Lowell.

By: Andrew B. Paterson

The Man from Snowy River and other Verses by Andrew B. Paterson The Man from Snowy River and other Verses

A collection of poems by Australian poet Andrew Barton ‘Banjo’ Paterson, picturesque glimpses into life in the Bush. From the preface: “A number of these verses are now published for the first time, most of the others were written for and appeared in ‘The Bulletin’ (Sydney, N.S.W.), and are therefore already widely known to readers in Australasia.”

Book cover Bush Debate

In 1892, two of Australia's best poets came up with a scheme to make some money. They arranged to have an argument in the Weekly Bulletin, and since they were being paid by the word, this let them fire back and forth, being sent beer money with each salvo. A couple of other poets also joined in, and their work is seminal to the development of the Bush ethos in Australia. The first eight files are the original form of the poems, and the second eight are later republications by the authors, in their own collections.

By: Andrew Lang (1844-1912)

Book cover Romance

LibriVox volunteers bring you 16 readings of Romance by Andrew Lang, probably best known as Edward Elgar's song My Love Dwelt in a Northern Land. Interestingly, Lang initially refused permission for his words to be used as lyrics, and Elgar's wife Alice wrote alternative words Afar, amidst the Sunny Isles for the song. However, Lang later relented and gave permission for his poem to be used. The poem was initially published in The Century Magazine, May 1882, and this is the version recorded here. Later collections of Lang's poetry omit the third verse.

By: Ann Hawkshaw (1812-1885)

Book cover Dionysius the Areopagite, with other poems

An early figure in the birth of poetry in industrial Manchester, Ann Hawkshaw published three collections and another was circulated privately. Her first collection. published in Manchester and London in 1842, begins with an epic poem, Dionysius the Areopagite. Based on the New Testament story of the conversion of Dionysius by St Paul, much of the poem centres on the consequences of Dionysius' conversion for his betrothed, Myra, and her sister, Corrina. The collection also includes two of Hawkshaw's most important works, The Past and The Future, and a number of shorter poems on themes of history, loss and faith.

By: Ann Radcliffe (1764-1823)

Book cover EDWY: A Poem, in Three Parts

In Edwy, Ann Radcliffe gives us a delightful piece of poetic moonshine, whose eponymous hero seeks assistance from the world of faerie in order to spy on his girlfriend, Aura, and see if she really loves him. He does this by venturing unseen into Windsor Forest at night to trap the love-fay, Eda, who, once spellbound, must reveal all and let him remotely view Aura's activities by means of a magic mirror cut from crystal. In addition to this early form of cyberstalking, Edwy, on his night-journey into the forest gets to witness a royal procession of the Fairie Queen, followed by midnight revels of elves and spirits...

By: Anna Katharine Green (1864-1935)

Book cover Defence of the Bride and Other Poems

Anna Katharine Green is now best-known for her popular mystery and detective stories, but she also wrote some excellent poetry.

By: Anne Kingsmill Finch (1661-1720)

Book cover Apology

Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea, was an English poet, the third child of Sir William Kingsmill of Sydmonton Court and his wife, Anne Haslewood. She was well-educated as her family believed in good education for girls as well as for boys. In her works Finch drew upon her own observations and experiences, demonstrating an insightful awareness of the social mores and political climate of her era. But she also artfully recorded her private thoughts, which could be joyful or despairing, playful or despondent. The poems also revealed her highly developed spiritual side.

By: Anne Wales Abbott ed. (1808-1908)

Autumn Leaves, Original Pieces in Prose and Verse by Anne Wales Abbott ed. Autumn Leaves, Original Pieces in Prose and Verse

The pieces gathered into this volume were, with two exceptions, written for the entertainment of a private circle, without any view to publication. The editor would express her thanks to the writers, who, at her solicitation, have allowed them to be printed. They are published with the hope of aiding a work of charity,—the establishment of an Agency for the benefit of the poor in Cambridge,—to which the proceeds of the sale will be devoted.

By: Anonymous

The Real Mother Goose by Anonymous The Real Mother Goose

A heartwarming collection of nursery rhymes that will take you back to your childhood!

Eirik the Red's Saga by Anonymous Eirik the Red's Saga

In this saga, the events that led to Eirik the Red’s banishment to Greenland are chronicled, as well as Leif Eirikson’s discovery of Vinland the Good (a place where wheat and grapes grew naturally), after his longboat was blown off-course. By geographical details, this place is surmised to be present-day Newfoundland, and is likely the first European discovery of the American mainland, some five centuries before Christopher Columbus’s journey.

The Song of Roland by Anonymous The Song of Roland

The Song of Roland is an epic poem, originally sung in Old French. It tells the story of the Battle of Roncevaux Pass in 778. This is an English translation. Translated by Charles Kenneth Scott-Moncrieff.

By: Anthony Munday (1560? -1633)

Book cover Sir Thomas More

Sir Thomas More is a collaborative Elizabethan play by Anthony Munday and others depicting the life and death of Thomas More. It survives only in a single manuscript, now owned by the British Library. The manuscript is notable because three pages of it are considered to be in the hand of William Shakespeare and for the light it sheds on the collaborative nature of Elizabethan drama and the theatrical censorship of the era. The play dramatizes events in More's life, both real and legendary, in an episodic manner in 17 scenes, unified only by the rise and fall of More's fortunes.

By: Aristotle (384-322 BC)

Poetics by Aristotle Poetics

Aristotle’s Poetics from the 4th century B.C. aims to give a short study of storytelling. It discusses things like unity of plot, reversal of situation, and character in the context of Greek tragedy, comedy and epic poetry. But it still applies today. It is especially popular with screenwriters as seen in many script gurus’ how-to books.

By: Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861)

Book cover Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth

Arthur Hugh Clough (kluf) was an English poet, an educationalist, and the devoted assistant to ground-breaking nurse Florence Nightingale. He was the brother of suffragist Anne Clough, who became principal of Newnham College, Cambridge.

By: Arthur Macy (1842-1904)

Book cover Mrs. Mulligatawny

Arthur Macy was a Nantucket boy of Quaker extraction. His name alone is evidence of this, for it is safe to say that a Macy, wherever found in the United States, is descended from that sturdy old Quaker who was one of those who bought Nantucket from the Indians, paid them fairly for it, treated them with justice, and lived on friendly terms with them. In many ways Arthur Macy showed that he was a Nantucketer and, at least by descent, a Quaker. He often used phrases peculiar to our island in the sea, and was given, in conversation at least, to similes which smacked of salt water. Almost the last time I saw him he said, "I'm coming round soon for a good long gam."


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