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By: Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809-1892)

Book cover Charge of the Light Brigade

This poem was published just six weeks after the event, its lines emphasize the valour of the cavalry in bravely carrying out their orders, regardless of the obvious outcome. The Charge of the Light Brigade was a charge of British light cavalry led by Lord Cardigan against Russian forces during the Battle of Balaclava on 25 October 1854 in the Crimean War. Lord Raglan, overall commander of the British forces, had intended to send the Light Brigade to pursue and harry a retreating Russian artillery battery, a task well-suited to light cavalry...

By: Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837-1909)

Book cover Century of Roundels

A roundel (not to be confused with the rondel) is a form of verse used in English language poetry devised by Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837–1909). It is a variation of the French rondeau form. It makes use of refrains, repeated according to a certain stylized pattern. A roundel consists of nine lines each having the same number of syllables, plus a refrain after the third line and after the last line. The refrain must be identical with the beginning of the first line: it may be a half-line, and rhymes with the second line...

By: Alice Meynell (1847-1922)

Book cover Fold

Alice Christiana Gertrude Meynell was an English writer, editor, critic, and suffragist, now remembered mainly as a poet. At the end of the 19th century, in conjunction with uprisings against the British (among them the Indians', the Zulus', the Boxer Rebellion, and the Muslim revolt led by Muhammad Ahmed in the Sudan), many European scholars, writers, and artists, began to question Europe's colonial imperialism. This led the Meynells and others in their circle to speak out for the oppressed. Alice Meynell was a vice-president of the Women Writers' Suffrage League, founded by Cicely Hamilton and active 1908–19.

By: Aline Kilmer (1888-1941)

Book cover Autumn Walk with Deborah

Librivox volunteers bring you eight readings of An Autumn Walk with Deborah by Aline Kilmer. This was the weekly poetry project for the week of October 12, 2014.

Book cover In Spring

Aline Murray Kilmer , was an American poet, children's book author, and essayist, and the wife and widow of poet and journalist Joyce Kilmer . Aline attended the Rutgers College Preparatory School with her husband, Alfred Joyce Kilmer and married him soon after his graduation from Columbia University in 1908. In their short marriage, lasting 10 years, her husband had achieved fame as a poet, literary critic and among Catholic circles as America's most prominent Catholic writer. After his death in World War I, Aline began publishing her own poetry and a few children's books. Today, her work is largely forgotten. - Summary by Wikipedia

Book cover To Two Little Sisters of the Poor

Aline Murray Kilmer , was an American poet, children's book author, and essayist, and the wife and widow of poet and journalist Joyce Kilmer . Aline attended the Rutgers College Preparatory School with her husband, Alfred Joyce Kilmer and married him soon after his graduation from Columbia University in 1908. In their short marriage, lasting 10 years, her husband had achieved fame as a poet, literary critic and among Catholic circles as America's most prominent Catholic writer. After his death in World War I, Aline began publishing her own poetry and a few children's books. Today, her work is largely forgotten. - Summary by Wikipedia

Book cover Vigils

This is a volume of poetry by American poet Aline Murray Kilmer, widow of the poet Joyce Kilmer. These poems have been published several years after Joyce Kilmer's death in 1918 while he was deployed in France, and their daughter Rose's death in 1917. Many of the poems in this collection thus also center around a motive of grief and loss, and set these emotions into poetry of heartbreaking beauty. - Summary by Carolin

By: Ambrose Bierce (1842-1914)

Book cover Interpretation

LibriVox volunteers bring you 8 recordings of An Interpretation by Ambrose Bierce. This was the Weekly Poetry project for September 22, 2013.

By: Ameen Rihani (1876-1940)

Book cover Chant of Mystics, and Other Poems

This is a volume of poetry by the influential Lebanese American author Ameen Rihani. In these poems, the author playfully introduces the American public of the early 1920's to the environment in which he grew up, embellishing the poems with folklore and fairy tale romance. - Summary by Carolin

By: Amy Levy (1861-1889)

A London Plane-Tree, and Other Verse by Amy Levy A London Plane-Tree, and Other Verse

Amy Levy was a British poet and novelist who is celebrated for her feminist positions and her engagement with homosexual romance during the Victorian era. Levy wrote stories, essays, and poems for periodicals, some popular and others literary. Her writing career began early; her poem "Ida Grey" appearing in the journal, The Pelican, when she was only fourteen. Her final book of poems, A London Plane-Tree And Other Verse (1889), contains lyrics that are among the first to show the influence of French symbolism. (Introduction excerpted from Wikipedia)

By: Amy Lowell (1874-1925)

Book cover Dome of Many-Coloured Glass

This is a collection of lyrical poems, sonnets and verses for children by Amy Lowell."For quaint pictorial exactitude and bizarrerie of color these poems remind one of Flemish masters and Dutch tulip gardens; again, they are fine and fantastic, like Venetian glass; and they are all curiously flooded with the moonlight of dreams. . . . Miss Lowell has a remarkable gift of what one might call the dramatic-decorative. Her decorative imagery is intensely dramatic, and her dramatic pictures are in themselves vivid and fantastic decorations." (Richard Le Gallienne, 'New York Times Book Review', 1916)

Book cover Men, Women and Ghosts

This is a collection of long poems and short stories by Amy Lowell.

By: Anacreon (582 BCE-485 BCE)

Book cover Ode 7

volunteers bring you 19 recordings of Ode 7 by Anacreon, translated by Sir Thomas Moore. This was the Weekly Poetry project for August 14, 2022. ----- The more things change, the more they stay the same. Written sometime around 500 BC, this little poem expresses the desire to live life to the fullest with the time one has left. Here's to gray hair and the autumn of one's life! - Summary by TriciaG

By: Andrew B. Paterson

The Man from Snowy River and other Verses by Andrew B. Paterson The Man from Snowy River and other Verses

A collection of poems by Australian poet Andrew Barton ‘Banjo’ Paterson, picturesque glimpses into life in the Bush. From the preface: “A number of these verses are now published for the first time, most of the others were written for and appeared in ‘The Bulletin’ (Sydney, N.S.W.), and are therefore already widely known to readers in Australasia.”

Book cover Bush Debate

In 1892, two of Australia's best poets came up with a scheme to make some money. They arranged to have an argument in the Weekly Bulletin, and since they were being paid by the word, this let them fire back and forth, being sent beer money with each salvo. A couple of other poets also joined in, and their work is seminal to the development of the Bush ethos in Australia. The first eight files are the original form of the poems, and the second eight are later republications by the authors, in their own collections.

By: Andrew Barton Paterson (1864-1941)

Book cover Mountain Station

volunteers bring you 12 recordings of A Mountain Station by Andrew Barton 'Banjo' Paterson. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for April 4, 2021. ------ Andrew Barton "Banjo" Paterson, CBE was an Australian bush poet, journalist and author. He wrote many ballads and poems about Australian life, focusing particularly on the rural and outback areas, including the district around Binalong, New South Wales, his "Waltzing Matilda" is regarded widely as Australia's unofficial national anthem. This poem is taken from The Man from Snowy River and Other Verses by Andrew Barton 'Banjo' Paterson. - Summary by Wikipedia

Book cover Our Mat

volunteers bring you 15 recordings of Our Mat by A. B. Paterson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for July 14, 2019. ------ Banjo Paterson's speculations on a piece of prison craft. This poem references The Darlinghurst Gaol, a former Australian prison located in Darlinghurst, New South Wales. Australian poet Henry Lawson spent time incarcerated there during some of the turbulent years of his life and described the gaol as Starvinghurst Gaol due to meagre rations given to the inmates. It was closed in 1914 and has subsequently been repurposed to house the National Art School.

Book cover Not on It

volunteers bring you 17 recordings of Not on It by Andrew Barton Paterson. This was the Weekly Poetry project for April 12, 2020. ------ This Weekly Poem is from the original collection SALTBUSH BILL, J.P., AND OTHER VERSES, which includes 43 poems by the author that are reprinted from various sources. The book formed part of the publisher's series of "Pocket Editions for the Trenches", designed to fit a serviceman's coat pocket.

By: Andrew Lang (1844-1912)

Book cover Romance

LibriVox volunteers bring you 16 readings of Romance by Andrew Lang, probably best known as Edward Elgar's song My Love Dwelt in a Northern Land. Interestingly, Lang initially refused permission for his words to be used as lyrics, and Elgar's wife Alice wrote alternative words Afar, amidst the Sunny Isles for the song. However, Lang later relented and gave permission for his poem to be used. The poem was initially published in The Century Magazine, May 1882, and this is the version recorded here. Later collections of Lang's poetry omit the third verse.

Book cover Blue Poetry Book

This anthology poetry, gathered by Andrew Lang and originally published in 1891, is read by four voices, Larry Wilson, Ciufi Galeazzi, Lynette Caulkins and J. Thurgood.

By: Andrew Marvell (1621-1678)

Book cover To His Coy Mistress (version 2)

Andrew Marvell was an English metaphysical poet, satirist and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1659 and 1678. During the Commonwealth period he was a colleague and friend of John Milton. His poems range from the love-song "To His Coy Mistress", to evocations of an aristocratic country house and garden in "Upon Appleton House" and "The Garden", the political address "An Horatian Ode upon Cromwell's Return from Ireland", and the later personal and political satires "Flecknoe" and "The Character of Holland". - Summary by Wikipedia

By: Ann Hawkshaw (1812-1885)

Book cover Poems for my Children

Published in 1847, five years after her epic poem, 'Dionysus the Areopagite', 'Poems For My Children' was Ann Hawkshaw's second collection of poetry. The poems are dedicated to her six children and many are written in an intimate conversational style. 'Ada', the final poem in the collection, is a memorial for her second child, who had died of hydrocephalus shortly before her fifth birthday. Five historical poems, set in the times of the Druids, the Romans the Saxons, the Normans and the Crusades, punctuate the collection and anticipate her later collection, 'Sonnets on Anglo-Saxon History'.

Book cover Dionysius the Areopagite, with other poems

An early figure in the birth of poetry in industrial Manchester, Ann Hawkshaw published three collections and another was circulated privately. Her first collection. published in Manchester and London in 1842, begins with an epic poem, Dionysius the Areopagite. Based on the New Testament story of the conversion of Dionysius by St Paul, much of the poem centres on the consequences of Dionysius' conversion for his betrothed, Myra, and her sister, Corrina. The collection also includes two of Hawkshaw's most important works, The Past and The Future, and a number of shorter poems on themes of history, loss and faith.

By: Ann Radcliffe (1764-1823)

Book cover EDWY: A Poem, in Three Parts

In Edwy, Ann Radcliffe gives us a delightful piece of poetic moonshine, whose eponymous hero seeks assistance from the world of faerie in order to spy on his girlfriend, Aura, and see if she really loves him. He does this by venturing unseen into Windsor Forest at night to trap the love-fay, Eda, who, once spellbound, must reveal all and let him remotely view Aura's activities by means of a magic mirror cut from crystal. In addition to this early form of cyberstalking, Edwy, on his night-journey into the forest gets to witness a royal procession of the Fairie Queen, followed by midnight revels of elves and spirits...

By: Anna Hempstead Branch (1875-1937)

Book cover Mother's Song

volunteers bring you 16 recordings of A Mother's Song by Anna Hempstead Branch. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for May 3, 2020. ------ A tribute to Mothers everywhere. Taken from The shoes that danced, and other poems by Anna Hempstead Branch, - Summary by David Lawrence

By: Anna Katharine Green (1864-1935)

Book cover At the Piano

Anna Katharine Green was an American poet and novelist. She was one of the first writers of detective fiction in America and distinguished herself by writing well plotted, legally accurate stories. Green has been called "the mother of the detective novel". - Summary by Wikipedia

Book cover Defence of the Bride and Other Poems

Anna Katharine Green is now best-known for her popular mystery and detective stories, but she also wrote some excellent poetry.

By: Anne Kingsmill Finch (1661-1720)

Book cover Apology

Anne Finch, Countess of Winchilsea, was an English poet, the third child of Sir William Kingsmill of Sydmonton Court and his wife, Anne Haslewood. She was well-educated as her family believed in good education for girls as well as for boys. In her works Finch drew upon her own observations and experiences, demonstrating an insightful awareness of the social mores and political climate of her era. But she also artfully recorded her private thoughts, which could be joyful or despairing, playful or despondent. The poems also revealed her highly developed spiritual side.

By: Anne Lynch Botta (1815-1891)

Book cover Thoughts in a Library

volunteers bring you 24 recordings of Thoughts in a Library by Anne Lynch Botta. This was the Weekly Poetry project for March 28, 2021. ------ Anne Charlotte Lynch Botta was an American poet, writer, teacher and socialite whose home was the central gathering place of the literary elite of her era. - Summary by Wikipedia

By: Anne Wales Abbott ed. (1808-1908)

Autumn Leaves, Original Pieces in Prose and Verse by Anne Wales Abbott ed. Autumn Leaves, Original Pieces in Prose and Verse

The pieces gathered into this volume were, with two exceptions, written for the entertainment of a private circle, without any view to publication. The editor would express her thanks to the writers, who, at her solicitation, have allowed them to be printed. They are published with the hope of aiding a work of charity,—the establishment of an Agency for the benefit of the poor in Cambridge,—to which the proceeds of the sale will be devoted.

By: Anonymous

The Real Mother Goose by Anonymous The Real Mother Goose

A heartwarming collection of nursery rhymes that will take you back to your childhood!

Eirik the Red's Saga by Anonymous Eirik the Red's Saga

In this saga, the events that led to Eirik the Red’s banishment to Greenland are chronicled, as well as Leif Eirikson’s discovery of Vinland the Good (a place where wheat and grapes grew naturally), after his longboat was blown off-course. By geographical details, this place is surmised to be present-day Newfoundland, and is likely the first European discovery of the American mainland, some five centuries before Christopher Columbus’s journey.

The Song of Roland by Anonymous The Song of Roland

The Song of Roland is an epic poem, originally sung in Old French. It tells the story of the Battle of Roncevaux Pass in 778. This is an English translation. Translated by Charles Kenneth Scott-Moncrieff.

Book cover Please Buy My Verses

volunteers bring you 10 recordings of Please Buy My Verses by Anonymous. This was the Weekly Poetry project for November 18, 2018. ------ PLEASE BUY MY VERSES. PRICE: WHAT YOU PLEASE The Bearer Lost His Eyesight While Blasting in December, 1868. - Summary by text

Book cover Santa Claus, Kriss Kringle or St. NIcholas

volunteers bring you 14 recordings of Santa Claus, Kriss Kringle or St. NIcholas by Anomymous. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for December 16, 2018. ------ This poem was published in booklet form with illustrations in 1897. - Summary by David Lawrence

Book cover Merry Christmas : two early birds

volunteers bring you 11 recordings of A Merry Christmas : two early birds by anonymous. This was the Weekly Poetry project for December 11. 2018. ------ This Christmas pamphlet, dated 1890, from The Mail and Empire, a Toronto newspaper, solicits Christmas donations for the newspaper delivery boys. - Summary by David Lawrence

By: Anthony Munday (1560? -1633)

Book cover Sir Thomas More

Sir Thomas More is a collaborative Elizabethan play by Anthony Munday and others depicting the life and death of Thomas More. It survives only in a single manuscript, now owned by the British Library. The manuscript is notable because three pages of it are considered to be in the hand of William Shakespeare and for the light it sheds on the collaborative nature of Elizabethan drama and the theatrical censorship of the era. The play dramatizes events in More's life, both real and legendary, in an episodic manner in 17 scenes, unified only by the rise and fall of More's fortunes.

By: Aristotle (384-322 BC)

Poetics by Aristotle Poetics

Aristotle’s Poetics from the 4th century B.C. aims to give a short study of storytelling. It discusses things like unity of plot, reversal of situation, and character in the context of Greek tragedy, comedy and epic poetry. But it still applies today. It is especially popular with screenwriters as seen in many script gurus’ how-to books.

By: Arthur Hugh Clough (1819-1861)

Book cover Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth

Arthur Hugh Clough (kluf) was an English poet, an educationalist, and the devoted assistant to ground-breaking nurse Florence Nightingale. He was the brother of suffragist Anne Clough, who became principal of Newnham College, Cambridge.

By: Arthur Macy (1842-1904)

Book cover Mrs. Mulligatawny

Arthur Macy was a Nantucket boy of Quaker extraction. His name alone is evidence of this, for it is safe to say that a Macy, wherever found in the United States, is descended from that sturdy old Quaker who was one of those who bought Nantucket from the Indians, paid them fairly for it, treated them with justice, and lived on friendly terms with them. In many ways Arthur Macy showed that he was a Nantucketer and, at least by descent, a Quaker. He often used phrases peculiar to our island in the sea, and was given, in conversation at least, to similes which smacked of salt water. Almost the last time I saw him he said, "I'm coming round soon for a good long gam."

Book cover In Remembrance

volunteers bring you 14 recordings of In Remembrance by Arthur Macy. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for November 7, 2021. ------ A tribute to friends both past and present, this poem is taken from Poems by Arthur Macy - Summary by David Lawrence

Book cover Easy Knowledge

Arthur Macy did not consider his work of sufficiently high poetic standard to be published. Every one praised his choice of words, his wonderful facility in rhyme, the perfection of his metre, and the daintiness and delicacy of his verse. "All right," he would say, "but that is not Poetry with a big P, and that is the only kind that should be published. And there is mighty little of it."

Book cover Five Senses

Arthur Macy was a Nantucket boy of Quaker extraction. His name alone is evidence of this, for it is safe to say that a Macy, wherever found in the United States, is descended from that sturdy old Quaker who was one of those who bought Nantucket from the Indians, paid them fairly for it, treated them with justice, and lived on friendly terms with them. In many ways Arthur Macy showed that he was a Nantucketer and, at least by descent, a Quaker. He often used phrases peculiar to our island in the sea, and was given, in conversation at least, to similes which smacked of salt water...

By: Arthur Symons (1865-1945)

Book cover Rain On The Down

Our Valentine Poem is by Arthur William Symons, a British poet, critic and magazine editor., taken from his collection Silhouettes . - Summary by David Lawrence

By: Arthur Weir (1864-1902)

Book cover Snowflake and Other Poems

This is a volume of Canadian poet Arthur Weir. Many of the poems are set around the turn of a year, referencing the season in different ways, and touching upon almost every emotion and association we might connect with winter. - Summary by Carolin

By: Augusta Webster (1837-1894)

Book cover Mother and Daughter

Uncompleted at her death, Augusta Webster's posthumously published sonnet sequence Mother and Daughter celebrates the relationship between a mother and her only child. As well as reflecting on aging and mortality, the sonnets express joy and love. This volume includes seven additional sonnets on other themes.

By: Beatrice Bradshaw Brown

Book cover Paris Pair, Their Day's Doings

volunteers bring you 9 recordings of Paris Pair, Their Day's Doings by Beatrice Bradshaw Brown. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for January 20, 2019. ------ A poetic summary of a day in the life of two children in Paris.

By: Ben Jonson (1572-1637)

The Forest by Ben Jonson The Forest

The Forest is a short collection of Ben Jonson’s poetry. This collection of fifteen poems first appeared in the 1616 first folio of his collected works.

By: Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson (1832-1910)

Book cover Mountain Song

LibriVox volunteers bring you nine recordings of "Mountain Song” by Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson. The Weekly Poem for August 31, 2014 takes us up to the mountain heights of Norway.

By: Bliss Carman

Ballads of Lost Haven: A Book of the Sea by Bliss Carman Ballads of Lost Haven: A Book of the Sea

This collection of lyric poems evokes the sea in every line, from birth (A Son of the Sea) to death (Outbound). The smells, sights and sounds of the Canada's East Coast feature prominently.

Book cover Hearse-Horse

volunteers bring you 15 recordings of The Hearse-Horse by Bliss Carman. This was the Weekly Poetry project for October 28, 2018. ------- Bliss Carman, FRSC was a Canadian poet who lived most of his life in the United States, where he achieved international fame. He was acclaimed as Canada's poet laureate during his later years. Richard Hovey was an American poet.. He collaborated with Canadian poet Bliss Carman on three volumes of "tramp" verse: Songs from Vagabondia , More Songs from Vagabondia , and Last Songs from Vagabondia , the last being published after Hovey's death...

Book cover By the Aurelian Wall and Other Elegies

This is a small volume of beautiful melancholy verses by Canadian poet Bliss Carman. The poems share a common theme which is the death of persons known and unknown to the poet. - Summary by Carolin

Book cover Nocturne: In Anjou

volunteers bring you 19 recordings of Nocturne: In Anjou by Bliss Carman and Richard Hovey. This was the Weekly Poetry project for November 10, 2019. ------ Richard Hovey collaborated with Canadian poet Bliss Carman on three volumes of "tramp" verse: Songs from Vagabondia , More Songs from Vagabondia , and Last Songs from Vagabondia , the last being published after Hovey's death. Hovey and Carman were members of the "Visionists" social circle along with F. Holland Day and Herbert Copeland, who published the "Vagabondia" series. - Summary by Wikipedia

By: Bret Harte (1836-1902)

Book cover What the Wolf Really Said to Little Red Riding Hood

Francis Bret Harte was an American author and poet, best remembered for his short fiction featuring miners, gamblers, and other romantic figures of the California Gold Rush. In a career spanning more than four decades, he wrote poetry, fiction, plays, lectures, book reviews, editorials, and magazine sketches in addition to fiction. As he moved from California to the eastern U.S. to Europe, he incorporated new subjects and characters into his stories, but his Gold Rush tales have been most often reprinted, adapted, and admired.

Book cover Society Upon The Stanislaus

volunteers bring you 12 recordings of The Society Upon The Stanislaus by Bret Harte. This was the Fortnightly Poetry project for January 24, 2021. ------ Taken from Little Masterpieces of American Wit and Humor, Volume II by Thomas L. Masson - Summary by David Lawrence

By: Brontë sisters

Selected Poems by Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell by Brontë sisters Selected Poems by Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell

Poems by Currer, Ellis and Acton Bell was a volume of poetry published jointly by the three Bronte sisters, Charlotte, Emily and Anne in 1846, and their first work to ever go in print. To evade contemporary prejudice against female writers, the Bronte sisters adopted androgynous first names. Marked by profound sentiments, gravity and melodious harmony, the poems are strewn on the fields of soulful love, rueful reminiscence and the immortal yearnings of a Christian soul, and represent a fragrant assemblage of noetic flowers from the glebes of olden England...

By: BS Murthy

Bhagvad-Gita: Treatise of Self-help by BS Murthy Bhagvad-Gita: Treatise of Self-help

The spiritual ethos and the philosophical outlook that the Bhagvad - Gita postulates paves the way for the liberation of man, who, as Rousseau said, ‘being born free, is everywhere in chains’. But equally it is a mirror of human psychology, which enables man to discern his debilities for appropriate redressal. All the same, the boon of an oral tradition that kept it alive for over two millennia became its bane with the proliferation of interpolations therein. Besides muddying its pristine philosophy, these insertions affect the sequential conformity and structural economy of the grand discourse...

By: C. J. Dennis (1876-1938)

The Glugs of Gosh by C. J. Dennis The Glugs of Gosh

First published in 1917, The Glugs of Gosh satirizes Australian life at the start of the twentieth century – but the absurdities it catalogs seem just as prevalent at the start of the twenty-first. The foolishness of kings, the arrogance of the elite, the gullibility of crowds, the pride of the self-righteous, the unthinking following of tradition – all find themselves the targets of C. J. Dennis’ biting wit.

The Songs of a Sentimental Bloke by C. J. Dennis The Songs of a Sentimental Bloke

The Songs of a Sentimental Bloke is a verse novel by Australian novelist and poet C. J. Dennis. The book sold over 60,000 copies in nine editions within the first year, and is probably one of the highest selling verse novels ever published in Australia.The novel tells the story of Bill, a larrikin of the Little Lonsdale Street Push, who is introduced to a young woman by the name of Doreen. The book chronicles their courtship and marriage, detailing Bill’s transformation from a violence-prone gang member to a contented husband and father. C.J. Dennis went on to publish three sequels to this novel: The Moods of Ginger Mick (1916), Doreen (1917) and Rose of Spadgers (1924)

Book cover Bill & Doreen's Courtship (Selections from "The Songs of a Sentimental Bloke")

"The Songs of a Sentimental Bloke" is a verse novel by Australian novelist and poet C. J. Dennis. The work was first published in book form in 1915 and sold over 60,000 copies in nine editions within the first year. A special pocket edition was even printed for the Australian soldiers in the trenches during the Great War. "The Songs of a Sentimental Bloke" tells the story of Bill, a larrikin of the Little Lonsdale Street push, who is introduced to a young woman by the name of Doreen. The book chronicles their courtship and marriage, detailing Bill's transformation from a violence-prone gang member to a contented husband and father. - Summary by Wikipedia


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