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By: Henry Mayhew (1812-1887)

Book cover London Labour and the London Poor Volume I

Subtitled, "A Cyclopaedia of the condition and earnings of those that will work, those that cannot work, and those that will not work." "The history of a people from the lips of the people themselves .. their labour, earnings, trials and sufferings, in their own unvarnished language, and to pourtray the condition of their homes and their families by personal observation of the places ..." "My earnest hope is that the book may serve to give the rich a more intimate knowledge of the sufferings, and the frequent heroism under those sufferings, of the poor ...

By: Francis Rolt-Wheeler (1876-1960)

Book cover Science - History of the Universe Vol. 5: Biology

Multi-volume work on science edited by Francis Rolt-Wheeler. The fifth volume is on Biology written by Caroline E. Stackpole. It discusses biology being the science of life and life’s nature and origins. It furthers explains functions and processes necessary for this life. It also covers evolution and factors that affect evolution. - Summary by Sienna

By: Bernard Le Bovier de Fontenelle (1657-1757)

Book cover Conversations on the Plurality of Worlds

This book is a popular science book written in the late 1600s. It is written as a series of conversations between a gallant philosopher and a countess, while walking in her garden and gazing at the stars. The philosopher explains the heliocentric model of the solar system and also muses on the possibility of extraterrestrial life. While it explains the heliocentric model, unlike other astronomy works of the time, it did not attract the attention of the Church.

By: Margaret Herschel (1810-1884)

Book cover Memoir and Correspondence of Caroline Herschel

For many people, the name Caroline Herschel will be unfamiliar, but she was one of the most significant women on the English scientific scene during the late 18th and early 19th century. Sister of the well known William Herschel , she first worked as his assistant in his astronomical works, and then went on to become a noted astronomer in her own right. She discovered eight new comets in her lifetime, and was the first woman to be paid for her contribution to science, and was awarded a Gold Medal...

By: Gertrude Chandler Warner (1890-1979)

Book cover Star Stories for Little Folks

Gertrude Chandler Warner, known mainly for her "Boxcar Children" series of mystery books, published this small book of Astronomy, Constellations, and the stories behind them in 1918. It follows the story of a little girl named Helen, and her friend Dr. Lorry as she learns about stars through stories, games, and more.

By: Harold Jacoby (1865-1932)

Book cover Practical Talks by an Astronomer

The present volume has not been designed as a systematic treatise on astronomy. There are many excellent books of that kind, suitable for serious students as well as the general reader; but they are necessarily somewhat dry and unattractive, because they must aim at completeness. Completeness means detail, and detail means dryness. But the science of astronomy contains subjects that admit of detached treatment; and as many of these are precisely the ones of greatest general interest, it has seemed well to select several, and describe them in language free from technicalities...

By: W. Mattieu Williams (1820-1892)

Book cover The Chemistry of Cookery

This book, written in the late 1800s, is a book of chemistry that explains the whys and hows of cooking to trained chefs and laymen alike. The book deals with some compounds of common foodstuffs, like albumen or gluten, and illustrates what happens from a chemist's point of view during certain types of food preparation like roasting, frying, or stewing. A part of the chapters also details adulterations of food - thankfully since outlawed - and how to detect them in the finished product.

By: George Wharton James (1858-1923)

Book cover What the White Race May Learn from the Indian

People learn from other people, and races have forever learned from other races. Herein we are treated to an in-depth understanding of categorized social characteristics of the Native American peoples, primarily those of the western U.S. as they existed at the time of book publication . 'In dealing with [the Native Americans] as a race, a people, therefore, I do as I would with my own race, I take what to me seem to be racial characteristics, or in other words, the things that are manifested in the lives of the best men and women, and which seem to represent their habitual aims, ambitions, and desires.' - Summary by Roger Melin & book foreword

By: Andress Small Floyd (1873-1933)

Book cover My Monks of Vagabondia

Before welfare or rehab, what happened to those unfortunates who lost their way, fell through the cracks, were cast off by society? Men such as Andress Floyd and his wife Lillian stepped up. In 1908, the philanthropists converted a mansion in New Jersey into a refuge for homeless men and during the more than 30 years of its operation, more than 100,000 men stayed there until they were able to get back on their feet. In this volume, Floyd has collected 13 diverse true tales of what brought some of the residents to seek succor and enlightenment at the Self-Mastery Colony. - Summary by Lynne Thompson

By: Various

Book cover Bomb: The 1945 Test of the First Atomic Bomb

These two publications put out by the U.S. government are about the Trinity site in New Mexico where in 1945 the first atomic bomb was tested. Each publication complements the other, though there is some duplication. These are descriptions of the test itself and of the planning and organization leading up to the test. They also tell what was done with the site after the test and how it became a national historic landmark. - Summary by david wales

By: Auguste Comte (1798-1857)

Book cover General View of Positivism

Auguste Comte was from France and published this book in French in 1844. He made a very great impact on the sciences and claims to have “discovered the principal laws of Sociology." Comte says Reason has become habituated to revolt but that doesn’t mean it will always retain its revolutionary character. He discusses Science, the trade-unions, Proletariat workers, Communists, Capitalists, Republicans, the role of woman in society, the elevation of Social Feeling over Self-love, and the Catholic Church in this book...

By: Dr. Benjamin Rush (1746-1813)

Book cover Inquiry into the Effects of Ardent Spirits upon the Human Body and Mind, with an Account of the Means of Preventing, and of the Remedies for Curing Them

Written when the United States extended only to the Mississippi River, by one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, this short work explores the physical, social, and mental effects of distilled liquors; the classes of people prone to intoxication by them; suggested drinks to use instead of them; and remedies for intoxication and for their habitual use. He takes a medical view of alcoholism, exploring the physical causes rather than blaming moral failure as the cause. Alcoholic drinks that are not distilled are viewed as wholesome drinks, and opium is suggested for pain as being without bad effects or addictive qualities.

By: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)

Book cover Theory of Colours

Newton's observations on the optical spectrum were widely accepted but Goethe noticed the difference between the scientific explanation and the phenomena as experienced by the human eye. He did not try to explain this, but rather collected and presented data, conducting experiments on the interplay of light and dark. His work was rejected as 'unscientific' by physicists but his color wheel is still used by artists today. - Summary by Lynne Thompson

By: Francis Rolt-Wheeler (1876-1960)

Book cover Science - History of the Universe Vol. 4: Chemistry

Multi-volume work on science edited by Francis Rolt-Wheeler. The fourth volume is on Chemistry written by William Allan Hamor. It discusses the development of chemical knowledge, from the ancients to modern times. It expanded further on the early works of alchemists and into the phlogistic period. The last chapters cover atomic theories and the development of organic and inorganic chemistry. - Summary by Sienna

By: Richard A. Proctor (1837-1888)

Book cover Light Science for Leisure Hours

In preparing these Essays, my chief object has been to present scientific truths in a light and readable form—clearly and simply, but with an exact adherence to the facts as I see them. I have followed—here and always—the rule of trying to explain my meaning precisely as I should wish others to explain, to myself, matters with which I was unfamiliar. Hence I have avoided that excessive simplicity which some seem to consider absolutely essential in scientific essays intended for general perusal, but which is often even more perplexing than a too technical style...

By: E. A. Wallis Budge (1857-1934)

Book cover Book of the Dead

The Egyptian Book of the Dead, or the Book of Coming Forth by Day, is an Ancient Egyptian funerary text consisting of spells to protect the soul on its journey to Duat, or Afterlife.

By: Richard Mead (1673-1754)

Book cover Short Discourse Concerning Pestilential Contagion, and the Methods to Be Used to Prevent It

This is a work written about the plague in France and how to prevent its spread. It is considered an important historical work for the understanding of transmittable diseases. - Summary by afutterer

By: Thomas W. Corbin

Book cover Marvels of Scientific Invention

This is a chronicle of the 19 most interesting inventions of the early 20th century. Some of the inventions are still in use and of considerable impact today, while others are examples of the strong belief in progress prevalent at the time would probably be frowned upon today. In this way, the author's account of how ice was made at the time will still be very interesting for readers today, but an account of how dynamite was going to be used in farming may be seen as humorous to the contemporary reader. The subjects are as varied as science herself is, and any reader and listener should find a subject matching his or her own taste. - Summary by Carolin

By: Mary Proctor (1862-1957)

Book cover Stories of Starland

Henry asks his sister Mary about the sky. She tells him all about the Sun, the Planets, the Moon, Comets and Meteors, and Stars. Mary tells her brother about mythologies people believed about the earth and sky along with true scientific information.

By: Charles Holder (1851-1915)

Book cover Half Hours With the Lower Animals

This book is devoted to the study of invertebrate animals. While most people associate the word "animal" with fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals, 90% of the animal species on earth are invertebrates, i.e., they have no backbone. Protozoans and invertebrate animals are found world-wide, from the bottom of the oceans to the the rain forests, ice caves, and our own back yards. Many invertebrates still reside in the oceans, while others dwell in our houses, back yards and gardens, in ponds and streams, and on the menus in seafood restaurants...

By: George Vivian Poore (1843-1904)

Book cover London (Ancient And Modern) From The Sanitary And Medical Point Of View

This little book is an expansion of two addresses delivered in January, 1889. One deals with sanitary issues in London. The other deals with medical issues, mainly through the lives and careers of physicians. Though ancients are included, the main emphasis is upon the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries. - Summary by Book Preface and David Wales

By: Sir Francis Galton (1822-1911)

Book cover Hereditary Genius

A biographical summary of the pre-eminent men of Britain grouped by profession. The extensive survey draws from information including college graduation, reputation during career, fellowships, and even known relatives. Includes discussions on findings and observations as well as referenced appendices. - Summary by Leon Harvey

By: Frank Allaben (1867-1927)

Book cover Concerning Genealogies

Written over a century ago, this comprehensive book offers insight into the methods used to research and compile a family history. As stated in the preface of the book, "Strong emphasis is laid upon the importance of employing the historical method..." which is sorely lacking in today's computerized compilations. - Summary by Roger Melin

By: Sir Charles Bright (1863-1937)

Book cover Story of the Atlantic Cable

The electric telegraph, together with the railway-train and the steamship, constituted the three most conspicuous features of late 19th century civilization. Indeed, it may be truly said that the harnessing electricity to the service of man for human communication has effected a change in political, commercial, and social relations, even more complete than that wrought by steam locomotion. This is the story of how the electric telegraph cable was laid across the floor of the Atlantic from Newfoundland to Ireland. - Summary by modified from the introduction

By: Julia Augusta Schwartz (1873-1957)

Book cover Wilderness Babies

This book tells the stories of some of the baby mammals of the wilderness,—how they grow and learn day by day to take care of themselves. In hollow trees or down under water among the lily leaves, in the cool sea or on the rugged mountains, on the grassy plains or among the waving tree-tops, in the dark caves and burrows or hidden in the tangles underfoot,—all the world is alive with young creatures. - Summary by introduction

By: Francis Rolt-Wheeler (1876-1960)

Book cover Science - History of the Universe Vol. 6: Zoology & Botany

Multi-volume work on science edited by Francis Rolt-Wheeler. The sixth volume is on Zoology written by Dr. WM. D. Matthew and on Botany written by Marion E. Latham. The section on Zoology examines the development, evolution and distribution of animals. It further discusses types of animals - invertebrates and vertebrates. The section on botany touched on early development of botany and delved on structures and reproduction of plants. Development of the study of morphology and plant cell anatomy and variations were also examined.

By: William Ruschenberger (1807-1895)

Book cover Elements of Anatomy and Physiology

The Elements of Anatomy and Physiology is one in a Series of First Books of Natural History Prepared for the Use of Schools and Colleges. This succinct little textbook from 1852 presents an introduction to the workings of the human body. The information, albeit not current, is still interesting and of use as a general overview of the subject as well as interesting look into the period. Please note that some of the information may have changed considerably since this time. The author was a surgeon in the U.S. Navy and president of the Academy of Natural Sciences. - Summary by A. Gramour

By: Archibald Williams (1871-1934)

Book cover Romance of Modern Invention

This is a volume of exploration into the newest inventions of the turn of the previous century. Journalist Archibald Williams walks the reader through diverse inventions which were changing the world at just that point in time. - Summary by Carolin

By: H. L. Mencken (1880-1956)

Book cover Prejudices, First Series

Mencken sharpens his pen and in a collection of short essays delivers acerbic opinions on issues and persons of the time. Among his targets in this volume are critics, H.G. Wells Thorstein Veblen, Arnold Bennett, William Dean Howells, Irvin S. Cobb. Mencken's critiques are delivered against a background of his own well known ethnic, racial, religious, and sectional prejudices. Not for the faint of heart, Mencken's prickly, yet unapologetic, prose reveals a window into American attitudes at the time they were written and their influences on the larger American culture. - Summary by DrPGould

By: Earl W. Phelan (1900-1993)

Book cover Radioisotopes in Medicine

Radioisotopes in Medicine is an educational booklet published in 1966 as part of the Understanding the Atom series by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Written in clear language for the general public, the booklet covers the diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radioactive isotopes like technetium 99m and iodine 131.

By: Jean M. Thompson

Book cover Water Wonders Every Child Should Know

Water: essential for life and in much of the world, we take it for granted. In this work, Jean Thompson explains various aspects of the water cycle in simple terms, for the benefit of young readers with enquiring minds. Listeners are referred to the text for the microphotographs described.

By: Marion Harland (1830-1922)

Book cover Marion Harland's Complete Etiquette

Haven't you always wondered how to properly accept a formal dinner invitation? Perhaps you have a débutante under your wing, in which case you need to make sure her appearance in society goes perfectly, to increase her chances of a brilliant match. And what exactly would be your duties as her chaperon? These and many other questions are expertly answered by Marion Harland in this little volume. - Summary by Carolin

By: Edmund Christopherson (1903-1974)

Book cover Night The Mountain Fell; The Story Of The Montana-Yellowstone Earthquake

A severe earthquake, centered in the vacation area of West Yellowstone, Montana, shook the ground and its inhabitants and visitors on August 17, 1959, at 11.37 pm. A mountainside fell, a lake formed, roads and houses disappeared, people were trapped, people died. The author of this narrative went to the area the day after the quake, took first-hand stories of the catastrophe, researched in the following months, and wrote this account within a year of the shaking. The printed source has many informative photographs. - Summary by David Wales

By: US Comm. for the Global Atmospheric Research Program

Book cover Understanding Climatic Change

Understanding Climatic Change - A Program for Action is a 1975 report by the US Committee for the Global Atmospheric Research Program. Already at this time, it was understood that a climate change was taking place, and that it was possibly happening due to human influences. The report gives an overview of past climates, a projection of future climate; it talks about state-of-the-art simulations and lays out a plan for future research and action.

By: Henry Mayhew (1812-1887)

Book cover London Labour and the London Poor Volume II

Subtitled, "A Cyclopaedia of the condition and earnings of those that will work, those that cannot work, and those that will not work." "The history of a people from the lips of the people themselves .. their labour, earnings, trials and sufferings, in their own unvarnished language, and to pourtray the condition of their homes and their families by personal observation of the places ..." "My earnest hope is that the book may serve to give the rich a more intimate knowledge of the sufferings, and the frequent heroism under those sufferings, of the poor ...

By: John Dewey (1859-1952)

Book cover Human Nature And Conduct - Part 1, The Place of Habit in Conduct

John Dewey, an early 20th Century American philosopher, psychologist, educational theorist saw Social Psychology as much a physical science as Biology and Chemistry. This project encompasses Part 1 of 4 of his book Human Nature and Conduct. Dewey's uses the word "HABIT" as a specialized catch-all word to describe how a person and his/her objective environment interact. This interaction is the basis for moral judgement. Dewey writes: "All habits are demands for certain kinds of activity; and they constitute the self.” In other places he also asserts that "Habits are Will." - Summary by William Jones, Soloist

By: Bernhard Eduard Fernow (1851-1923)

Book cover Brief History of Forestry

An accessible, comprehensive summary of the science and art of forestry, from its ancient roots to its 20th century techniques . This book synthesizes forestry efforts and practices from around the globe, providing the reader with unique lens into the sociocultural, historic and, of course, economic processes of nearly every world region.

By: Jean-Henri Fabre (1823-1915)

Book cover Insect Adventures

This book is composed of selections from Alexander Teixeira de Mattos’ Translation of Fabre’s “Souvenirs Entomologiques,” retold for children. It's made up of first-person narratives, and using his exceptional observation skills, gives us a close-up peep into the world of insects, including bees, wasps, worms, beetles, moths, and spiders, to name a few. When Fabre first published this work, as the Preface indicates, he was criticized by some scientists in his field for writing a scientific book that was "too interesting." - Summary by Devorah Allen

By: Paolo Mantegazza (1831-1910)

Book cover Book of Love

Translated from Italian, it delves into the physiology of love from a scientific standpoint, in beautiful writing.

By: Various

Book cover Volcanoes and Vulcanology (1885-1917)

This is a collection of short scientific articles on the study of volcanoes and related seismic activity published in Knowledge, A Monthly Record of Science between 1884-1917 - Summary by J. M. Smallheer

By: Agnes Arber (1879-1960)

Book cover Herbals, Their Origin and Evolution: A Chapter in the History of Botany

Eminent British botanist Agnes Arber provides an authoritative history of printed Herbals -- books widely used in early modern Europe to catalogue the uses of different kinds of plants. While Herbals often reflected pre-scientific and magical beliefs about the properties of plants, Arber's work reveals that they were also critical to the early development of botany and medicine as empirical sciences. A classic in the history of science. - Summary by Josh Leach

By: P. T. Barnum (1810-1891)

Book cover Struggles and Triumphs, or Forty Years' of Recollections of P.T. Barnum, written by Himself

The 1873 edition of the autobiography of the founding genius of the "Greatest Show on Earth," P.T. Barnum. It details his life and business struggles up to the year 1872. Not only a showman and a museum operator, but an antislavery politician, Connecticut state legislator, Mayor of Bridgeport, Connecticut, and temperance lecturer, Barnum lays aside some of the gilding to provide his thoughts on his career, economics, how to make money, and other issues of the day. - Summary by DrPGould

By: Charles Babbage (1791-1871)

Book cover Passages from the Life of a Philosopher

Some men write their lives to save themselves from ennui, careless of the amount they inflict on their readers. Others write their personal history, lest some kind friend should survive them, and, in showing off his own talent, unwittingly show them up. Others, again, write their own life from a different motive—from fear that the vampires of literature might make it their prey. I have frequently had applications to write my life, both from my countrymen and from foreigners. Some caterers for the public offered to pay me for it...

By: Asa Gray (1810-1888)

Book cover Natural Science and Religion

Asa Gray was a highly-regarded botanist at Harvard University and a friend and collaborator of Charles Darwin. As a Christian, Gray was concerned with the disconnect developing through the nineteenth century between the growing understanding of the natural world and the traditional worldview assumed by orthodox Christianity. This book presents two lectures he gave to theology students at Yale College in which he argues that a disconnect is not inevitable, but that a Christian perspective can and should incorporate current understanding of the world provided by natural science. - Summary by BarryGanong

By: Nicolas-Joseph Thiéry de Menonville (1739-1780)

Book cover Travels to Oaxaca

Botanical Piracy! A French botanist plots to steal red dye cochineal insects from Spanish Mexico and transplant them and their cacti hosts to the French Caribbean. The year is 1776. Nicolas-Joseph Thiéry de Menonville is a fast talker and a quick thinker. Botanist and physician by training, he insinuates his way from Port-au-Prince, first to Havana and then to the Mexican mainland on the ruse that he is searching for a botanical cure for gout. In Vera Cruz, however, his passport is confiscated, and the Viceroy orders him to leave Mexico on the first available ship...

By: Aristotle (384 BCE-322 BCE)

Book cover On the Parts of Animals

On the Parts of Animals by Aristotle . The first book asks whether animals were designed or came into existence by chance. The remaining three books focus on particular examples of various animals and the functions of their organs. The translator William Ogle, who was both a medical doctor and classicist, presented Charles Darwin with a copy of this translation.

By: T. W. H. Crosland

Book cover Wild Irishman

History and customs of the Irish and Ireland. A word of warning to the listener: The Wild Irishman contains the biased, uncomplimentary opinions of Englishman, Thomas Crosland. Remember this was written in the late 1800's and published in 1905. Crosland was hyper critical of Irishmen and women at a time when American cities often posted signs, "No Irish Need Apply." If you are Irish, as am I, try to not be overly offended or simply walk away. - Summary by John Brandon

By: Frederic Lucas (1852-1929)

Book cover Animals of the Past

Prior to the emergence of paleontology and comparative anatomy as scientific disciplines at the end of the 18th century, it was generally known that there were species of animals that had disappeared completely. The term "extinction" originally applied to the extinguishing of fires or erasing of one's debt. It was not until 1784 that the term extinction was used to denote the complete eradication of a species of living being. In 1901, Frederic A. Lucas penned an overview of vertebrate animals whose only evidence of being remained in fossil records. The book focuses primarily on vertebrate animals, from fish to mammals. - Summary by Jeffery Smith

By: Hester Lynch Piozzi (1741-1821)

Book cover Glimpses of Italian society in the eighteenth century

Selections from the "Observations and reflections made in the course of a journey through France, Italy, and Germany" by Hester Lynch Piozzi who, during her first marriage to Henry Thrale, was the hostess and friend of many of her famous contemporaries including Dr Johnson and Fanny Burney. The vivid and personal "Observations and Reflections" was first published in 1789. - Summary by barbara2

By: George Frederick Kunz (1856-1932)

Book cover Curious Lore of Precious Stones

Full title is "The Curious Lore of Precious Stones, being a description of their sentiments and folklore, superstitions, symbolism, mysticism, use in medicine, protection, prevention, religion, and divination, crystal gazing, birthstones, lucky stones, and talismans, astral, zodiacal, and planetary." Just about everything you ever wanted to know about precious stones, aside from their formation, acquisition, and chemical composition. - Summary by TriciaG

By: Harry Chase Brearley (1870-1940)

Book cover Time Telling Through the Ages

A history of timekeeping from the stone age through to American mass production, covering timepieces from the sundial and water clock through the key inventions driving advances in the accuracy of clocks and watches in both Europe and America. The book was conceived and sponsored by the Ingersoll Family as a celebration of their then 25 years of watchmaking. - Summary by Chris Cartwright

By: Sir Francis Galton (1822-1911)

Book cover Inquiries into Human Faculty and its Development

Francis Galton, credited with the discovery of identification by fingerprinting, also took a long term interest in the study of biometrics. In this book, many different faculties, both observable and measurable are discussed in length and methods of collecting data suggested. In addition, casual observations from personal memoirs, and drawing similar cases from other reputable sources are also compared. A wide variety of topics are mentioned, including differences in appearance within family members, to subtle habits and emotional responses comparing humans and animals are mentioned in a series of chapter length essays. - Summary by Leon Harvey

By: William Hanna Thomson (1833-1918)

Book cover Brain and Personality, or the Physical Relations of the Brain to the Mind

One of the earlier works on brain science, relating what was then known or conjectured about the connection between the physical brain and the individual personality, including the ability of speech and language. As this is an early work , some of the information related is, of course, outdated; but much of it is still relevant today.

By: Herbert Mayo (1796-1852)

Book cover Popular Superstitions, and the Truths Contained Therein

"In the following Letters I have endeavoured to exhibit in their true light the singular natural phenomena of which old superstition and modern charlatanism in turn availed themselves—to indicate their laws, and to develop their theory." In 14 letters, British physiologist Herbert Mayo is giving the reader an overview of popular superstitions of previous times, like vampirism, somnambulism or even ghost sightings, and exposing how in previous times they were treated with fear, ignorance and intolerance, often leading to crime, while he endeavours to give rational explanations for the phenomena with the goal to find treatments and cures for the afflicted. - Summary by Sonia

By: US Global Change Research Program

Book cover Fourth National Climate Assessment, Volume II: Impacts, Risks and Adaption in the United States

Are you interested in learning about climate change and its current and future effects on the United States? The Fourth National Climate Assessment – Volume II is a 2018 report written in non-technical language by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, a panel of independent experts, as mandated by the Global Change Research Act of 1990. This report focuses on the human welfare, societal, and environmental elements of climate change and variability in the U.S., with particular attention paid to observed and projected risks and impacts...

By: John Kenlon (1861-1940)

Book cover Fires and Fire-Fighters

John Kenlon became a New York City firefighter in 1887, and was appointed Fire Chief in 1911. In 1913, he wrote this authoritative book surveying the history of fire-fighting from ancient Rome to 20th-century New York. The first part of the book explores the evolution of fire-fighting techniques in various countries and the development of equipment and organization, and describes several famous historical fires and how they were fought. The remainder of the book discusses in greater detail some particular types of fires confronting an urban fire department in 1913, such as hotel, theater, factory, hospital, and school fires, sea port fires, and skyscraper fires...

By: Thomas Southwood Smith (1788-1831)

Book cover Use Of The Dead To The Living

In 1827 Thomas Southwood-Smith published The Use of the Dead to the Living, a pamphlet which argued that the current system of burial in the United Kingdom was a wasteful use of bodies that could otherwise be used for dissection by the medical profession. "If, by any appropriation of the dead, I can promote the happiness of the living, then it is my duty to conquer the reluctance I may feel to such a disposition of the dead, however well-founded or strong that reluctance may be". Southwood-Smith's lobbying helped lead to the 1832 Anatomy Act, the legislation which allowed the state to seize unclaimed corpses from workhouses and sell them to surgical schools...

By: Isaac Asimov (1920-1992)

Book cover Worlds Within Worlds: The Story of Nuclear Energy, Volumes 1-3

This is a short booklet on science fact commissioned by the U. S. Energy Research and Development Administration . It tells the story of the origins of nuclear physics in terms understandable to an audience with minimal technical background. What were the steps through history - the discoveries that built upon one another - from alchemy to chemistry, physics, astronomy, mathematics, and quantum mechanics, that led to our understanding and harnessing nuclear energy? Asimov was a great writer of both science fact and fiction who wrote or edited more than 500 books, published in 9 of the 10 major categories of the Dewey Decimal Classification.

By: Meriel Buchanan (1886-1959)

Book cover Recollections of Imperial Russia

In this memoir, Meriel Buchanan links the history of Russia to powerful, lingering memories of her years living there. She was the daughter of the man who turned out to be the last British ambassador to Imperial Russia. As a young adult, in her role as the ambassador’s daughter, she had regular access to the court of Tsar Nicholas II of Russia, providing her with unusual experiences and impressions. She describes first hand the sights, sounds, and some of the activities she remembers from this elevated and sheltered vantage point. The family left Russia in 1918, and the author’s memories are filled with nostalgia and longing for the Russia she experienced. - Summary by Jan M.

By: Pliny the Elder (23-79)

Book cover Boys' and Girls' Pliny Vol. 1

The Natural History of Pliny the Elder is one of the largest single works to have survived from the Roman Empire. The full work consists of 37 books, covering more than 20.000 topics ranging from astronomy and mathematics to botany and precious stones. The book became a model for later encyclopaedias and gives a fascinating overview of the state of scientific knowledge almost 2000 years ago. This version of the Natural History has been adapted for a younger audience. This first volume contains Book I and Book II out of a total of 9 books.


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