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By: Dale Carnegie (1888-1955)

The Art of Public Speaking by Dale Carnegie The Art of Public Speaking

A great start to shaking off public speaking jitters, socializing and mastering the art of small talk. The principles of public speaking written by Dale Carnegie decades ago in this book are timeless. They are just as effective in working a crowd in today’s society as they were back then. He delves into ways of commanding and charming an audience with the right energy, tone of voice, pitch, pronunciation and vocabulary. Armed with the principles highlighted in this book, you can do more than convey a message to a group of people, you can move them...

By: Dallas McCord Reynolds (1917-1983)

Book cover Status Quo

Larry Woolford is a government agent, tasked with investigating subversive activity. He does everything an ambitious young man should do if he wants to succeed: wear the right clothes, listen to the right music, even drink vodka martinis. Then he stumbles across a conspiracy of Weirds plotting to overthow the entire existing social order. It's a race against time. Can he stop their fiendish plan, and keep America safe for shallow judgements based on status symbols? Status Quo was nominated for the 1962 Hugo Award for short fiction.

Book cover 5 Science Fiction Stories by Mac Reynolds

Five early stories by one of my favorite SF writers, Mack Reynolds. Medal of Honor is an intriguing look into the mind of someone who is above the law; who cannot commit a crime. How will he act? especially if he is a self centered drunk? Potential Enemy is story about the sad state of human minds that are ruled by fear and paranoia. Happy Ending is an SF story about the far future when the last solar system wide dictator has been finally defeated and what will he do? What will he do? This is also an exploration of mental megalomania and it's effects...

By: Dame Rose Macaulay (1881-1958)

Mystery at Geneva: An Improbable Tale of Singular Happenings by Dame Rose Macaulay Mystery at Geneva: An Improbable Tale of Singular Happenings

Henry Beechtree, a newspaper correspondent for the British Bolshevist, is covering the latest otherwise sleepy session of the League of Nations in Geneva, when the newly elected President – a member of the Norwegian delegation – disappears mysteriously, adding some badly needed ‘spice’ to Henry's assignment. (Introduction by Cathy Barratt)

By: Dame Shirley (d.1906)

The Shirley Letters from California Mines in 1851-52 by Dame Shirley The Shirley Letters from California Mines in 1851-52

Louise Amelia Knapp Smith Clappe moved to California from Massachusetts during the Gold Rush of the mid-1800’s. During her travels, Louise was offered the opportunity to write for The Herald about her travel adventures. It was at this point that Louise chose the name “Shirley” as her pen name. Dame Shirley wrote a series of 23 letters to her sister Mary Jane (also known as Molly) in Massachusetts in 1851 and 1852. The “Shirley Letters”, as the collected whole later became known, gave true accounts of life in two gold mining camps on the Feather River in the 1850s...

By: Dandin (6th Century)

Book cover Twenty Two Goblins

These 22 stories are told by the Goblin to the King Vikram. King Vikram faces many difficulties in bringing the vetala to the tantric. Each time Vikram tries to capture the vetala, it tells a story that ends with a riddle. If Vikram cannot answer the question correctly, the vampire consents to remain in captivity. If the king answers the question correctly, the vampire would escape and return to his tree. In some variations, the king is required to speak if he knows the answer, else his head will burst...

Hindoo Tales or the Adventures of Ten Princes by Dandin Hindoo Tales or the Adventures of Ten Princes

This book describes the adventures of ten Kumaras, i.e., young men, (all of whom are either princes or sons of royal ministers), as narrated by the men themselves. These narratives are replete with accounts of demigods, ghosts, gamblers, intrigues with voluptious women, astonishing coincidences, cockfights, anthropophagy, sorcery, robberies, murders and wars.

By: Daniel A. Lord (1888-1955)

Red Arrows in the Night by Daniel A. Lord Red Arrows in the Night

The Scarlet Archer of Agincourt is claimed by the Erkenwold’s as their family ghost. Tradition held that the death of an important Erkenwold was always heralded by the apparition of the Scarlet Archer. Now in the early years of WWII, the archer has made an appearance on the family estate on the US coast. Is it a ghost or something more sinister, and what does he or she want?This mystery novel was written by Daniel A Lord, S.J., who was a popular American Catholic writer. The subjects of the works in his bibliography range from religion, humor, plays, songs, mysteries and even politics...

Murder in the Sacristy by Daniel A. Lord Murder in the Sacristy

A sacristan is found murdered in the sacristy and the safe robbed of valuable jewels. All clues seem to point to the priest as the murderer. But is the priest the guilty party - or is it the communist - the nazi - the Senator's wife - or someone else?This mystery novel, set in World War II Chicago, was written by Daniel A Lord, S.J., who was a priest and popular American Catholic writer. The subjects of the works in his bibliography range from religion, humor, plays, songs, mysteries and even politics. His most influential work was possibly in drafting the 1930 Production Code for motion pictures. (Introduction by Maria Therese)

Book cover Clouds Cover the Campus

On an American college campus, in the early years of World War II, a professor from Germany is murdered and the plans for a new bomb sight he had invented are missing. Who murdered the professor and stole the plans? And are the accidents, happening with alarming frequency to young student aviators from the campus, really accidents -- or is some unknown conspiracy afoot?This mystery novel was written by Daniel A Lord, S.J., a priest and popular American Catholic writer. The subjects of the works in his bibliography range from religion, humor, plays, songs, mysteries and even politics. His most influential work was possibly in drafting the 1930 Production Code for motion pictures. (

By: Daniel Defoe (1659-1731)

Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe Robinson Crusoe

Robinson Crusoe is perhaps the most famous castaway of all time. Whilst many of us have not read Defoe’s iconic book, Robinson Crusoe is a character that is familiar to us all. Aided by the hundreds of movies and theatre productions that the book spurned, Crusoe is a household name. Credited with being the first "real fiction" book, this fictional autobiography tells the tale of a young man who found himself shipwrecked on a remote island for 28 years. The story is said to be based on the dramatic life of Alexander Selkirk, a Scottish castaway who lived alone for four years on a Pacific island...

Robinson Crusoe Written Anew for Children by Daniel Defoe Robinson Crusoe Written Anew for Children

First published in 1719, Robinson Crusoe is a book that marks the beginning of realistic fiction writing in English. Its simple, linear narrative style and the semblance of being a true account and autobiographical in nature led to its great popularity when it first came out. Its original title The Life and Strange Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe of York: Mariner, Who Lived Eight and Twenty Years all alone in an Uninhabited Island on the Coast of America, Near the Mouth of the Great...

The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders by Daniel Defoe The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders

A woman in prison awaiting a death sentence is given a reprieve because she is pregnant. She migrates to America abandoning the baby to the care of a foster mother. The child, a girl, grows up and begins working as a servant in a wealthy household. Here she is pursued by the two sons of the house and ultimately marries the younger one. When he dies, leaving her with two young children to look after, she begins a life of deception and confidence trickery which ends in great tragedy and disgrace. In her old age, events take a less tragic turn and her redemption comes from sources she least expects...

The History of the Plague in London by Daniel Defoe The History of the Plague in London

The History of the Plague in London is a historical novel offering an account of the dismal events caused by the Great Plague, which mercilessly struck the city of London in 1665. First published in 1722, the novel illustrates the social disorder triggered by the outbreak, while focusing on human suffering and the mere devastation occupying London at the time. Defoe opens his book with the introduction of his fictional character H.F., a middle-class man who decides to wait out the destruction of the plague instead of fleeing to safety, and is presented only by his initials throughout the novel...

The Further Adventures of Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe The Further Adventures of Robinson Crusoe

“THE FARTHER ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE; Being the Second and Last Part OF HIS LIFE, And of the Strange Surprizing Accounts of his Travels Round three Parts of the Globe.” After the death of his wife, Robinson Crusoe is overcome by the old wanderlust, and sets out with his faithful companion Friday to see his island once again. Thus begins a journey which will last ten years and nine months, in which Crusoe travels over the world, along the way facing dangers and discoveries in Madagascar, China, and Siberia.

The Life, Adventures & Piracies of Captain Singleton by Daniel Defoe The Life, Adventures & Piracies of Captain Singleton

The Life, Adventures & Piracies of the Famous Captain Singleton is a "bipartite adventure story whose first half covers a traversal of Africa, and whose second half taps into the contemporary fascination with piracy. It has been commended for its depiction of the homosexual relationship between the eponymous hero and his religious mentor, the Quaker, William Walters.".

Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress by Daniel Defoe Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress

The full title of the novel is Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress Or, a History of the Life and Vast Variety of Fortunes of Mademoiselle de Beleau, Afterwards Called the Countess de Wintselsheim. The novel concerns the story of an unnamed "fallen woman", the second time Defoe created such a character (the first was a similar female character in Moll Flanders). In Roxana, a woman who takes on various pseudonyms, including "Roxana," describes her fall from wealth thanks to abandonment by a "fool" of a husband and movement into prostitution upon his abandonment. Roxana moves up and down through the social spectrum several times.

Book cover Robinson Crusoe in Words of One Syllable (Version 2)

This book is a fictional autobiography of the title character — a castaway who spends 28 years on a remote tropical island near Trinidad, encountering cannibals, captives, and mutineers before being rescued. You know the story; but do you know the story told in words of one syllable? Here Lucy Aikin under the pen name of Mary Godolphin retells Daniel Defoe's famous tale of danger and solitude and resourcefulness. Because of the simpler words, this might be a good book for listeners where English is not their first language. By Lucy Aikin and Daniel Defoe.

Book cover Storm

The Storm (1704) holds a special place in the writings of Daniel Defoe. Widely considered a founding document of modern journalism, The Storm narrates the calamitous events of November 1703 that are framed by the author in the first four chapters. These are followed by verbatim eyewitness accounts, solicited from survivors through a newspaper advertisement that Defoe placed shortly after the hurricane struck. Defoe is primarily known for his later fiction, loosely based on historical calamities, such as his Journal of the Plague Year (1722), and by fictionalized novels purporting to be first-person accounts, including Robinson Crusoe (1719) and Moll Flanders (1722)...

By: Daniel G. Brinton (1837-1899)

The Myths of the New World by Daniel G. Brinton The Myths of the New World

The Myths of the New World's full title describes it as.. " a treatise on the Symbolism and Mythology of the Red Race of America", an attempt to analyse and correlate scientifically, the mythology of the American Indians. Note: Brinton advocated theories of scientific racism that were pervasive at that time.

By: Dante Alighieri (1265-1321)

The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri The Divine Comedy

The Divine Comedy (Italian: Commedia, later christened “Divina” by Giovanni Boccaccio), written by Dante Alighieri between 1308 and his death in 1321, is widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, the last great work of literature of the Middle Ages and the first great work of the Renaissance. A culmination of the medieval world-view of the afterlife, it establishes the Tuscan dialect in which it is written as the Italian standard, and is seen as one of the greatest works of world literature...

Book cover Canzoniere

Le Rime (in English, The Rhymes) are the collection of lyric poems written by Dante Alighieri throughout his life. While the rest of Dante's works were prepared by himself for publication, these poems were written by him in letters, as parts of other works or independently, but only collected and ordered much later, by modern critics. Among these is found the famous collection of Rime Petrose, a cycle of poems dedicated to a woman nicknamed Pietra (Stone) due to her insensibility to the poet's love. As the work of a whole life, the poems are varied, and mirror the many different moments of Dante's thoughts, both poetically and philosophically.

Book cover Divine Comedy (version 2 Dramatic Reading)

The Divine Comedy (in Italian, Divina Commedia, or just La commedia or Comedia) is an epic poem written by Dante Alighieri in the first decades of the 14th Century, during his exile from his native Florence. Considered the most important work of Italian literature, the poem has also has enormous historical influence on western literature and culture more generally. Dante represents the three realms of the afterlife in his three canticles (Inferno--Hell; Purgatorio--Purgatory; Paradiso--Paradise) in a way that reflects and, at the same time, goes beyond Christian tradition of the 14th Century...

Book cover New Life (La vita nuova)

One of Dante's earliest works, La vita nuova or La vita nova (The New Life) is in a prosimetrum style, a combination of prose and verse, and tells the story of his youthful love for Beatrice. The prose creates the illusion of narrative continuity between the poems; it is Dante's way of reconstructing himself and his art in terms of his evolving sense of the limitations of courtly love (the system of ritualized love and art that Dante and his poet-friends inherited from the Provençal poets, the Sicilian poets of the court of Frederick II, and the Tuscan poets before them)...

Book cover Epistolae, the letters of Dante

This volume contains the thirteen letters of the poet Dante Alighieri translated from their original Latin, including the famous and controversial letter to his patron Cangrande della Scala. The letters provide a good deal of context for the reader of Dante regarding his political and philosophical positions. In the final letter, the authenticity of which has been hotly contested by scholars, the author dedicates the Paradiso to the Veronese Cangrande, explains his Divine Comedy's title (then just Comedy), and discusses much of the work's content.

Book cover Vulgari Eloquentia

De vulgari eloquentia (On Eloquence in the vernacular) is a short essay written by Dante Alighieri in Latin. The work remains incomplete; only one and a half books are extant. It is believed to have been composed during Dante's exile, probably at some point between 1302 and 1305. The work revolves around the relationship between Latin and vernacular, and the need for a literary language, with an excourse on the poetic forms in vernacular.

Book cover Convivio

Convivio (The Banquet) is a work written by Dante Alighieri roughly between 1304 and 1307. This unfinished work of Dante consists of four trattati, or "books": a prefatory one, plus three books that each include a canzone (long lyrical poem) and a prose allegorical interpretation or commentary of the poem that goes off in multiple thematic directions. The Convivio is a kind of vernacular encyclopedia of the knowledge of Dante's time; it touches on many areas of learning, not only philosophy but also politics, linguistics, science, and history...

Book cover Monarchia

The De Monarchia is one of the main works by Dante Alighieri. It is a treatise on secular and religious power, and more specifically on the relationship between secular authority (represented by the Holy Roman Emperor) and religious authority (represented by the Pope). The work is composed of three books, in which Dante condemns the theocratic conception of the power elaborated by the Roman Church and defends that both the Pope and the Emperor derive their power from God, and, that being so, God gave to each power in one certain area of life, which means they should not interfere with each other's power and one should not be considered above the other.

By: Dave Stanley

Book cover There's Laughter in the Air! Radio's Top Comedians and Their Best Shows

There's Laughter in the Air takes readers on a sidesplitting romp through the world of old-time radio comedy. It gives a brief history of the medium and brief but intimate accounts of some of the biggest acts from the 1930s and 1940s. Gaver and Stanley give insight on several luminaries from the days of vintage radio: Jack Benny, Fred Allen, Fibber McGee and Molly, Burns and Allen, Amos 'n Andy, and more!

By: David Barrows

A History of the Philippines by David Barrows A History of the Philippines

This book is one of the earliest studies of Philippine history by an American scholar. In preparation for this book, the author conducted ethnological studies of indiginous island tribes after the American war in the Philippines. Since this book was intended for the Philippine reader, the author nicely places the history of the Islands into the broader context of European and American history.

By: David Belasco (1853-1931)

Book cover Return of Peter Grimm

By: David Brewster (1781-1868)

Book cover Martyrs of Science, or, the Lives of Galileo, Tycho Brahe, and Kepler

“The martyrs of Science” gives a brief biography of Galileo, Brahe and Kepler. These three men played a pivotal role in the scientific revolution during the early modern period. This book throws light upon their lives, their scientific achievements, adversities which they faced for their work and how they transformed the lives of the future generations forever. It also provides evidence which establishes that the work carried out by them are original irrespective of the claims by other men who tried in vain to rob them of their honor. The author highlights some of their fallacies which hindered their progress.


Page 52 of 99   
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