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A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Volume 4, part 3: James Knox Polk   By: (1843-1914)

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A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents Volume 4, part 3: James Knox Polk by James D. Richardson is an extensive collection of primary source documents from the presidency of James K. Polk, providing readers with insight into the political climate and key events of the time. The book offers a comprehensive look at Polk's presidency, including his handling of the Mexican-American War, the annexation of Texas, and the Oregon boundary dispute. Richardson's meticulous research and organization of the materials make this volume a valuable resource for scholars and history enthusiasts alike. Overall, this book serves as a valuable contribution to the study of American history and the presidency of James K. Polk.

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A COMPILATION OF THE MESSAGES AND PAPERS OF THE PRESIDENTS

BY JAMES D. RICHARDSON

James K. Polk

March 4, 1845, to March 4, 1849

James K. Polk

JAMES KNOX POLK was born in Mecklenburg County, N.C., November 2, 1795. He was a son of Samuel Polk, a farmer, whose father, Ezekiel, and his brother, Colonel Thomas Polk, one of the signers of the Mecklenburg Declaration of Independence, were sons of Robert Polk (or Pollock), who was born in Ireland and emigrated to America. His mother was Jane, daughter of James Knox, a resident of Iredell County, N.C., and a captain in the War of the Revolution. His father removed to Tennessee in the autumn of 1806, and settled in the valley of Duck River, a tributary of the Tennessee, in a section that was erected the following year into the county of Maury; he died in 1827. James was brought up on the farm; was inclined to study, and was fond of reading. He was sent to school, and had succeeded in mastering the English branches when ill health compelled his removal. Was then placed with a merchant, but, having a strong dislike to commercial pursuits, soon returned home, and in July, 1813, was given in charge of a private tutor. In 1815 entered the sophomore class at the University of North Carolina. As a student he was correct, punctual, and industrious... Continue reading book >>


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