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Travels in Arabia; comprehending an account of those territories in Hedjaz which the Mohammedans regard as sacred   By: (1784-1817)

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Travels in Arabia; comprehending an account of those territories in Hedjaz which the Mohammedans regard as sacred by John Lewis Burckhardt is a captivating literary masterpiece that takes readers on an extraordinary journey through the heart of Arabia, providing a remarkable and insightful glimpse into the sacred lands held dear by Muslims worldwide.

John Lewis Burckhardt, an intrepid Swiss traveler and explorer, embarks on a daring expedition to the Arabian Peninsula in the early 19th century. In his account, he presents a vivid and enlightening narrative that explores the cultural, geographical, and historical significance of the regions he visits.

From the opening pages, Burckhardt's meticulous attention to detail and meticulous research are evident, painting a rich tapestry of the Arabian landscape. Through his eloquent prose, readers are transported to the vibrant cities, vast deserts, and sacred sites of Hedjaz, a region imbued with deep spiritual reverence for the Islamic world.

Burckhardt's encounters with the local inhabitants provide invaluable insights into the customs, traditions, and way of life of the people he encounters. His deep respect and appreciation for the culture and religion of the land ensure that his observations are infused with an empathetic and unbiased lens, allowing readers to fully immerse themselves in the world he describes.

Moreover, Burckhardt's attention to historical context adds another layer of depth to the narrative. He frequently delves into the history of the region, weaving together tales of ancient civilizations and the birth of Islam. By intertwining the present with the past, the author provides a comprehensive understanding of the landscapes and structures that now stand as symbols of religious devotion.

One of the most remarkable aspects of this book is the author's courage and determination. Undertaking such a perilous journey during a time when the Arabian Peninsula remained largely unexplored by Westerners speaks volumes about Burckhardt's intrepid spirit. His determination to uncover the mysteries and sacred customs of the region is inspiring and serves to captivate readers further.

Travels in Arabia is not merely a travelogue; it is a literary treasure that offers both a geographical exploration and an insightful examination of religious and cultural significance. Burckhardt's masterful storytelling and evocative descriptions make for an engaging read, drawing readers in with every turn of the page.

In conclusion, John Lewis Burckhardt's Travels in Arabia; comprehending an account of those territories in Hedjaz which the Mohammedans regard as sacred is an exceptional work of literature that stands the test of time. Through his immersive descriptions, meticulous research, and deep respect for the region, Burckhardt creates a captivating narrative that transports readers to the heart of Arabia, allowing them to experience the richness and sacredness of the lands cherished by Muslims globally.

First Page:

[p.iii] TRAVELS IN ARABIA

COMPREHENDING

AN ACCOUNT OF THOSE TERRITORIES IN HEDJAZ WHICH THE MOHAMMEDANS REGARD AS SACRED.

BY THE LATE

JOHN LEWIS BURCKHARDT

PUBLISHED BY AUTHORITY OF THE ASSOCIATION FOR PROMOTING THE DISCOVERY OF THE INTERIOR OF AFRICA

LONDON : HENRY COLBURN, NEW BURLINGTON STREET, 1829.

[p.v] PREFACE OF THE EDITOR.

SOME years have now elapsed since two distinct portions of Burckhardt's works (his Travels in Nubia and Syria) were offered to the public, and most favourably received; their success being insured not only by instrinsic merit, but by the celebrity of their editor as a scholar and antiquary, a traveller and a geographer. It must not however be inferred, from any delay in publishing the present volume, that its contents are less worthy of notice than those parts which have already proved so interesting and instructive to a multitude of readers. It was always intended that this Journal, and other writings of the same lamented author, should issue successively from the press: "There still remain," says Colonel Leake, in his Preface to the Syrian Journal (p. ii.) "manuscripts sufficient to fill two volumes: one of these will consist of his Travels in Arabia, which were confined to the Hedjaz or Holy Land of the Muselmans, the part least accessible to Christians; the fourth volume will contain very copious remarks on the Arabs of the Desert, and particularly the Wahabys... Continue reading book >>




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